Feminist Film Video Theory
Social Construction of Gender <ul><li>Sex (biological differences) vs. gender (cutlural meanings assigned to sex differenc...
Mirror Stage (Lacan) <ul><li>Baby recognizes itself (develops individuated identity) by looking in a mirror. </li></ul><ul...
Laura Mulvey: Male Gaze <ul><li>Camera often takes male point of view </li></ul><ul><li>Cinema is all about male scopophil...
Feminism Beyond Mulvey… <ul><li>Questions the idea that spectators have no choice but to identify with heterosexual male g...
Feminism Beyond Mulvey II <ul><li>Emphasizes how cinema teaches us how to perform gender roles (how to act masculine or fe...
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Feministfilmtheory

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Feministfilmtheory

  1. 1. Feminist Film Video Theory
  2. 2. Social Construction of Gender <ul><li>Sex (biological differences) vs. gender (cutlural meanings assigned to sex difference) </li></ul><ul><li>Our understanding of gender is influenced by the culture in which we live. </li></ul><ul><li>Gender is a peformance (of sometimes unconscious, repeated behaviors) </li></ul>
  3. 3. Mirror Stage (Lacan) <ul><li>Baby recognizes itself (develops individuated identity) by looking in a mirror. </li></ul><ul><li>Our sense of self is ultimately dependent upon our sense of the “other” </li></ul><ul><li>Our identity is determined by being both subject and object of the gaze. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Laura Mulvey: Male Gaze <ul><li>Camera often takes male point of view </li></ul><ul><li>Cinema is all about male scopophilia (voyeurism) </li></ul><ul><li>Cinema forces spectators to identify with the male looker and see the woman into a powerless, fetishized object. </li></ul>
  5. 5. Feminism Beyond Mulvey… <ul><li>Questions the idea that spectators have no choice but to identify with heterosexual male gaze. </li></ul><ul><li>Suggests that spectators can resist dominant meanings (blending pleasure and critique) </li></ul><ul><li>Explores how gender identity intersects with race, class, sexuality and disability (and how spectatorship is cultural). </li></ul>
  6. 6. Feminism Beyond Mulvey II <ul><li>Emphasizes how cinema teaches us how to perform gender roles (how to act masculine or feminine) </li></ul><ul><li>Considers films / videos as products of their time (rather than as playing out universal psychological themes) </li></ul><ul><li>Analyzes how the context of online video viewing may make us rethink theories of spectatorship. </li></ul>
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