Learning for our connected times:Preparing to live with surprises<br />Peter Albion<br />Digital Learning Research Network...
Schooling has brought us this far – now we must connect to an unpredictable future.<br />Photo: Thomas Hawk CC (by)(nc)(sa...
What teachers do with learning in the next ten years will determine the future of the world.<br />(Stephen Heppell, 2011) ...
Schooling worked in a stable world but we are living at the margins of possibility.<br />Red Crater, Tongariro Crossing, N...
Teachers must prepare learners to deal with the unexpected, to live with surprises.<br />North Ambrym, Vanuatu, Jul 2011<b...
Connect for support in living with surprises.<br />Brisbane flood aftermath, Jan 2011<br />
Information stocks are becoming flows.<br />Milford Sound Road, New Zealand, Dec 2007<br />
Traditional schooling transmitted information from teacher to learner.<br />Microsoft ClipArt<br />
Information changed slowly.<br />Moiry Glacier, Switzerland, Jul 2006<br />
Access was restricted – few could read.<br />Photo: rosefirerising CC (by) (nc) (nd)<br />
It seemed possible for school to teach everything needed for life.<br />Microsoft ClipArt<br />
Four waves of technology have changed the way we share information.<br />Photo: Kanaka's Paradise Life CC (by) (nc) <br />
Desktop publishing enabled anybody to produce quality print material.<br />Photo: MarcinWichary CC (by)<br />
The World Wide Web made a single copy of a document available globally.<br />Microsoft ClipArt<br />
Web 2.0 allows anybody to publish to the World Wide Web.<br />
Mobile Internet allows anyone to publish or access from anywhere.<br />Callum, 2010<br />
Our understanding of knowledge evolves as information expands.<br />Photo: patriziasoliani CC (by) (nc)<br />
Objectivist knowledge exists independently – it can be owned and transmitted.<br />Photo: Thomas Hawk CC (by) (nc)<br />
Constructivist knowledge exists in the learner – it is built from personal experience.<br />Microsoft ClipArt<br />
Connectivist knowledge exists in the network– learning is making connections.<br />Microsoft ClipArt<br />
Education should reflect the world.<br />Milford Sound Road, New Zealand, Dec 2007<br />
In the 21st century replication gives way to customization and creativity.<br />Photo: Andrew McFarlane & CC (by) (nc) <br />
4 Cs of 21st century skills are Creativity, Critical thinking, Communication, & Collaboration.<br />Partnership for 21st C...
Learning should be building knowledge not accumulating information.<br />Microsoft ClipArt<br />
Everyday creativity<br />refers to a process which brings together at least one active human mind, and the material or dig...
Spice up learning by connecting.<br />Kuching, Malaysia, Jun 2010<br />
Making is connecting – materials & people.<br />Sydney, Jul 2011<br />
Use Web 2.0 tools to connect and share creativity.<br />Wes Fryer<br />
Connect learners to build knowledge together.<br />
Connectivity presents new challenges for learning and teaching.<br />Chartres, France, Jul 2009<br />
Connection to information makes misuse possible.<br />Microsoft ClipArt<br />
Connected working requires collaboration skills.<br />Microsoft ClipArt<br />
Collaborating in networks makes disconnected assessment problematic.<br />Madero Tango, Buenos Aires, Aug 2010<br />
Connect teachers for learning & sharing.<br />
Innovation may be incremental or disruptive.<br />Diagram: Catherine Styles CC (by)<br />
Lifelong learning is now fundamental.<br />Photo: jcfrog CC (by)<br />
Teachers should be expert learners.<br />
The big shift is from push to pull.<br />Microsoft ClipArt<br />Microsoft ClipArt<br />
Learners & teachers need to manage information flow.<br />Photo:ckchanwebCC(by) (nc)<br />
Information can be hunted but farming is more efficient.<br />Photos: mrshife & vredeseilanden CC (by)(nc)(sa)<br />
Search is good but subscription is better. Use RSS.<br />
Follow a leader in an area of interest. <br />
Build bridges to connect to personal & professional learning networks.<br />Annecy, France, Jul 2006<br />
Build digital networks using existing networks as a base.<br />
Connecting and contributing builds reputation and trust.<br />Photo: Jean‐François Chénier CC (by) (nc) <br />
Connectivity blurs the boundaries between work and social life.<br />Microsoft ClipArt<br />
Schooling worked in a stable world but we are living at the margins of possibility.<br />Red Crater, Tongariro Crossing, N...
Teachers must prepare learners to deal with the unexpected, to live with surprises.<br />North Ambrym, Vanuatu, Jul 2011<b...
Connect for support in living with surprises.<br />Brisbane flood aftermath, Jan 2011<br />
Learning for our connected times:Preparing to live with surprises<br />Peter Albion<br />Digital Learning Research Network...
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Learning for our connected times: Learning to live with surprises

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Slides for a presentation to the Connected Learning Community showcases arranged by Toowoomba Catholic Education Office.

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  • Presentationbased on thinking over recent years but with influences from reading in the past week2 key points – connectivity and living with change.World is much more connected than it was a generation ago. Contrast in contact with travelling children and grandchildren – Jane in NZ, Nick in Europe, Hannah in USA, Emily in France with Facebook &amp; Murray – as per QUICK piecesJust this morning New York Times article picked up via Twitter – 65% of children entering school are likely to end up doing work that has not been invented yet. The industrial model of schooling needs to be revised for that.Forrest Gump – “Life is like a box of chocolates …”Images – mine, MS ClipArt or Creative Commons from Flickr + snaps of web pages
  • Our education has worked pretty well – at least for some of us. We have managed to adapt to the changes but change is increasingly rapid and the future is unpredictable. In the past people were able to assume that the future would be reasonably similar. That is no longer a fair assumption and education needs to prepare for that.
  • Similar theme to some that have been around for a long time – I touch the future, I teach
  • Stephen Heppell commented that technology has taken us to the margins of possibility. We don’t expect to see oil leaks from deep beneath the ground or to have flights stopped by volcanic ash clouds but these things happen because we are operating at the limits of what technology permits. Our schooling system worked well when it was fair to expect that children would live in a world not too different from the one in which they grew up.
  • Now we don’t know what to expect so education needs to prepare for surprises.It seems unlikely that schooling explicitly prepared Mike from London to participate in in traditional dancing in Vanuatu.
  • The connections that we make with people and information can help us in living with surprises.The use of social media (Facebook &amp; Twitter) during the Queensland floods this year is a powerful practical example. Queensland Police Service made very effective use of those services for informing the public who followed their sites.Cleaning up and recovery was assisted by networks of people – family, friends, work mates, strangers – often facilitated by social network connections. Jane used Facebook effectively to contact family, provide information and tap a wider network of helpers.
  • Historically we have thought about information like an object that we can treat like a stock of material stored away for access when required. Originally information was stored in people’s heads but was later recorded on tablets, scrolls, books that could be stored on shelves or in libraries. More recently we have been able to store information in computers and on CD-ROMs or similar devices.Now the rate of generation and change of information is so fast that it makes less sense to think of it as being a static stock of material. It is more sensible to think of it as a flow from which we can extract what we need at any moment but should not imagine that it will be the same next time we look.
  • Traditional teaching was mostly transmissive. Information was scarce so it made sense for teachers who had access to important information to pass it on to learners who did not. Schooling was about preparing learners for life and work. Much of the learning was just-in-case.
  • Transmission as the central approach to education made sense when information was limited and changed slowly. What was known about any discipline was limited and it changed only slowly. It was fair to assume that what was known by one generation would be needed by the next generation and those that followed. If there was new information then it was likely to be only a small addition to what was already there.
  • In oral cultures information was held in the minds of the older generation. That placed a natural restriction on access.Even when information was recorded in written form the number of copies was restricted, relatively few people could access the copies in the locations where they were held and only a minority of the population could read.In those circumstances it was necessary for those with access to information to take responsibility for passing it on.
  • Given the limited amount of information available and the relatively slow rate of change it seemed reasonable to expect that schooling could provide learners with all the knowledge that might be needed to prepare them for life. It was possible to teach things just-in-case they might be needed later or with reasonable expectation that what would be needed could be predicted.
  • Since the personal computer appeared in the late 1970s there have been at least 4 waves of technological change that have affected the way that we share information and connect with other people.
  • As the volume of information has increased and the ways in which we access and manage it have changed our understanding of knowledge has evolved.
  • If the way that information is access and managed has changed in the world then what we do in education needs to reflect that. We need to consider information as a constantly changing flow and consider how we connect to that flow.In a world of constant change we need to be thinking about how to prepare for dealing with change and the surprises that we encounter rather than preparing for a future that is essentially the same as our present or past.
  • Creativity rather than replication is the key to dealing with constant and raoid change.
  • Gauntlett, D. (2011). Making Is Connecting: The Social Meaning of Creativity, from DIY and Knitting to YouTube and Web 2.0. Cambridge, UK: Polity Press.
  • With so much information available for use by learners and themselves, educators need to develop capability to manage the flow of information - to locate, access, process, and publish information in ways that enhance learning.
  • The Internet and search tools make it possible to hunt out information as it is needed. Those techniques are useful but there are better ways to ensure access to the important information that can help us to do our jobs.
  • Learning for our connected times: Learning to live with surprises

    1. 1. Learning for our connected times:Preparing to live with surprises<br />Peter Albion<br />Digital Learning Research Network<br />Faculty of Education, USQ<br />Microsoft ClipArt<br />
    2. 2. Schooling has brought us this far – now we must connect to an unpredictable future.<br />Photo: Thomas Hawk CC (by)(nc)(sa)<br />
    3. 3. What teachers do with learning in the next ten years will determine the future of the world.<br />(Stephen Heppell, 2011) - YouTube<br />
    4. 4. Schooling worked in a stable world but we are living at the margins of possibility.<br />Red Crater, Tongariro Crossing, New Zealand, Nov 2010<br />
    5. 5. Teachers must prepare learners to deal with the unexpected, to live with surprises.<br />North Ambrym, Vanuatu, Jul 2011<br />
    6. 6. Connect for support in living with surprises.<br />Brisbane flood aftermath, Jan 2011<br />
    7. 7. Information stocks are becoming flows.<br />Milford Sound Road, New Zealand, Dec 2007<br />
    8. 8. Traditional schooling transmitted information from teacher to learner.<br />Microsoft ClipArt<br />
    9. 9. Information changed slowly.<br />Moiry Glacier, Switzerland, Jul 2006<br />
    10. 10. Access was restricted – few could read.<br />Photo: rosefirerising CC (by) (nc) (nd)<br />
    11. 11. It seemed possible for school to teach everything needed for life.<br />Microsoft ClipArt<br />
    12. 12. Four waves of technology have changed the way we share information.<br />Photo: Kanaka's Paradise Life CC (by) (nc) <br />
    13. 13. Desktop publishing enabled anybody to produce quality print material.<br />Photo: MarcinWichary CC (by)<br />
    14. 14. The World Wide Web made a single copy of a document available globally.<br />Microsoft ClipArt<br />
    15. 15. Web 2.0 allows anybody to publish to the World Wide Web.<br />
    16. 16. Mobile Internet allows anyone to publish or access from anywhere.<br />Callum, 2010<br />
    17. 17. Our understanding of knowledge evolves as information expands.<br />Photo: patriziasoliani CC (by) (nc)<br />
    18. 18. Objectivist knowledge exists independently – it can be owned and transmitted.<br />Photo: Thomas Hawk CC (by) (nc)<br />
    19. 19. Constructivist knowledge exists in the learner – it is built from personal experience.<br />Microsoft ClipArt<br />
    20. 20. Connectivist knowledge exists in the network– learning is making connections.<br />Microsoft ClipArt<br />
    21. 21. Education should reflect the world.<br />Milford Sound Road, New Zealand, Dec 2007<br />
    22. 22. In the 21st century replication gives way to customization and creativity.<br />Photo: Andrew McFarlane & CC (by) (nc) <br />
    23. 23. 4 Cs of 21st century skills are Creativity, Critical thinking, Communication, & Collaboration.<br />Partnership for 21st Century Skills<br />
    24. 24. Learning should be building knowledge not accumulating information.<br />Microsoft ClipArt<br />
    25. 25. Everyday creativity<br />refers to a process which brings together at least one active human mind, and the material or digital world, in the activity of making something which is novel in that context, and is a process which evokes a feeling of joy.<br />David Gauntlett<br />
    26. 26. Spice up learning by connecting.<br />Kuching, Malaysia, Jun 2010<br />
    27. 27. Making is connecting – materials & people.<br />Sydney, Jul 2011<br />
    28. 28. Use Web 2.0 tools to connect and share creativity.<br />Wes Fryer<br />
    29. 29. Connect learners to build knowledge together.<br />
    30. 30. Connectivity presents new challenges for learning and teaching.<br />Chartres, France, Jul 2009<br />
    31. 31. Connection to information makes misuse possible.<br />Microsoft ClipArt<br />
    32. 32. Connected working requires collaboration skills.<br />Microsoft ClipArt<br />
    33. 33. Collaborating in networks makes disconnected assessment problematic.<br />Madero Tango, Buenos Aires, Aug 2010<br />
    34. 34. Connect teachers for learning & sharing.<br />
    35. 35. Innovation may be incremental or disruptive.<br />Diagram: Catherine Styles CC (by)<br />
    36. 36. Lifelong learning is now fundamental.<br />Photo: jcfrog CC (by)<br />
    37. 37. Teachers should be expert learners.<br />
    38. 38. The big shift is from push to pull.<br />Microsoft ClipArt<br />Microsoft ClipArt<br />
    39. 39. Learners & teachers need to manage information flow.<br />Photo:ckchanwebCC(by) (nc)<br />
    40. 40. Information can be hunted but farming is more efficient.<br />Photos: mrshife & vredeseilanden CC (by)(nc)(sa)<br />
    41. 41. Search is good but subscription is better. Use RSS.<br />
    42. 42. Follow a leader in an area of interest. <br />
    43. 43. Build bridges to connect to personal & professional learning networks.<br />Annecy, France, Jul 2006<br />
    44. 44. Build digital networks using existing networks as a base.<br />
    45. 45. Connecting and contributing builds reputation and trust.<br />Photo: Jean‐François Chénier CC (by) (nc) <br />
    46. 46. Connectivity blurs the boundaries between work and social life.<br />Microsoft ClipArt<br />
    47. 47. Schooling worked in a stable world but we are living at the margins of possibility.<br />Red Crater, Tongariro Crossing, New Zealand, Nov 2010<br />
    48. 48. Teachers must prepare learners to deal with the unexpected, to live with surprises.<br />North Ambrym, Vanuatu, Jul 2011<br />
    49. 49. Connect for support in living with surprises.<br />Brisbane flood aftermath, Jan 2011<br />
    50. 50. Learning for our connected times:Preparing to live with surprises<br />Peter Albion<br />Digital Learning Research Network<br />Faculty of Education, USQ<br />Peter.Albion@usq.edu.au<br />Microsoft ClipArt<br />

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