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MICHELLEMOOREARCHITECT                                       This sample of completed works illustrates a diverse range of...
01SHELTEREDHOUSINGDUBLIN, IRELAND
Senior Project Architect                           2003 – 08                                                              ...
02URBANRENEWALDUBLIN, IRELAND
Architect for Urban Design 2006Context As it was…Dolmen Court was part of a scheme of 300 courtyard houses  built in Ball...
03YOUTH, SPORTS& RESIDENTIALDUBLIN, IRELAND
Senior Project Architect                       2003 - 08Context Bluebell is a small inner city canal community in Dublin ...
04‘THE OASIS’MIDDLEMOUNTQLD, AUSTRALIA
Principal Architect                      2000Winner at The Royal Australian Institute of ArchitectsCentral Queensland Awar...
AFTER: Fixed and sliding screens provided various degrees of enclosure and formality required for different activities pro...
05SUSTAINABLEHOUSENORTH COASTNSW, AUSTRALIA
Principal Architect                 2000Context A keen bush walker was determined to realise an idea conceived with her  ...
06‘THE STADIUM’HERITAGE BARROCKHAMPTONQLD, AUSTRALIA
Principal Architect                     2000Context Owner of a failing nightclub sought to expand & diversify patronage b...
07HERITAGECITY HALLROCKHAMPTONQLD, AUSTRALIA
Principal Architect                    1999Winner at the Queensland Customer Service Awards 2000Context Rockhampton City ...
08SACRED SPACEC.Q.U. ROCKHAMPTONQLD, AUSTRALIA
Principal Architect                     1997Context Central Queensland University was keen to increase the number of  ove...
09WADJA WADJASCHOOLWOORABINDAQLD, AUSTRALIA
Principal Architect                       1996Context Wadja Wadja is the secondary school of Woorabinda, an aboriginal  c...
10AGED CAREEMU PARKQLD, AUSTRALIA
Project Architect                        1994Context The Country Women’s Association of a beachside township sought  fund...
MICHELLEMOOREARCHITECT                                       Designs are copyright of the architectural practices as follo...
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Michelle Moore Architect 10 Projects

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Background to the Inclusive Museum Project

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Transcript of "Michelle Moore Architect 10 Projects"

  1. 1. MICHELLEMOOREARCHITECT This sample of completed works illustrates a diverse range of focus10 PROJECTS areas related to Inclusive Design which, together with post-graduate Museum Studies, provide the foundation for beginning ‘The Inclusive Museum’ project.BACKGROUND TOTHE INCLUSIVEMUSEUM PROJECThttp://au.linkedin.com/pub/michelle-moore/16/a28/6a1
  2. 2. 01SHELTEREDHOUSINGDUBLIN, IRELAND
  3. 3. Senior Project Architect 2003 – 08 Context  As it was… Existing 8 & 13 storey residential tower blocks built in the 1960s in Ballymun (Dublin) had degenerated to the point of being dubbed ‘vertical slums’.  In the late 1990’s was decided to demolish the towers and Urban Regeneration of the entire Ballymun estate commenced.  The Sheltered Housing & Neighbourhood Centre became a key component of the new Masterplan. Brief  A local community hub to focus on the needs of older residents  43 Units  Various communal shared leisure and care facilities  4 Retail Units  Community Forum Offices  Commercial Kitchen & Laundry  Infrastructure including public roads, footpaths, lighting, landscaping, electrical substation & full spectrum of underground services Project considerations  Inclusive design for older people.  Investigated underlying issues behind security problems.  Explored and implemented security and anti-vandal strategies for minimal impact on the design intent, i.e. a welcoming non-institutional homelike environment.  Interviewed local elderly residents and developed shared facilities brief.  Clarified / resolved funding authority conditions with requirements of 2 end-user organisations.TOP: The mixed-use development, with shops at street level and residential  Coordinated 7 teams of engineers & consultants on existingunits over, promotes security through natural round-the-clock surveillance. infrastructure surveys and new proposals.ABOVE: Communal facilities, such as this fully catered activities and Project Value: €9.37 million (ex VAT)celebrations room, are enjoyed by both building residents and neighbours. Floor Area: 4300m2
  4. 4. 02URBANRENEWALDUBLIN, IRELAND
  5. 5. Architect for Urban Design 2006Context As it was…Dolmen Court was part of a scheme of 300 courtyard houses built in Ballymun by Dublin Corporation in the 1970s. The layout was based on the ‘Radburn’ principle with distinct separation of pedestrian and vehicular access. Poorly supervised approaches ultimately led to anti-social behaviour and environmental neglect.Brief 75 new houses & apartments Urban renewal associated with 60 existing courtyard houses New ‘Homezone’ street Landscaping of existing / new public streets, common courtyards & private gardens Parking, public lighting & services InfrastructureProject considerations Literary review to understand the ‘Radburn’ principle of the original scheme. Evaluation of current urban design models. Consultation with existing residents through community meetings and door-to-door surveys. Existing security and maintenance issues identified and addressed, e.g. problematic pedestrian through-routes, lack of clarity around ownership of outdoor spaces, poor surveillance of approaches, etc. Successful implementation of the ‘Homezone’ model which features shared pedestrian / vehicular surfaces.Project Value : €20.7 million (Incl. VAT)Floor Area: 5250m2 60 existing courtyard houses 75 new houses and apartments
  6. 6. 03YOUTH, SPORTS& RESIDENTIALDUBLIN, IRELAND
  7. 7. Senior Project Architect 2003 - 08Context Bluebell is a small inner city canal community in Dublin hemmed in on all sides by 2 highways and the Grand Canal. Despite its isolation (or perhaps because of it) a strong community spirit prevails in the face of anti social behaviour evident in the built environment. 9 different community groups joined forces to form a single steering group. Its primary objective… ‘We want to do something for our kids’.Brief Multi Purpose Sports Hall & Changing Rooms Reception & Community Offices Seminar Facilities Youth Workshop Rooms Commercial Kitchen / Kiosk 19 Residential Units Football pitch, cycle path, lighting, landscaping, parking & servicesProject considerations Inclusive design focus on youth at risk. Accessible sports facilities and adaptable housing. Feasibility study analyzed 3 potential sites. Consultation throughout all project stages with 9 different local community groups, individual youth workers and neighbouring householders. Assisted funding applications and met conditions of 3 separate funding authorities. Environmental impact studies on canal wildlife corridor. Assessment of structural approaches to large span Sports Hall. The building is due for construction completion in 2011 in accordance with the design and documents I finalised in 2008.Project Value & Floor Area Community Sports Centre: €4.71 million (ex-VAT) 1440m2 Residential Development by Private Developer 1900m2
  8. 8. 04‘THE OASIS’MIDDLEMOUNTQLD, AUSTRALIA
  9. 9. Principal Architect 2000Winner at The Royal Australian Institute of ArchitectsCentral Queensland Awards in 2000 The judge (Don Watson, Former Lecturer, UQ School of Architecture) described the result as a classic case of ‘making a silk purse from a sow’s ear’.Context Mining giant Cap Coal needed a very flexible venue in a ‘one-pub’ mining town. A challenging site, the starting point was the old mine-workers’ mess hall overlooking a gravel car park.Brief Versatile multifunction facility with restaurant for conferences, seminars, parties and even casual BBQs.Project considerations Company communication and training methods. Community leisure activities. Existing facilities survey. A progression of spaces of varying degrees of formality and enclosure created appropriate settings for diverse events ranging from corporate business meetings to informal sports club gatherings.Project value: AUD $250 000 AFTER (TOP LEFT) ‘The Oasis’ Function Facility. BEFORE (LEFT) The existing mine-worker’s Mess Hall overlooking the car park.
  10. 10. AFTER: Fixed and sliding screens provided various degrees of enclosure and formality required for different activities progressing from indoor seminarrooms and restaurant, to this outdoor room constructed around existing palms, and beyond to an open BBQ area.
  11. 11. 05SUSTAINABLEHOUSENORTH COASTNSW, AUSTRALIA
  12. 12. Principal Architect 2000Context A keen bush walker was determined to realise an idea conceived with her late husband – a ‘tree change’ move from town living to a bush block.Brief Indoor / outdoor lifestyle - ‘camping in comfort’ Sustainable construction and adaptable planning.Sustainable and adaptable features Adaptable planning for independent aging at home. Solar orientation and passive stack / cross ventilation. Rainwater and grey water collection. Low energy electrical and natural gas fittings. Low greenhouse gas emission materials, plantation timbers, biological paints, toxin free termite protection, etc.Project value: AUD $190 000
  13. 13. 06‘THE STADIUM’HERITAGE BARROCKHAMPTONQLD, AUSTRALIA
  14. 14. Principal Architect 2000Context Owner of a failing nightclub sought to expand & diversify patronage by refurbishment. The existing club lurked behind the neoclassical façade of a heritage listed warehouse on Rockhampton’s historic Quay Street.Brief High impact, cost effective transformation within 6 weeks. Attract broader patronage, extend opening hours to include day time.Project considerations Pre-design research into the building’s heritage values (Former Cahill Stores Warehouse. Architect: John W. Wilson. Late 19th Century Classical 1870s-1890s). Designed details to enable future reversal of alterations conserving existing facade materials and finishes. Defined existing and potential clientele, spending patterns and the nature of competing offers. Developed ‘The Stadium’ Sports Bar theme and implemented the concept through fit-out, lighting design and audiovisual technology. Met the 6 week deadline for the New Years Eve opening.Project value: AUD $500 000ABOVE + TOP LEFT: The heritage façade inspired a classical olympic sports theme.LEFT: In contrast, the interior time-warps to a contemporary streamlined video stadium.
  15. 15. 07HERITAGECITY HALLROCKHAMPTONQLD, AUSTRALIA
  16. 16. Principal Architect 1999Winner at the Queensland Customer Service Awards 2000Context Rockhampton City Hall is a fine example of Australian Academic Classical style, befitting of Central Queensland region’s major city. However, the existing facilities were failing to keep pace with the changing face of the City Council’s customer service.Brief Improve accessibility for people with disabilities Customer service counter Call centre Expansion and upgrade of info-tech servicesProject considerations Interviews with elected council, management and staff to identify and resolve diverse concerns and priorities. Assessed results of Council’s public surveys. Pre-design research into the building’s artistic and cultural heritage values (Architect: Hockings & Palmer. Inter war 1915-1940. Academic Classical style.) Designed details to enable future reversal of alterations, conserving existing marble, granite and timber interior finishes. Achieved an environment for award winning accessible customer service without compromising the building’s heritage value.Project value: AUD $400 000TOP LEFT: Rockhampton City Hall , Central QLD, AustraliaLEFT: New Customer Service Centre constructed in the existingbuilding’s entrance foyer
  17. 17. 08SACRED SPACEC.Q.U. ROCKHAMPTONQLD, AUSTRALIA
  18. 18. Principal Architect 1997Context Central Queensland University was keen to increase the number of overseas students on its campus. A lack of appropriate space for religious practice remained a deterrent for many prospective students.Brief A sacred space adaptable to the practices of all faiths on campus.Project considerations Survey of existing and potential religions on campus. Literary review on the essential beliefs, practices and typical architectural characteristics for each religion. Interviews with spiritual leaders on campus including: Aboriginal Dreaming, Baha’i, Buddhist, Christian, Hindu and Muslim.Project outcome Local representatives of one religion could not reconcile to the idea of a shared space. A scheme with two spaces evolved: one celebratory and the other contemplative. While all local interested parties were united in expressing enthusiasm for the concept, the various religious authorities declined to give financial support to the project unless the building were to be for the sole use of their own followers. The concept remains un-built.LEFT + TOP LEFT: A scheme with two spaces evolved: one celebratory and theother contemplative. Each wing could open to a central outdoor undercover‘breakout’ area which would link both buildings for large events.
  19. 19. 09WADJA WADJASCHOOLWOORABINDAQLD, AUSTRALIA
  20. 20. Principal Architect 1996Context Wadja Wadja is the secondary school of Woorabinda, an aboriginal community in Central Queensland.Brief The school required a culturally appropriate and robust building for teaching vocational skills of Manual Arts and Computer Science.Project considerations Interviewed teachers and parents to identify educational objectives and other concerns, such as low school attendance and regular break-ins. Designed strategies and details to incorporate security and anti- vandal measures for minimal impact on the design intent, i.e. a place to invoke curiosity, facilitate learning and creativity. Analysis to accommodate natural pedestrian movements around and through the school grounds which generally do not follow the town’s formal engineered vehicular routes and footpaths. Surveyed local skills and resources. Involved local artists and tradespersons during construction which created employment and facilitated easy ongoing maintainance.Project value: AUD $330 000Floor Area: 260m2TOP LEFT: Local artist Brian Fisher worked with children on this mural depicting thehistory of Woorabinda. Built-in seating provides resting places adjacent to informalpedestrian ways.LEFT: Steelwork details for fabrication by local steel-workers.
  21. 21. 10AGED CAREEMU PARKQLD, AUSTRALIA
  22. 22. Project Architect 1994Context The Country Women’s Association of a beachside township sought funding to accommodate older citizens, many of whom were living in substandard conditions with inadequate facilities for appropriate care.Brief 30 Accommodation Rooms Reception & Administration Offices Central Catering Kitchen Central Laundry Recreation & Function RoomProject considerations• Inclusive design for older people.• Meetings with department representatives to clarify government standards and funding conditions.• Interviews with staff of the existing facility about day to day operations.• Interviews with prospective residents on lifestyle issues .• Literature Review on Aged Care models.• The successful ‘cottage model’ development met government and staff expectations without compromise to residents’ crucial lifestyle concerns.Project value: AUD $2.2 millionFloor Area: 2310 m2LEFT: Shady verandas, deep eaves and vernacular details designed to evokememories of residents’ former Queensland homes.
  23. 23. MICHELLEMOOREARCHITECT Designs are copyright of the architectural practices as follows:10 PROJECTS Projects 1994-2000 © Bauhinia Architects Projects 2003-2008 © Fionnuala Rogerson ArchitectsBACKGROUND TOTHE INCLUSIVEMUSEUM PROJECThttp://au.linkedin.com/pub/michelle-moore/16/a28/6a1

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