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dakóta alcantara-camachoVerna ZafraApril 9, 2012EN461-01PART 1
Zafra
• Keri Hulme• Born March 9, 1947 inChristchurch, New Zealand• English, Scottish, and Maori (KāiTahu) ancestry• Considers h...
• Earlier publications written under KaiTainui• Other works include The Silences Between(1982), Te Kaihu:TheWindeater (198...
alcantara-camacho
• Hulme’s first novel• Began in Motueka, 1966> First dreams of Simon> Short story “Simon Peter’s Shell”• Completed at Moer...
• Rejected by several publishers• Finally published in 1984 bySpiral, a feminist collectivebased in Wellington• Awards:> N...
Zafra
• Aotearoa / New Zealand• Remote island country> One of the last to beinhabited by humans• Part of Polynesia• South Pacifi...
• Events in the novel and publication of the novel: 1980s• Period in New Zealand history of increased efforts toraise “awa...
(New Zealand History Online)•Waitangi Day:> Annual holiday tocommemorate signing oftheTreaty of Waitangi•Treaty of Waitang...
alcantara-camacho
• Non-traditional plot – “spiraling”• Unique narration:>Third-person point of view> Stream of consciousness> Dreams, journ...
• Setting:> Whangaroa (Holmes, Gillayley residence)> Moerangi (beach retreat)•Time Frame:> Prologue: 1981 or beyond…> Main...
Zafra
• Questions of Maoriness / The Right to Write> One Maori great-grandparent = 1/8 Maori> “The Bone People […] is a novel by...
• Acknowledging the Maori and Blending New ZealandCultures> The novel “... [D]oes not merely shed light on a smallbut comp...
alcantara-camacho
• Broken Families• Isolation• Identity and Cultural Loss
alcantara-camacho / Zafra
Hou :1. (stative) be new, recent, modern.Koru:1. (noun) Colensoa physaloides - a shrubby plant found inshady areas and str...
Hōu KoruHōu Koru (noun): A literarydevice used by indigenous(Maori) authors to envision,to create, give life to, (new)solu...
Hōu Koru(Old) Problems:• Dealing with domestic violence• Mending broken families• Finding one’s identity
alcantara-camacho / Zafra
Keep these questions in mind as we finish readingThe Bone People:1. Do you see any spirals or “koru” in the book?2. What n...
4. Kerewin says, "Its very strange, but whereas byblood, flesh and inheritance, I am but an eighthMaori, by heart, spirit,...
- Finish The Bone People!- Read the critical essay “Reawakening”by Benediktsson> Sent via email 03/26> Want a hardcopy? Ju...
dakóta alcantara-camachoVerna ZafraApril 16, 2012EN461-01PART 2
alcantara-camacho / Zafra
Hōu KoruHōu Koru (noun): A literarydevice used by indigenous(Maori) authors to envision,to create, give life to, (new)solu...
• (Old) Problem: Family violence> “… [W]oe betide the brat if he doesn’t do whatever he’stold to [...]The matter is settle...
Hōu Koru: Family• (Old) Problem: Mending broken familiesKerewin: "Yet, Nobodys stomped on my heart except family, so why a...
Hōu Koru: Identity & ‘Assimilation’• (Old) Problem: Finding One’s Identity & ‘Assimilation’“I can blame my grandfather… I ...
Please get into groups of 2-3 anddiscuss one of the questionsposed from Part 1.Write whichquestion your groupwould like to...
1.) “Transgressing Boundaries”~ Mary Ann Hughes2.) “Good-Eating: Ethics and Biculturalismin Reading ‘The Bone People’”~ Ph...
“Transgressing Boundaries”by Mary Ann Hughes• Analyzes popular critiques of Hulmewriting as a Maori• Examines different “b...
“Good-Eating: Ethics and Biculturalism inReading ‘The Bone People’”by Philip Armstrong• Moral reading: reader puts him- or...
“Reawakening the Gods: Realism and theSupernatural in Silko and Hulme”byThomas E. Benediktsson•Realism can be regulated by...
FreeWrite Part 1:Pick a “real” cultural or identity issue thataffects your day-to-day life. Write about howit impacts you,...
FreeWrite Part 2:Imagine some kind of supernatural / mystical /spiritual intervention that has taken place orwill take pla...
Follow link:http://www.nzonscreen.com/title/kai-purakau-1987
Works CitedArmstrong, Philip. "Good-eating : Ethics and Biculturalism in Reading„The Bone People‟." Ariel: A Review of Int...
Works Cited“Keri Hulme.” New Zealand Literature File. University of Auckland, n.d.Web. 20 Mar. 2012.New Zealand History On...
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  • Christchurch, NZ = along the east coast of South Island English (father), Scottish/Maori (mother) Kai Tahu = primary iwi (tribe) in Southern NZ, based in Christchurch
  • Christchurch, NZ = along the east coast of South Island English (father), Scottish/Maori (mother) Kai Tahu = primary iwi (tribe) in Southern NZ, based in Christchurch Te Kaihu = short story collection Strands = poetry collection Stonefish = short story collection
  • - 1642: First recorded contact w/ Pakeha
  • - 1642: First recorded contact w/ Pakeha
  • - 1642: First recorded contact w/ Pakeha
  • Moerangi, WaikatoWhangaroa, Northland
  • Transcript of "Bone people"

    1. 1. dakóta alcantara-camachoVerna ZafraApril 9, 2012EN461-01PART 1
    2. 2. Zafra
    3. 3. • Keri Hulme• Born March 9, 1947 inChristchurch, New Zealand• English, Scottish, and Maori (KāiTahu) ancestry• Considers herself Maori instead of Pakeha(person of European descent)• Often spent time with extended family frommother’s side in Moeraki• Began writing poems and short stories at the ageof 12(New Zealand Book Council; CoursePak)
    4. 4. • Earlier publications written under KaiTainui• Other works include The Silences Between(1982), Te Kaihu:TheWindeater (1986), andHomeplaces (1989)• Self-proclaimed neuter, no children• Currently lives in Okarito, New Zealand• Began pursuing a law degree,but stopped after four terms• At 25, tried to write full-time, butwas forced to take “odd” jobs(New Zealand Book Council)
    5. 5. alcantara-camacho
    6. 6. • Hulme’s first novel• Began in Motueka, 1966> First dreams of Simon> Short story “Simon Peter’s Shell”• Completed at Moeraki and Okarito,1978• Mother helped in the revisions•Took 12 years and 7 versions tofinish(New Zealand Book Council)
    7. 7. • Rejected by several publishers• Finally published in 1984 bySpiral, a feminist collectivebased in Wellington• Awards:> New Zealand Book Award forFiction (1984)> Mobil Pegasus Award (1984)> Booker Prize (1985)(New Zealand Book Council)
    8. 8. Zafra
    9. 9. • Aotearoa / New Zealand• Remote island country> One of the last to beinhabited by humans• Part of Polynesia• South Pacific Ocean,southeast of Australia• Novel written in SouthIsland• Events of novel take placein North Island(New Zealand History Online)http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~blanchec/regions_map.gif
    10. 10. • Events in the novel and publication of the novel: 1980s• Period in New Zealand history of increased efforts toraise “awareness and acceptance of Maoritanga […]and for acknowledgement of Maori as the tangatawhenua (people of the land)”(New Zealand History Online)
    11. 11. (New Zealand History Online)•Waitangi Day:> Annual holiday tocommemorate signing oftheTreaty of Waitangi•Treaty of Waitangi> Feb. 6, 1840> Pact between Britain andthe Maoris> Equal rights, Maori landownership, governanceunder the British Crown>Theory vs. Practice• Protest of Waitangi Dayhttp://www.treaty2u.govt.nz/cool-stuff/cartoons/index.htm
    12. 12. alcantara-camacho
    13. 13. • Non-traditional plot – “spiraling”• Unique narration:>Third-person point of view> Stream of consciousness> Dreams, journal entries, poems• Language and diction> English with Maori words and phrases(translation glossary)> Mix of British/New Zealander vernacularand archaic speech• Reflects pattern of Maori rhythm
    14. 14. • Setting:> Whangaroa (Holmes, Gillayley residence)> Moerangi (beach retreat)•Time Frame:> Prologue: 1981 or beyond…> Main storyline: 1980 – 1981(?)> Epilogue: 1981 or beyond…• Main characters:> Kerewin Holmes> Joseph Gillayley> Simon Gillayley• Minor characters:>TheTainuis> Binny Daniels>Tiaki Mira
    15. 15. Zafra
    16. 16. • Questions of Maoriness / The Right to Write> One Maori great-grandparent = 1/8 Maori> “The Bone People […] is a novel by a Pakehawhich has won an award intended for a Maori”(Stead 104)> Time span to write the novel “reflects thedifficulty of expressing or achieving a nationalvoice when the national identity in question isconfused, diffused and derivative” (Broidy 164)(Contemporary Literary Criticism, Stead)
    17. 17. • Acknowledging the Maori and Blending New ZealandCultures> The novel “... [D]oes not merely shed light on a smallbut complex and sometimes misunderstood country, butalso, more generally, enlarges our sense of life’s possibledimensions” (Ward 163)> Kerewin’s character promotes a collective Maori stand“… against Pakeha ecology and social hegemony in NewZealand today” (Jacobs) 165> “The Bone People works because it draws on bothMaori and Pakeha cultural traditions” (Hughes 255)(Contemporary Literary Criticism, CoursePak)
    18. 18. alcantara-camacho
    19. 19. • Broken Families• Isolation• Identity and Cultural Loss
    20. 20. alcantara-camacho / Zafra
    21. 21. Hou :1. (stative) be new, recent, modern.Koru:1. (noun) Colensoa physaloides - a shrubby plant found inshady areas and stream banks .The attractive soft,dark green, large leaves are prominently veined andserrated. Deep blue, tubular flowers occur for severalmonths from spring.The berries are also dark blue2. (noun) fold, loop, coil, curled shoot3. (noun) symbol used in Māori art as a symbol ofcreation, represents new leaf of fern frond, new life,new beginnings, new possibilities, awakening,positive change.Hōu Koru(Te Aka Māori-English, English-Māori Dictionary and Index Online)
    22. 22. Hōu KoruHōu Koru (noun): A literarydevice used by indigenous(Maori) authors to envision,to create, give life to, (new)solutions to (old) Problems.
    23. 23. Hōu Koru(Old) Problems:• Dealing with domestic violence• Mending broken families• Finding one’s identity
    24. 24. alcantara-camacho / Zafra
    25. 25. Keep these questions in mind as we finish readingThe Bone People:1. Do you see any spirals or “koru” in the book?2. What new beginnings, awakenings, orpersonal transformations do you see withinthe text?3. At the beach house, Joe says he feelsremorseful for hitting his son, yet continuesto hit him…What complex relationship doeseach character have with violence?
    26. 26. 4. Kerewin says, "Its very strange, but whereas byblood, flesh and inheritance, I am but an eighthMaori, by heart, spirit, and inclination, I feel allMaori" (61) – How are modern concepts of racecomplicated by this book?5. How does spirituality appear throughout thetext and what function does it have? How do thecharacters become enhanced by their spiritualrelationships?6. How would you write the ending of this book?
    27. 27. - Finish The Bone People!- Read the critical essay “Reawakening”by Benediktsson> Sent via email 03/26> Want a hardcopy? Just ask..- Ponder the discussion questionsand bring back the handout
    28. 28. dakóta alcantara-camachoVerna ZafraApril 16, 2012EN461-01PART 2
    29. 29. alcantara-camacho / Zafra
    30. 30. Hōu KoruHōu Koru (noun): A literarydevice used by indigenous(Maori) authors to envision,to create, give life to, (new)solutions to (old) Problems.
    31. 31. • (Old) Problem: Family violence> “… [W]oe betide the brat if he doesn’t do whatever he’stold to [...]The matter is settled right then, thump, that’sit. It always looks so ridiculous, Joe hefty and twice hischild’s size – but that’s the way we do it in good oldGodzone” (95)• (New) Solution: Collective responsibility> “‘I swear on his head […] not to hit him again. If hedeserves it, I’ll tell you and you can decide’ […] ‘A smidginof responsibility, a scantling, a scruple of responsibility Iaccept’” (195)> “‘I wasn’t going to hit him […] I said I wouldn’t, withoutyou agreeing, and I meant that.’” (269)Hōu Koru: Violence
    32. 32. Hōu Koru: Family• (Old) Problem: Mending broken familiesKerewin: "Yet, Nobodys stomped on my heart except family, so why am Imistrustful of people” (69)Joe: Grieving from loss of wife and child.Simon: surviving orphanage and abuse who can’t remember where he comesfrom• (New) Solution: Creating ‘New’ FamilyJoe: "Kerewin... I was trying to maker her fit my idea of what a friend, apartner was. I could see only the one way... whatever she thought she was,bend her to the idea that lovers are, marriage is, the only sanity. Dont acceptmerely what she can offer, make her give and take more.. now i can see otherpossibilities, other ways, and there is still a hope..." (381)Kerewin: ”Did you think I could build a square house? So the round shell households them all in its spiraling embrace. Noise and riot, peace and quiet, all ismusic in the sphere."
    33. 33. Hōu Koru: Identity & ‘Assimilation’• (Old) Problem: Finding One’s Identity & ‘Assimilation’“I can blame my grandfather… I think he was ashamed, secretlyashamed of my Nana and her Maoriness… he took it out on me forbeing like her, for being dark, and speaking Maori” (227)(New) Solution: Spiritual Healing“Ruapahu! (Nonsense)You are a sick man, a broken man, but now it istime for you to heal, to be whole.To flourish and bear fruit. Go tosleep.”“[Joe] talks a lot that night. About the Kaumatua.About Simon. AboutKerewin. About the dream world, and the world of the dead. Aboutlegends and myths, and nine canoes, tatau pounamu, the possible newworld, the impossible new world’ (377)
    34. 34. Please get into groups of 2-3 anddiscuss one of the questionsposed from Part 1.Write whichquestion your groupwould like to talkabout on the board.
    35. 35. 1.) “Transgressing Boundaries”~ Mary Ann Hughes2.) “Good-Eating: Ethics and Biculturalismin Reading ‘The Bone People’”~ Philip Armstrong3.) “Reawakening the Gods: Realism andthe Supernatural in Silko and Hulme”~Thomas E. Benediktsson
    36. 36. “Transgressing Boundaries”by Mary Ann Hughes• Analyzes popular critiques of Hulmewriting as a Maori• Examines different “boundaries” crossedin the novel> Cultural, racial, social, religious• Blending and portrayal of both Pakehaand Maori cultures, instead of themarginalization of one or the other
    37. 37. “Good-Eating: Ethics and Biculturalism inReading ‘The Bone People’”by Philip Armstrong• Moral reading: reader puts him- or herself inthe position of the protagonist• Raises questions of ethical behavior in thenovel>Violence, sacrifice, cannibalism• Connects eating trope to approachingpostcolonial text and biculturalism
    38. 38. “Reawakening the Gods: Realism and theSupernatural in Silko and Hulme”byThomas E. Benediktsson•Realism can be regulated by hegemony•Indigenous authors resist dominance through defying“realist” notions•Connections in Indigenous Authors Responses toColonialism•Create “fictive realm of possibility and power” (123)•Political Connections – nationalist struggle and selfdetermination•Post-Colonial Identity – skin color, heritage, androgyny•EmbracingTraditional Spiritual Healing fromTrauma ofColonialism
    39. 39. FreeWrite Part 1:Pick a “real” cultural or identity issue thataffects your day-to-day life. Write about howit impacts you, and your relationship withyourself, your family, and your friends .
    40. 40. FreeWrite Part 2:Imagine some kind of supernatural / mystical /spiritual intervention that has taken place orwill take place in your life.In what form does it manifest? How does yourencounter with the supernatural / spiritualhelp you deal with your issue?Try to localize or indigenize your freewrite.
    41. 41. Follow link:http://www.nzonscreen.com/title/kai-purakau-1987
    42. 42. Works CitedArmstrong, Philip. "Good-eating : Ethics and Biculturalism in Reading„The Bone People‟." Ariel: A Review of International EnglishLiterature 2.32 (2001): 7-27. Web.Benediktsson, Thomas E. "The Reawakening of the Gods : Realismand the Supernatural in Silko and Hulme." Critique: Studies inContemporary Fiction 2.33 (1992): 121-131. Web.“Coursepak.” EN461. University of Guam. TS.“Hulme, Keri.” New Zealand Book Council. New Zealand BookCouncil, n.d. Web. 19 Mar. 2012.Hulme, Keri. The Bone People. New York: Penguin Books, 1986. Print."Keri Hulme." Contemporary Literary Criticism: Yearbook 1985. Vol.39. Detroit: Gale Research Co,1986. 158-167. Print.
    43. 43. Works Cited“Keri Hulme.” New Zealand Literature File. University of Auckland, n.d.Web. 20 Mar. 2012.New Zealand History Online. History Group of the New ZealandMinistry for Culture and Heritage, 16 Mar. 1999. Web. 24 Mar.2012.Stead, C.K. “Keri Hulme‟s „The Bone People‟ and the Pegasus Awardfor Maori Literature.” Ariel 16.4 (1985): 101-108. Web.Te Aka Māori-English, English-Māori Dictionary and Index Online.Pearson Education New Zealand , n.d. 3 Apr. 2012.
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