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Khurram Spiral
Khurram Spiral
Khurram Spiral
Khurram Spiral
Khurram Spiral
Khurram Spiral
Khurram Spiral
Khurram Spiral
Khurram Spiral
Khurram Spiral
Khurram Spiral
Khurram Spiral
Khurram Spiral
Khurram Spiral
Khurram Spiral
Khurram Spiral
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Khurram Spiral

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Spiral Model

Spiral Model

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  • 1.
  • 2. Introduction<br />Malik Khurram<br />BS (telecom) <br />Section 4th (B)<br />Topic<br /> spiral model<br />Software Engineering-I<br />
  • 3. History<br /><ul><li>The spiral model was defined by Barry Boehm in his 1988 article
  • 4. This model was not the first model to discuss iterative development, but it was the first model to explain why the iteration matters.</li></ul>Software Engineering-I<br />
  • 5. Spiral Model<br /><ul><li> Spiral Lifecycle model
  • 6. System Development lifecycle (SDLC)
  • 7. Combines features of prototyping and waterfall model </li></ul>Software Engineering-I<br />
  • 8. When to use Spiral Model<br /><ul><li>When costs and risk evaluation is important
  • 9. For medium to high-risk projects
  • 10. Users are unsure of their needs
  • 11. Requirements are complex
  • 12. New product line
  • 13. Significant changes are expected </li></ul>Software Engineering-I<br />
  • 14. Four Fold Procedure<br />Evaluating the first prototype in terms of its strengths, weaknesses, and risks.<br />Defining the requirements of the second prototype <br />Planning and designing the second prototype<br />Constructing and testing the second prototype<br />Software Engineering-I<br />
  • 15. Phase in spiral model<br />There are four phases in the “SPIRAL MODEL” which are: <br />Plan <br />Risk analysis <br />Engineering <br />Customer evaluation<br /> Software Engineering-I<br />
  • 16. Plan<br /><ul><li>The objectives, alternatives and constraints of the project are determined and are documented.</li></ul> Software Engineering-I<br />
  • 17. Risk Analysis<br /><ul><li> All possible alternatives, which can help in developing a cost effective project are analyzed
  • 18. This phase identify and resolve all the possible risks in the project development</li></ul>Software Engineering-I<br />
  • 19. Engineering<br /><ul><li>The actual development of the project is carried out
  • 20. The output of this phase is passed through all the phases iteratively in order to obtain improvements in the same. </li></ul>Software Engineering-I<br />
  • 21. Customer evaluation<br /><ul><li>Developed product is passed on to the customer in order to receive customer’s comments and suggestions.
  • 22. This phase is very much similar to TESTING phase. Software Engineering-I</li></li></ul><li>
  • 23. Applications<br /><ul><li>The spiral model is used most often in large projects
  • 24. For smaller projects, the concept of agile software development is becoming a viable alternative</li></ul>Software Engineering-I<br />
  • 25. Advantages <br /><ul><li>Users see the system early because of rapid prototyping tools
  • 26. Critical high-risk functions are developed first
  • 27. The design does not have to be perfect
  • 28. Users can be closely tied to all lifecycle steps
  • 29. Early and frequent feedback from users</li></ul>Software Engineering-I<br /><ul><li>Users see the system early because of rapid prototyping tools
  • 30. Critical high-risk functions are developed first
  • 31. The design does not have to be perfect
  • 32. Users can be closely tied to all lifecycle steps
  • 33. Early and frequent feedback from users</li></ul>Software Engineering-I<br />
  • 34. Disadvantages<br /><ul><li>Time spent planning, resetting objectives, doing risk analysis and prototyping may be excessive
  • 35. The model is complex
  • 36. Risk assessment expertise is required</li></ul> Software Engineering-I<br />
  • 37. References<br /><ul><li>http://www.google.com
  • 38. http://wikipedia.org/wiki/Spiral_model
  • 39. http://scitec.uwichill.edu/spiralmodel.htm
  • 40. http://images.google.com.pk</li>

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