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10 2010--welcome to the wonderful world of lds scouting, orientation & info ppp

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LDS Scouting Positions Orientation tool

LDS Scouting Positions Orientation tool

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10 2010--welcome to the wonderful world of lds scouting, orientation & info ppp 10 2010--welcome to the wonderful world of lds scouting, orientation & info ppp Presentation Transcript

  • Welcome to the Wonderful World of LDS SCOUTING
    1
  • Congratulations on your new calling to a
    Scouting position in the Church!
    If you are reading/viewing this presentation you either have a new calling and you are getting oriented or you are getting some training.
    Either way, this is a good start to getting the training you need to be the most effective Scout leader you can be.
    2
  • Contents, by Slides
    4 How to Use This Presentation
    5 An Orientation Tool
    6 A Few Things You Need to Know…
    7 A Brief History of the BSA
    8 A Brief History of Scouting and the LDS Church
    9-10 Scouting Ideals, Methods and Aims
    11-13 Some Differences Between LDS Scouting and “Traditional” Scouting
    14 Brother Deal’s Top 6 Tips
    15 The Role of the Chartered Organization and it’s leader, the Bishop
    16 In an Ideal World…umm…Ward
    17 List of Pack Positions
    18 List of Troop Positions
    19 List of Venturing Crew Positions
    20 Primary Leaders Roles
    21 Young Men’s Organization Leaders Roles
    22-24 The Chartered Organization Rep
    25-28 The Committee Chair and Committee Member
    29-35 The Cubmaster and Den Leaders
    36 The Den Chief
    37-39 The Scoutmaster
    40-42 The 11-yr Old Patrol Leader (Assistant Scoutmaster of the 11-yr Olds)
    43-45 The Assistant Scoutmasters and Junior Assistant Scoutmaster (JASM)
    46-48 The Venture Crew Advisor and Assistant Advisors
    49 Online Links and other Resources
    3
  • How to use this presentation
    While this presentation can be used as a training tool, it is primarily intended to be a New Leader Orientation tool for adult Scouting leaders (Scouters). See the contents slide for the location of position-specific slides which contain a job description, materials list, list of meetings to attend, who the position reports to, who supports it, handbooks and other literature needed, a training trail and a few notes on the differences between LDS scouting and “traditional scouting.”
    As a training tool the presentation is a precursor (not a replacement for) to the BSA training offered by your local BSA Council.
    A disc containing the presentation is included in the notebook.
    4
  • Orientation Tool
    To the Leader
    Before extending the call:
    Review the slides pertaining to the position to which you are calling the individual.
    Familiarize yourself with the boys that the new leader will have stewardship over.
    Understand what will be expected of the individual.
    Understand who will have stewardship over the individual in this calling.
    Understand the meetings that the individual will be expected to attend.
    Gather the required literature…BSA literature and LDS handbooks.
    At the time the call is extended:
    Explain the expectations of the calling, including meetings to attend and goals and objectives for the youth.
    Review the position-specific slides with the individual.
    Present the literature.
    Present a list of boys that the calling has stewardship over.
    Explain which organization and which organizional leader has responsibility over the position.
    5
  • A Few Things You Need to Know
    Most importantly, you need to know that you now have a wonderful opportunity to influence a boy or young man in a way that truly may change his life for the better.
    His experiences in Scouting will give him memories and positive reinforcements that he will always remember. Those memories and experiences will forever be linked to his feelings about the Gospel of Jesus Christ and the Church.
    Lastly, you need to know that Scouting in the Church is a little bit different than “traditional Scouting.” This presentation will outline some of the differences.
    6
  • Brief History of Scouting in America
    One Day in 1909 in London, England, an American visitor, William D. Boyce, lost his way in a dense fog. He Stopped under a street lamp to try to figure out where he was. A boy approached him and asked if he could be of help.
    "You certainly can," said Boyce. He told the boy that he wanted to find a certain business office in the center of the city.
    "I'll take you there," said the boy.
    When they got to the destination, Mr. Boyce reached into his pocket for a tip. But the boy stopped him.
    "No thank you, sir. I am a Scout. I won't take anything for helping."
    "A Scout? And what might that be?" asked Boyce.
    The boy told the American about himself and his brother Scouts. Boyce became very interested. After finishing his errand, he had the boy take him to the British Scouting office.
    At the office, Boyce met Lord Robert Baden-Powell, the famous British general who had founded the Scouting movement in Great Britain. Boyce was so impressed with what he learned that he decided to bring Scouting home with him.
    On February 8, 1910, Boyce and a group of outstanding leaders founded the Boy Scouts of America. From that day forth, Scouts have celebrated February 8 as the birthday of Scouting in the United States.
    7
  • History of Scouting and the LDS Church
    The Young Men's Mutual Improvement Association (YMMIA) was organized in June of 1875 by Junius F. Wells, under the direction of Brigham Young, to provide spiritual and cultural activities during leisure time for the young men of the Church.
    Scouting, with its spiritual background and cultural ideals, appealed to Church leaders as an excellent program for boys. The YMMIA thoroughly investigated Scouting in 1911, and, on motion of President Anthony W. Ivins of the YMMIA general superintendency, the MIA Scouts were officially organized.
    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints formally affiliated with the Scouting movement in the United States in May of 1913 as its first institutional sponsor, and today sponsors more Scouts and Scouting units in the United States than any other organization. Hundreds of thousands of young men are enrolled as Scouts in groups or units sponsored by the Church.
    The Church adopted Scouting as part of the activity program for Aaronic Priesthood quorums and later for Primary boys ages 8 and older. By providing opportunities for boys and young men to put into practice the gospel lessons they learn in the home and at Church, Scouting programs have supported the priesthood.
    8
  • Scouting
    The Aims of Scouting
    Growth in moral strength and character.
    Participating citizenship.
    Development in physical, mental, and emotional fitness.
    The Ideals of Scouting
    The Ideals of Scouting are found in the Oath, the Law, the Motto and the Slogan. A Scout measures himself against these Ideals.
    The Methods of ScoutingThe Methods of Cub Scouting
    Living the Ideals Using the Patrol Method
    Belonging to a Den Living the Ideals of Scouting
    Using AdvancementOutdoor Programs
    Involving Family and Home Using Advancement
    Participating in Activities Association with Adults
    Serving Neighborhood and Community Personal Growth
    Wearing the UniformLeadershipDevelopment
    Making Character Connections Wearing the Uniform
    9
  • The Scout Oath, Law, Motto & Slogan
    Scout Oath
    On my honor I will do my best to do duty to God and my country and to obey the Scout Law; to help other people at all times; to keep myself physically strong, mentally awake and morally straight.
    Scout Law
    A Scout is trustworthy, loyal, helpful friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent.
    Scout Motto
    Be prepared.
    Scout Slogan
    Do a good turn daily.
    10
  • Some Differences between LDS Scouting and “Traditional” Scouting
    No LDS Scouting activities are participated in on Sunday.
    LDS Cub Scout Packs do not include the Tiger Cub program.
    LDS Cubs do not participate in fundraising and they do not collect dues. The Pack activities are supported by the ward Primary budget.
    LDS Cub Scouts do not camp.
    11-yr Old Scouts are Boy Scouts, but in the Church they are part of the Primary Organization. The Primary Presidency is responsible for the program and a member of the presidency serves on the Troop committee.
    11-yr Old Scouts are only authorized to have 3 overnight campouts in a year. That is what they need to advance to First Class rank, which is their goal.
    11
  • Some More Differences between LDS Scouting and “Traditional” Scouting
    Traditional committees report to the Charter Holder and strongly frown upon one committee serving multiple units.
    All positions in traditional scouting units are volunteers, although many are recruited. In the Church, while adult leaders are volunteers, they are Called by the Bishopric to serve in Scouting positions.
    Women and girls do not participate in Scout Campouts. If the leader is a Sister, male leaders and/or fathers will camp with the boys.
    Non-church members are welcome and they are not to pay dues or fees to participate.
    The bishop may invite a non-member adult to be a Scout leader as long as the individual agrees to adhere to Church standards of conduct.
    12
  • Just a Few More Differences between LDS and “Traditional” Scouting
    In the Church all youth are registered in the unit that pertains to their age group. Youth advance (in Cub Scouts and from Cub Scouts to Boy Scouts) by age rather than school grade.
    LDS Venturing Crews are never co-ed while traditional crew gender restrictions are up to the Chartered Organization.
    LDS Crew youth leaders are recommended to the bishopric by the Crew Advisor, are called by the bishopric and sustained by the crew, which constitutes election.
    13
  • Brother Deal’s Top 6 Tips
    Read the current Church Scouting Handbook as soon as you receive your calling.
    Next read the Scouting sections of the Aaronic Priesthood & Primary Handbooks.
    Get “trained to position” through official BSA training as soon as possible.
    Seek the companionship of the spirit.
    Keep it about the boys & their needs as you implement the program as outlined in the Scouting Handbook.
    BSA and the Church allow some latitude to adjust the program to meet the needs of the boys and the situation of the chartered organization, BUT…be dedicated and disciplined and, as you are able, bring the program to the outline in BSA and LDS guides.
    14
  • Top Leadership & Their Duties
    The LDS Charter Owner (the Bishop or Branch President)
    Ensures that the charter renewal is applied for annually, usually at least a Pack and a Troop.
    Provides a safe place for the units to meet.
    Budgets financially for the units to operate.
    Identifies and calls individuals to fill the scouting positions in the Units that are chartered.
    Sees that the leaders are trained.
    Directs the program and provides direction to the leaders so that the program is administered to meet Church guidelines.
    15
  • In an Ideal World (Ward)
    Scouting Units
    Church Correlation
    Cub Pack*
    Scout Troop*
    Venture Crew
    Primary, boys 8-10.
    Primary for 11-yr boys; and Young Men's Org for boys 12-13 (if no Venture Crew,12-18).
    Young Men’s Org, boys 14-18.
    *Found in most regular, family wards and branches in the US.
    16
  • The Pack Positions
    • Pack Committee Chair
    • Pack Committee Members
    • Cubmaster
    • Wolf & Bear Den Leaders
    • Webelos Den Leader
    • Den Chief (Boy Scout, Youth)*
    • There are other optional positions
    *Optional positions.
    17
  • The Troop
    Troop Committee Chair
    Troop Committee Members
    Scoutmaster
    Assistant Scoutmasters
    Junior Assistant Scoutmaster* (Youth)
    11-yr Olds Scout Leader
    There are other optional positions
    *Optional positions.
    18
  • The Venturing Crew
    Crew Committee Chair
    Crew Committee Members
    Crew Advisor
    Crew Assistant Advisors
    Youth Leaders
    19
  • Primary Leaders Roles
    Primary President
    Responsible for the Cub Scout program
    Reports to the bishopric.
    Assigns a counselor to oversee the 8-10 year olds.
    Makes recommendations to the bishopric to consider for leader positions.
    Responsible for the 11-yr Old Scout Program
    Makes recommendations to the bishopric to consider for leader positions.
    Is a member of the Troop Committee.
    Encourages leaders to become trained to position.
    Primary Presidency Counselor Over 8-10 year olds
    Assigned by the Primary President to be over the Cub Scout program
    Is a member of the Pack Committee.
    Encourages leaders to become trained to position.
    20
  • Young Men’s Organization
    Bishopric
    Each member of the bishopric is assigned to a quorum with the bishop over the Priests, 1st counselor over Teachers and 2nd counselor over the Deacons.
    One counselor, typically 2nd, is usually the COR (chartered organization rep).
    Decides how Scouting in the ward will be organized and executed while taking into consideration Church and BSA guidelines and the needs of the youth.
    YM Presidency
    Reports to the bishopric and may fill the Scout leader positions.
    Responsible for administering the Troop and Venture Scouting programs, for administering the Young Mens Organization, and seeing that the two are appropriately intertwined.
    Assigns his two counselors to the quorums, usually the 1st and 2nd counselors are assigned to the Teachers and Deacons Quorums, respectively. And in turn to the Troop and Venturing units, respectively.
    YM Quorum Advisors
    Register as Assistant Scoutmasters or Venture Leaders.
    May be called to fill the Scout Leader positions.
    Report to the YM Presidency.
    Quorum Presidency Members (youth)
    Ideally fill the youth Scouting and Venturing positions as well as the Quorum Presidency postions.
    21
  • Chartered Organization Rep, the COR
    General Information: In the Church, the Charter Owner is the Bishop (or Branch President). The Bishop usually selects one of his counselors to be the COR.
    Objectives: The COR is key to the Scouting program on the ward level. He ensures that the Scouting program in the ward…all the chartered units…are administered according to the Church guidelines (first) as well as the BSA guidelines. Ensure that the committee meetings and Scouting meetings are held regularly. Encourage all leaders to become fully trained, including Youth Protection and position-specific training. Make recommendations for adult and youth leaders to the bishopric. Ensure leaders provide well planned activities that accomplish the purposes of the Church and BSA and help the boys be active in church and grow closer to the Savior. The COR represents the Chartered Organization to the District and Council. He may become a member of the District Committee and become a voting member of the Council.
    (continued next slide)
    22
  • Chartered Organization Rep. (cont.)
    Reports to: The Bishop, who is the Charter Owner.
    Supported by: The Bishop, the Unit Commissioner and other District Leaders.
    Manuals, handbooks and other literature needed: The Church Primary Handbook, the Aaronic Priesthood Handbook, the Scouting Handbook, and the BSA basic literature for the units that are chartered to that ward.
    Meetings: The monthly committee(s) meetings, monthly District roundtable meeting, monthly Pack Meeting, the units’ annual planning meetings, and District Committee meetings.
    (continued next slide)
    23
  • Chartered Organization Rep. (cont.)
    Training (*mandatory, ^necessary, °suggested): Take *Youth Protection Training (online, every 2 years). Then *Register with the BSA as an adult leader, then take the following courses:
    *This Is Scouting (online)
    ^Fast Start for your units (online)
    ^COR Training (taught by the District Executive in a group setting or individually…usually with the Chartered Organization Head)
    °Committee Challenge.
    Take 1-3 to be trained-to-position, authorized to wear the “Trained” patch, and to qualify for °Wood Badge. °Outdoor Leadership Skills (for Troops) and °Baloo (for Packs) are great for learning the boys’ programs, as are the other °leader-specific training courses.
    • Differs from traditional scouting units: Usually assigned to the position by virtue of his position in the Bishopric.
    24
  • Committee Chair
    General Information: While a Scout committee in a ward can serve more than one unit in the ward, the ideal setup is to have a committee for each unit (i.e. Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts, Venture Scouts). Each committee in the ward will have a chairperson.
    Objectives: The goal of the Committee Chair is to see that the committee helps the young men or boys who are assigned to that unit achieve the unit’s LDS Scouting purposes and help them earn their religious award. Ensure the charter is renewed correctly and timely each year.
    Reports to: The presidency of the Church organization to which the boys and/or young men in the unit are assigned and to the Chartered Organization Rep (the COR), who is a member of the bishopric.
    Supported by: The Primary Presidency, the COR and the Unit Commissioner. Unit Commissioners are usually appointed by the District and not a member of the ward.
    (continued next slide)
    25
  • Committee Chair (cont.)
    Manuals, handbooks and other literature needed: the Church’s Primary Handbook , the Aaronic Priesthood Handbook, the Scouting Handbook, the BSA Committee Guide, the handbook(s) that the boys in the committee’s unit use.
    Meetings: Monthly committee meeting, Monthly District Round Table.
    Training (*mandatory, ^necessary, °suggested): Take *Youth Protection Training (online, every 2 years). Then *Register with the BSA as an adult leader, then take the following courses:
    *This Is Scouting (online)
    ^Fast Start for your unit (online)
    ^Committee Challenge.
    Take 1-3 to be trained-to-position, authorized to wear the “Trained” patch, and to qualify for °Wood Badge. °Outdoor Leadership Skills (for Troops) and °Baloo (for Packs) are great for learning the boys’ programs.
    Differs from traditional scouting units:Traditional committees report to the Charter Holder. Traditional scouting allows for, but strongly frowns upon one committee serving multiple units…and it is not a desirable situation in LDS Scouting either.
    26
  • Committee Member
    General Information: While a Scouting committee in a ward can serve more than one unit in the ward, the ideal setup is to have a committee for each unit (i.e. Cub Scouts, Boy Scouts, Venture Scouts).
    Objectives: The goal of the Committee Member is to serve in a specific role on the committee. The Committee Members work together to ensure that the committee assists the young men or boys who are assigned to the unit to achieve that unit’s LDS Scouting purposes and help them earn their religious award.
    Reports to: The committee chair.
    The Committee Is Supported by: The Primary Presidency, the COR and the Unit Commissioner (usually appointed by the District and not a member of the ward).
    (continued next slide)
    27
  • Committee Member (cont.)
    Manuals, handbooks and other literature needed: The Church’s Primary Handbook, the Aaronic Priesthood Handbook, the Scouting Handbook, the BSA Committee Guide, and the BSA guide for the committee role in which you serve (training, advancement and finance are a few examples).
    Meetings: Monthly committee meeting, Monthly District Round Table.
    Training (*mandatory, ^necessary, °suggested): Take *Youth Protection Training (online, every 2 years). Then *Register with the BSA as an adult leader, then take the following courses:
    *This Is Scouting (online)
    ^Fast Start for your unit (online)
    ^Committee Challenge.
    Take 1-3 to be trained-to-position, authorized to wear the “Trained” patch, and to qualify for °Wood Badge. °Outdoor Leadership Skills (for Troops) and °Baloo (for Packs) are great for learning the boys’ program.
    28
  • Cubmaster
    Objectives: The Cubmaster sees that the Pack program is implemented to Church standards (first) and BSA standards. As the pack leader, the Cubmaster is the primary focus of the Cub Scout boys. Set the example by wearing the uniform and getting to know the Cubs. Conduct a monthly, fun, activity-filled Pack Meeting. Oversee rank advancement , including the Arrow of Light Award and the religious award. Direct and motivate the other leaders.
    Reports to: The Pack Committee Chair and the Primary President.
    Supported by: The Pack Committee and the Primary Presidency.
    Meetings: Monthly committee meeting, monthly district Roundtable, monthly Pack Meeting, annual Pack Planning Meeting.
    Manuals, handbooks and other literature needed: The Church Primary Handbook, the Scouting Handbook, the Faith in God for Boys guidebook, the Cub Scout Leader Book, the Pack and Den Meeting Resource Guide (replaces the Annual Cub Scouting Program Helps), the Cub Scout Leader How-to Book, Ceremonies for Dens and Packs, and Group Meeting Sparklers is a nice resource.
    (continued next slide)
    29
  • Cubmaster (cont.)
    Training (*mandatory, ^necessary, °suggested): Take *Youth Protection (online, every 2 years). Then *Register with the BSA as an adult leader and take the following courses:
    *This Is Scouting (online)
    ^Fast Start for your unit (online)
    ^Scout Master Leader Specific Training course
    Take 1-3 to be trained-to-position and to be authorized to wear the “Trained” patch. Take °Baloo training to qualify to take °Wood Badge.
    Differs from traditional scouting units: In traditional Cub Scouting the Primary organization does not direct Cub Scouts. LDS Cub Scouts do not participate in overnight camping, raise money, or pay dues and they advance by age rather than grade.
    30
  • Wolf & Bear Den Leaders(Tiger Cub dens are not supported)
    Objectives: Plan and conduct the weekly den meetings using the BSA program helps. As the direct leader of the boys in the den, the Den Leader sets the example by wearing the uniform and getting to know the boys. Follow Church guidelines (first) and BSA guidelines. Plan the den meetings well, making them fun and activity-filled. Ensure that the boys behave appropriately. Help them advance and earn the religious award. Read and use the manuals fully.
    Reports to: The Pack Committee and Primary presidency counselor over Cub Scouts.
    Supported by: The Cubmaster, the Pack Committee and the Primary presidency.
    (continued next slide)
    31
  • Wolf & Bear Den Leaders (cont.)
    Manuals, handbooks and other literature needed: The Church Primary Handbook, the Scouting Handbook, the Faith in God for Boys guidebook, the Wolf or Bear Handbook, the BSA Pack and Den Meeting Resource Guide (replaces the Annual Cub Scouting Program Helps), the Cub Scout Leader Book, and the Cub Scout Leader How-to Book.
    Training (*mandatory, ^necessary, °suggested): Take *Youth Protection (online, every 2 years). Then *Register with the BSA as an adult leader, then take the following courses:
    *This Is Scouting (online)
    ^Fast Start for your unit (online)
    ^Den Leader Specific Training course
    Take 1-3 to be trained-to-position and to be authorized to wear the “Trained” patch. Take °Baloo to qualify to take °Wood Badge.
    (continued next slide)
    32
  • Wolf & Bear Den Leaders (cont.)
    Meetings: Weekly den meetings, monthly committee meeting, monthly district Roundtable, monthly Pack Meeting, annual Pack Planning Meeting.
    Differs from traditional scouting units: LDS Cub Scouts do not participate in overnight camping.
    33
  • Webelos Den Leader
    Objectives: Plan and conduct the weekly den meetings using the BSA program helps. As the direct leader of the boys in the den, the Webelos Den Leader sets the example by wearing the uniform and getting to know the boys. Follow Church guidelines (first) and BSA guidelines. Plan the den meetings well, making them fun and activity-filled. Ensure that the boys behave appropriately. Help them advance and earn the Arrow of Light and the religious award. Read and use the manuals fully.
    Reports to: The Pack Committee and Primary presidency counselor over Cub Scouts.
    Supported by: The Cubmaster, the Pack Committee and the Primary presidency.
    (continued next slide)
    34
  • Webelos Den Leader
    Manuals, handbooks and other literature needed: The Church Primary Handbook, the Scouting Handbook, the Faith in God for Boys guidebook, the Webelos Handbook, the BSA Pack and Den Meeting Resource Guide (replaces the Annual Cub Scouting Program Helps), the Cub Scout Leader Book, and the Cub Scout Leader How-to Book.
    Training (*mandatory, ^necessary, °suggested): Take *Youth Protection (online, every 2 years). Then *Register with the BSA as an adult leader, then take the following courses:
    *This Is Scouting (online)
    ^Fast Start for your unit (online)
    ^Webelos Den Leader Specific Training course
    Take 1-3 to be trained-to-position and to be authorized to wear the “Trained” patch. Take °Baloo to qualify to take °Wood Badge.
    Differs from traditional scouting units: LDS Cub Scouts do not participate in overnight camping.
    35
  • Den Chief
    General Information: The Den Chief is a Boy Scout who assists in the den. It is an optional position in LDS units and traditional units. Many LDS Packs do not support utilizing Den Chiefs because the Scouts meet at the same time the Dens meet.
    Objectives: The Den Chief serves as the activities assistant at den meetings. He sets a good example through his attitude and wearing his uniform. He is a friend to the boys in the den. He helps lead the weekly den meetings and helps the den in its part of the monthly pack meeting.
    Reports to: The Den Leader
    Supported by: The Den Leader, Cubmaster and Scout Master.
    Manuals, handbooks and other literature needed: Den chief guidebook.
    Meetings: Weekly den meetings, his other Scout meetings.
    Training: Den Chief training course.
    Differs from traditional scouting units: In traditional units the Den Chief is selected by the SPL (Senior Patrol Leader) and Scout Master at the request of the Cubmaster.
    36
  • Scoutmaster
    Objectives: The Scoutmaster sees that the Troop program is implemented to Church standards (first) and BSA standards. He works hand-in-hand with the YM Presidency and helps to merge the two programs. He trains and helps the youth leaders to run the program. He oversees and encourages rank advancement, including the religious award. The Scoutmaster ensures that the youth leadership meetings are held regularly. He ensures Courts of Honor are timely and appropriate. He makes recommendations to the Bishopric for youth leadership positions.
    Reports to: The Young Men’s Presidency and the Troop Committee.
    Supported by: The Troop Committee, the Young Men’s Presidency, the Bishopric, the Unit Commissioner.
    (continued next slide)
    37
  • Scoutmaster (cont.)
    Manuals, handbooks and other literature needed: The Church Aaronic Priesthood Handbook, the Scouting Handbook, the BSA Scoutmaster Handbook, Troop Leadership Features, many other BSA publications are available.
    Training (*mandatory, ^necessary, °suggested): Take *Youth Protection Training (online, every 2 years). Then *Register with the BSA as an adult leader, then take the following courses:
    *This Is Scouting (online)
    ^Fast Start (online)
    ^Position-specific Scoutmaster Training
    °Outdoor Leadership Skills
    Take 1-3 to be trained-to-position and to be authorized to wear the “Trained” patch. 4 is needed to qualify for °Wood Badge.
    (continued next slide)
    38
  • Scoutmaster (cont.)
    Meetings: Monthly Troop committee meeting, monthly District roundtable, weekly troop meeting, monthly PLC (Patrol Leader Council) meeting, monthly PL (Patrol Leader) meeting, ward YM Presidency meeting as invited, ward Aaronic Priesthood Committee as invited.
    Differs from traditional scouting units: The SM is called by the Chartered Organization Head…the Bishopric. The troop receives a budget from the Chartered Organization and are only authorized to hold one fundraising activity per year. LDS Scouts do not camp over Saturday night, even for summer camp and do not travel on Sunday. Key youth leaders are chosen and called by the bishopric and sustained by the Troop members, which constitutes election.
    39
  • 11-yr Olds Scout Leader (Asst. SM over 11-yr Olds)
    General Information: The 11-yr Olds Scout Leader is registered as an assistant Scoutmaster over the 11-yr Old Patrol. While the patrol has a relationship with the Troop, and occasionally meets with the Troop (including Courts of Honor), the program is separate. The patrol, as a rule does not camp with the Troop. On the rare occasion that they do, the patrol should camp together, as a patrol, separate from the older boys.
    Objectives: The 11-yr Olds Scout Leader sees that the 11-yr Olds Scout program is implemented to Church standards (first) and BSA standards. He works under the direction of the Primary President. He trains and helps the youth leaders in the patrol to run the program. He oversees and encourages rank advancement, including the religious award. The 11-yr Olds Scout Leader ensures that the youth leadership meetings are held regularly. He makes recommendations to the Bishopric for youth leadership positions in the patrol.
    (continued next slide)
    40
  • 11-yr Olds Leader (cont.)
    Reports to: The Primary President and the Troop Committee.
    Supported by: The Primary Presidency, the Troop Committee and the Bishopric.
    Manuals, handbooks and other literature needed: The same as the Scoutmaster plus the Church’s Primary Handbook.
    Meetings: Monthly Troop committee meeting, monthly District roundtable, weekly 11-yr Olds Patrol meeting, monthly PL (Patrol Leader) meeting, and Primary Leadership meetings.
    (continued next slide)
    41
  • 11-yr Olds Leader (cont.)
    Training (*mandatory, ^necessary, °suggested): Take *Youth Protection Training (online, every 2 years). Then *Register with the BSA as an adult leader, then take the following courses:
    *This Is Scouting (online)
    ^Fast Start (online)
    ^Position-specific Scoutmaster/Asst Scoutmaster Training
    °Outdoor Leadership Skills
    Take 1-3 to be trained-to-position and to be authorized to wear the “Trained” patch. 4 is needed to qualify for °Wood Badge.
    Differs from traditional scouting units: The 11-yr Olds Scout Program is particular to LDS Scouting. While traditional Scout Troops usually have a new scout patrol they are organized as a patrol in the troop, coming under the direction of the SPL and Scoutmaster, meeting and camping with the troop.
    42
  • Assistant Scout Masters
    Information: In Scouting there is no limit of how many Assistant Scoutmasters can serve in a Troop. They fulfill 2-deep leadership requirements, overseeing patrols and other supporting roles as needed within the organization.
    Objectives: Fulfill 2-deep leadership requirements and other assignments as needed.
    Reports to: The Scoutmaster.
    Supported by: The Scoutmaster, the Troop Committee, the Bishopric.
    Manuals, handbooks and other literature needed: Same as the Scoutmaster.
    Meetings: Monthly Troop committee meeting, monthly District roundtable, weekly troop meeting, monthly PLC (Patrol Leader Council) meeting, monthly PL (Patrol Leader) meeting, ward YM Presidency meeting as invited, ward Aaronic Priesthood Committee as invited.
    (cont. next slide)
    43
  • Assistant Scout Masters (cont.)
    Training (*mandatory, ^necessary, °suggested): Take *Youth Protection Training (online, every 2 years). Then *Register with the BSA as an adult leader, then take the following courses:
    *This Is Scouting (online)
    ^Fast Start (online)
    ^Position-specific Scoutmaster Training
    °Outdoor Leadership Skills
    Take 1-3 to be trained-to-position and to be authorized to wear the “Trained” patch. 4 is needed to qualify for °Wood Badge.
    Differs from traditional scouting units: In LDS wards the members of the Young Men’s presidency and Quorum Advisors should be registered as Assistant Scoutmasters unless serving in another Scouting position to which they are registered.
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  • Junior Assistant Scout Master
    Objectives: As a youth of 16 or 17, the JASM sets the example to the younger scouts. He advises and assists the Scoutmaster in administering the program, helping with supervision, and supporting the younger boys in the troop. He adheres to all Youth Protection and 2-deep leadership principles, including overnight camping, driving, etc. The position is optional for troops.
    Reports to: The Scoutmaster and SPL (Senior Patrol Leader).
    Supported by: The scoutmaster.
    Meetings: Monthly PLC (Patrol Leaders’ Council), monthly PL (Patrol Leader meeting) as invited.
    Manuals, handbooks and other literature needed: There is no handbook for the JASM, but the SPL Guidebook is helpful.
    Training: TLT course (Troop Leadership Training).
    Differs from traditional scouting units: In LDS troops, the JASM is recommended by the Scoutmaster, approved by the bishopric. In traditional troops he is chosen by the SPL with Scoutmaster approval. The position is optional for LDS and traditional troops.
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  • Venturing Crew Advisor & Asst. Advisors
    Information: While Troops are intended to be youth-led (just as the AP Quorums), Venturing Crews are much more youth-leader oriented than Troops. Youth leaders conduct all meetings, receive position-specific training, and make the decisions of the crew. The adult leaders, Advisors, counsel with the youth leaders.
    Objectives: Crew Advisors and Asst. Crew Advisors ensure the youth leaders are fully trained and teach the youth leaders how to conduct meetings and all other aspects of leadership, decision making and activity planning. With the help of the Crew Committee, the Crew Advisors ensure that the youth leaders have access to the resources needed to be able to carry out their approved activities and plans, including finances, training, etc.
    Reports to: The Young Men’ Presidency, the Crew Committee and the Bishopric.
    Supported by: The Crew Committee, the Young Men’s Presidency, the Bishopric and the Unit Commissioner.
    (cont. next slide)
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  • Venturing Crew Advisor & Asst. Advisors (cont)
    Manuals, handbooks and other literature needed: The Church Aaronic Priesthood Handbook, the Scouting Handbook, the BSA Venturing Leader Manual, Venturing Leader Training with CD, other pertinent BSA publications.
    Training (*mandatory, ^necessary, °suggested): Take *Youth Protection Training (online, every 2 years). Then *Register with the BSA as an adult leader, then take the following courses:
    *This Is Scouting (online)
    ^Venturing Fast Start (online)
    ^Position-specific Training
    °Outdoor Leadership Skills
    Take 1-3 to be trained-to-position and to be authorized to wear the “Trained” patch. 4 is needed to qualify for °Wood Badge.
    (cont next slide)
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  • Venturing Crew Advisor & Asst. Advisors (cont)
    Meetings: Monthly Crew committee meeting, monthly District roundtable, regular Crew Leadership meeting, ward YM Presidency meeting as invited, ward Aaronic Priesthood Committee as invited.
    Differs from traditional scouting units: LDS Venturing Crews are never co-ed while traditional crew gender restrictions are up to the Chartered Organization. LDS Crew youth leaders are recommended to the bishopric by the Crew Advisor, are called by the bishopric and sustained by the crew, which constitutes election.
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  • Resources, Links
    Most of the information in this presentation was found in the resources listed
    LDS Aaronic Priesthood Handbook
    LDS Primary Handbook
    LDS Scouting Handbook
    BSA Scouting Guidebooks
    http://www.scouting.org
    http://www.ldsscoutertools.org
    http://www.ldsbsa.org
    http://scoutmaster.org
    http://lds.org
    http://www.scoutstuff.org
    http://meritbadge.org
    https://myscouting.scouting.org
    http://www.mcctraining.org
    http://mccscouting.org (Mecklenburg County Council, find local contacts and other useful links)
    http://www.centralnccouncilbsa.com (Central NC Council, find local contacts and other useful links)
    http://palmettocouncil.org (Palmetto Council, find local contacts and other useful links)
    Developed by Mike Deal, Stake Scouting Coordinator, 10-2010
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