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Critical Race Theory
Race is a Social Construction <ul><li>Race is  not  a matter of biological difference (race is understand differently acro...
Whiteness <ul><li>White is a “racial”  category (thus “race” is present even in all-white films). </li></ul><ul><li>Whiten...
Racism vs. Prejudice  <ul><li>To be prejudiced is to have an individual dislike for a group of people. </li></ul><ul><li>T...
Digital Divide <ul><li>Unequal access to digital technologies (race, class, gender, geographic location) </li></ul><ul><li...
 
Race and the Gaze <ul><li>Visual texts often implicitly assume a white spectator. </li></ul><ul><li>Nonwhite people often ...
Historical Legacies <ul><li>European colonialism </li></ul><ul><li>Slavery </li></ul><ul><li>Native American Conquest / Ge...
Questions to ask about race… <ul><li>Is the camera’s gaze a racialized gaze? Who is the implied spectator? </li></ul><ul><...
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Critical Race Theory

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Transcript of "Critical Race Theory"

  1. 1. Critical Race Theory
  2. 2. Race is a Social Construction <ul><li>Race is not a matter of biological difference (race is understand differently across societies) </li></ul><ul><li>Societies often define “racial identity” in terms of positive and negative stereotypes. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Whiteness <ul><li>White is a “racial” category (thus “race” is present even in all-white films). </li></ul><ul><li>Whiteness is defined in opposition to other racial categories. </li></ul><ul><li>White privilege (the power and advantages that come with having white skin in the U.S.)---See http://seamonkey.ed.asu.edu/~mcisaac/emc598ge/Unpacking.html </li></ul>
  4. 4. Racism vs. Prejudice <ul><li>To be prejudiced is to have an individual dislike for a group of people. </li></ul><ul><li>To be racist is to have the power to deny opportunity to another group of people. </li></ul><ul><li>Racism is often committed by institutions (corporations, the legal system, schools) </li></ul>
  5. 5. Digital Divide <ul><li>Unequal access to digital technologies (race, class, gender, geographic location) </li></ul><ul><li>Gap in United States is narrowing, but inequalities remain. </li></ul>
  6. 7. Race and the Gaze <ul><li>Visual texts often implicitly assume a white spectator. </li></ul><ul><li>Nonwhite people often depicted as “exotic” and nontechnological. </li></ul><ul><li>Nonwhite characters less likely to be heros (more likely to be villains or comic sidekicks) </li></ul>
  7. 8. Historical Legacies <ul><li>European colonialism </li></ul><ul><li>Slavery </li></ul><ul><li>Native American Conquest / Genocide </li></ul><ul><li>(Depends in part on visual tropes that </li></ul><ul><li>position whites as civilized and nonwhites </li></ul><ul><li>as “primitive,” whites as “explorers” and </li></ul><ul><li>nonwhites as “objects” to be found) </li></ul>
  8. 9. Questions to ask about race… <ul><li>Is the camera’s gaze a racialized gaze? Who is the implied spectator? </li></ul><ul><li>How does the text reinforce or subvert racial stereotypes? </li></ul><ul><li>How does the text portray black, white, asian, latino, and indigenous identities in relation or opposition to one another? </li></ul><ul><li>Does the text challenge or reinforce/ignore structures of institutional racism? </li></ul><ul><li>How does the text (implicitly) reference tropes of colonialism, conquest, and/or slavery? </li></ul>
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