• Save
Intro to inquiry
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Intro to inquiry

on

  • 8,853 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
8,853
Views on SlideShare
7,767
Embed Views
1,086

Actions

Likes
14
Downloads
0
Comments
4

15 Embeds 1,086

http://pypjourney.blogspot.com 1039
http://pinterest.com 12
http://www.pinterest.com 12
http://paper.li 7
http://translate.googleusercontent.com 2
http://web2ibclassroom.wikispaces.com 2
http://twitter.com 2
http://padlet.com 2
http://pypjourney.blogspot.in 2
http://p4tr1k.wikispaces.com 1
https://abs.twimg.com 1
https://si0.twimg.com 1
http://www.pypjourney.blogspot.com 1
http://webcache.googleusercontent.com 1
http://www.symbaloo.com 1
More...

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Intro to inquiry Intro to inquiry Presentation Transcript

  • Introduction to Inquiry Primary Years
  • What is inquiry?
  • What is inquiry? Inquiry is asking open ended questions to discover the information that you want to discover
  • What is inquiry? Please feel free to ask any questions you have during and after this presentation. There is no such thing as a silly question!
  • What is inquiry? Each of us comes here with different knowledge, experiences and skills. By asking questions, we can build on our current understanding and learn from each other.
  • What is inquiry?
    • ‘ Inquiry’ refers to Inquiry-based learning
  • What is inquiry?
    • ‘ Inquiry’ refers to Inquiry-based learning
    • Asking questions is at the heart of inquiry-based learning
  • What is inquiry?
    • ‘ Inquiry’ refers to Inquiry-based learning
    • Asking questions is at the heart of inquiry-based learning
    • We encourage students to ask questions that they care about in order to seek answers that they want to know about
  • What is inquiry?
    • ‘ Inquiry’ refers to Inquiry-based learning
    • Asking questions is at the heart of inquiry-based learning
    • We encourage students to ask questions that they care about in order to seek answers that they want to know about
    • Our role is to guide students in finding the answers themselves and encourage new questions along the way
  • What is inquiry?
    • ‘ Inquiry’ is driven by learner’s questions rather than teacher’s lessons
  • What is inquiry?
    • ‘ Inquiry’ is driven by learner’s questions rather than teacher’s lessons
    • Learning is ‘constructivist’: we construct meaning by revising, extending and building on prior knowledge and experience
  • What is inquiry?
    • ‘ Inquiry’ is driven by learner’s questions rather than teacher’s lessons
    • Learning is ‘constructivist’: we construct meaning by revising, extending and building on prior knowledge and experience
    • Rather than only remembering information, students learn how to learn through developing the necessary skills needed to find answers to their questions
  • Skills: learning how to learn
    • Social skills
    • Communication skills
    • Thinking skills
    • Research skills
    • Self-management skills
  •  
  • I suggest a bilingual display in each classroom. It is useful for teachers when making observations and doing assessments, and it can also be used to motivate the students and keep them focused.
  • Traditional v Inquiry?
    • Traditionally, teachers and students have no control over curriculum or learning
  • Traditional v Inquiry?
    • Traditionally, teachers and students have no control over curriculum or learning
    • The traditional learning objectives are designed far from the classroom (so do not take into account student interest, enthusiasm, individual learning style, etc)
  • Traditional v Inquiry?
    • Traditionally, teachers and students have no control over curriculum or learning
    • The traditional learning objectives are designed far from the classroom (so do not take into account student interest, enthusiasm, individual learning style, etc)
    • May use inappropriate materials*
  • Traditional v Inquiry?
    • Traditionally, teachers and students have no control over curriculum or learning
    • The traditional learning objectives are designed far from the classroom (so do not take into account student interest, enthusiasm, individual learning style, etc)
    • May use inappropriate materials*
    • Focus on storing information and teaching for the test
  • Traditional v Inquiry?
    • Through inquiry all teachers and students have ownership of the curriculum and the learning processes*
  • Traditional v Inquiry?
    • Through inquiry all teachers and students have ownership of the curriculum and the learning processes*
    • Students formulate their own questions and discover the answers that they are interested in
  • Traditional v Inquiry?
    • Through inquiry all teachers and students have ownership of the curriculum and the learning processes*
    • Students formulate their own questions and discover the answers that they are interested in
    • Teachers facilitate, coach, guide and assist
  • Traditional v Inquiry?
    • Through inquiry all teachers and students have ownership of the curriculum and the learning processes*
    • Students formulate their own questions and discover the answers that they are interested in
    • Teachers facilitate, coach, guide and assist
    • Teachers are not the font of knowledge – the knowledge is out there; teachers help students to discover it
  • Inquiry: Summary
    • Inquiry based learning is a technique whereby a teacher involves students in the learning process through focusing on questions, through problem-solving activities, and the use of critical thinking.
  • Inquiry: Summary
    • Inquiry based learning is a technique whereby a teacher involves students in the learning process through focusing on questions, through problem-solving activities, and the use of critical thinking. Some students prefer this type of learning approach because when they become involved they understand concepts better.
  • Inquiry: Summary
    • Inquiry based learning is a technique whereby a teacher involves students in the learning process through focusing on questions, through problem-solving activities, and the use of critical thinking. Some students prefer this type of learning approach because when they become involved they understand concepts better. While inquiry-based learning obviously works well in science, consider how you can use this approach for all subjects.
  • The Inquiry Process Inquiry: a basic model
  • Different words may be used, but the general process is the same: Define – focus Locate – find Select – choose Organize – order Create – share Evaluate – check
  • Inquiry: a basic model
    • Defining – what do we want to learn
    • The teaching team analyze the transdisciplinary theme, create a concept driven central idea and lines of inquiry, and formulate guiding questions in order to encourage students to ask their own questions: creating learner relevance, significance, interest and enthusiasm
  • Inquiry: a basic model
    • Defining – what do we want to learn
    • The teacher questions guide the inquiry and give it structure. The student questions generate understanding and should be explored as much as possible. However, the teacher is the facilitator/coach/guide and is responsible for keeping a focus on the central idea (the BIG IDEA we want students to understand after 6 weeks)
  • Inquiry: a basic model
    • Defining – what do we want to learn
    • We begin by provoking interest and informally analyzing student prior learning: we can do this by bringing a related item to class*, by telling a related story, or watching a related movie, by playing communication games, by showing a picture, listening to a CD, and by simply having a discussion with the students…
  • Inquiry: a basic model
    • Defining – what do we want to learn
    • No we can look at formally collecting information about student prior learning: KWL chart KWHL chart, KWL bank (graphic related to central idea*) group-work presentations, jigsaw activities*, drawings, summaries, worksheets appropriate to their expected prior learning* - formative assessment #1
  • Inquiry: a basic model
    • Locating – identifying resources
    • After the initial formative assessments, teachers will begin asking questions and eliciting further questions. Now the inquiry begins! The teacher sets up the activities and discusses the resources/sources of information that can be used
  • Inquiry: a basic model
    • Locating – identifying resources
    • Human resources: asking other people, interviewing, doing surveys and questionnaires, observing people
    • Print media – books, magazines, newspapers
    • Visual Media – TV, DVD, Videotape
    • Audio – CD, audio-books, music
    • ICT – internet, applications, digital media
  • Inquiry: a basic model
    • Selecting – choosing the best information and forming ideas
    • Investigating and determining the most useful information – this information may lead to further questioning and further exploration and discovery of new and useful information. All useful information is recorded in note form or by completing tables/diagrams, etc
  • Inquiry: a basic model
    • Organizing – using the information to support your ideas
    • Combine the information and arrange it in the correct sequence: structure the argument that will support your ideas. This could be the preparation and planning stage for a group project, demonstration, performance, etc.
  • Inquiry: a basic model
    • Creating – sharing the information to prove your ideas
    • Sharing, displaying, performing, presenting, instructing, demonstrating, debating, etc.
    • This is the evidence of understanding. It may be a formative assessment leading to further inquiry, or the summative assessment at the end of the unit
  • Inquiry: a basic model
    • Evaluating – looking back on the learning processes and learning from our learning
    • Appraising strengths and weaknesses, the value of the processes and the final product: self-assessment/peer assessment and how can we improve on the above
  •  
  • 10 Tips Inquiry-based learning
  • #1 Tip for Inquiry-based learning:
    • Give yourself time to prepare. It is important to give yourself proper time when preparing such lessons. You want to be sure that you are able to guide your students through the process and have proper closure to the lesson with the students' full understanding.
    • Remember: ‘Quality over quantity’
  • #2 Tip for Inquiry-based learning:
    • Using collaborative learning. Inquiry-based learning generally works best in a collaborative setting. Try dividing your class into small groups. Give each group a question that they will work on together, and then let them develop a group project
    • Team teaching*
  • #2 (continued) Teaching strategies
    • Independent activities
    • Pairing
    • Cooperative learning (group-work, presentations, dramas, role-plays, etc)
    • Hands-on activities (making things, experiments, conducting surveys, collecting materials, etc)
    • Split class activities
    • Centres
  • #3 Tip for Inquiry-based learning
    • Age-appropriate activities. This approach to learning works well with any age group and with any subject. The key is to make sure that you develop lesson plans that are age-appropriate. Since much of the planning falls on your shoulders, you need to keep your students abilities in mind at all times
    • Remember to extend and build on prior-knowledge
  • #4 Tip for Inquiry-based learning
    • Developing good questions. Because inquiry-based learning is based on answering questions, your job is to develop strong questions that are applicable to your lessons. Make sure your questions are open-ended. Also, the purpose of your questions is to promote further questions from students. So, be sure to model good, open and concept based questioning*
  • #5 Tip for Inquiry-based learning
    • Incorporate discovery into lessons. By using our concept based lines of inquiry and teacher questions, our students are encouraged to explore to find the answers. Giving students a chance to discover things on their own can lead to greater conceptual understanding: they may have to research, build, interview, survey, map, measure, locate, create, assemble, explore, role-play, etc.
  • #6 Tip for Inquiry-based learning
    • Incorporate observation into assessment. Observing the learning processes and student dynamics provides the teacher with valuable information as to how students are developing: both academically and personally. Anecdotal records are kept that are used to monitor development of the 5 essential elements.
    • May also be used to improve future planning and learning when the unit is revisited
  • #7 Tip for Inquiry-based learning
    • Incorporate hands-on activities in lessons. Any opportunity to let students work with their hands is a good way to use inquiry-based learning. Hands-on activities can be used in all subjects. Anything that involves the students physically designing, building, experimenting, problem-solving (using materials) is hands-on.
  • #8 Tip for Inquiry-based learning
    • Attempt to keep the learning processes informal. Inquiry-based learning is structured learning; however, if the questioning takes you in another direction which is still significant and relevant to the central idea, go with it. It is up to us as teachers to guide the inquiry, but, ultimately, the end product and understanding will be a consequence of the students’ desire to learn
  • #9 Tip for Inquiry-based learning
    • Celebrate the learning experience. Teachers and students have ownership of their learning. You work together to produce wonderful evidence of learning: celebrate this learning by displaying work, giving performances, inviting other classes in to view your work, and being proud of your achievements
  • #9 Tip for Inquiry-based learning
    • Plan collaboratively. Every teacher comes from a different background, has different life experiences, has acquired different knowledge and life-skills, and has valuable contributions to give to the PYP. Try to include the whole grade level teaching team when planning units of inquiry: ‘six heads are better then one!’
  • #10 Tip for Inquiry-based learning
    • Extend the learner community. Typically we think of the school as the learner community, but we can extend to the home and the local community. When possible, take students out into the local community to visit places that will compliment the unit of inquiry, or invite experts in to the school. Invite parents to come and talk to the students about their occupations, family histories, etc.
  • Useful websites:
    • www.ibo.org (click on Online Curriculum Centre & login with your username & password)
    • http://www.craftsforkids.com/projects.htm
    • www.primaryresources.co.uk
    • http://www.gokids.com.au
    • www.emints.org (click on e-themes)
    • www.pbs.org (click on pbs teachers)
    • www.readwritethink.org
  • www.google.com www.wikipedia.org
    • Search for:
    • Constructivism
    • Inquiry-based learning
    • Task-based learning
    • Hands-on activities
    • Writing across the curriculum
    • Integrated subject teaching
  • Introduction to Inquiry Primary Years THANK YOU