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PowerPoint for History of Photography class

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Vasa 1

  1. 1. Expressive Photography When it’s not pictorial, notdocumentary, and not commercial, what is it?
  2. 2. ResourcesHeilbrun Timeline of Art•  http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/intro/atr/atr.htm•  A chronological, geographical, and thematic exploration of the history of art from around the world, as illustrated by the Metropolitan Museums collection.The George Eastman House Museum of Photography•  http://www.geh.org.Haus, Andreas and Frizot, Michael. “Figures of style: New Vision, New photography.” in A New History of Photography, ed. by Frizot, M. Chap 27, 457-467. KÖNEMAN, Koln, 1998.
  3. 3. “New Photography”Stieglitz Pictorial background Moholy-Nagy Bauhaus Minor White-Spiritual Callahan New Bauhaus-Inst. Design ↘ Laughlin-Spiritual Siskin-Institute of Design ⇓ F. Sommer-Self taught ⇔ Metzker-Institute of Design ↘ Meatyard-Self-taught Gibson-US Navy & self-taught
  4. 4. Stieglitz -- Equivalent
  5. 5. Stieglitz -- Equivalent
  6. 6. Minor White – Devil’s Slide
  7. 7. Minor White -- Wall
  8. 8. New BauhausLazlo Moholy-Nagy
  9. 9. Moholy-Nagy“Photogram”
  10. 10. Harry Callahan -- Eleanor
  11. 11. Harry CallahanLake Michigan
  12. 12. Aaron Siskind
  13. 13. Aaron Siskind
  14. 14. Ray Metzker – Man in the Canoe
  15. 15. Ray Metzker
  16. 16. Clarence John Laughlin Brick Wall
  17. 17. Clarence John Laughlin Hysteria
  18. 18. Frederick Sommer Chicken
  19. 19. Frederick Sommer Coyotes
  20. 20. Ralph Meatyard -- Mask
  21. 21. Ralph Meatyard -- Wings
  22. 22. Ralph Gibson
  23. 23. Ralph Gibson
  24. 24. Stieglitz•  The image captured not the thing, but the feeling he had at the time he tripped the shutter.•  Photography was not necessarily pictorial, straight, or documentary; it could be subjective and expressive.

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