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Inquiry Unit Stages (simplified)
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Inquiry Unit Stages (simplified)

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Inquiry Unit Stages (simplified) Inquiry Unit Stages (simplified) Presentation Transcript

  • INQUIRY Week 1-6
  • Inquiry Stages
    • One theme
    • One central idea
    • 3-4 lines of inquiry
    • 3 concepts
    • All subjects (plan, teach + assess)
    • 6 weeks
  •  
  •  
  •  
  • 6 stages (6 weeks)*
    • What do I know?
    • What do I want to know?
    • How do I find out?
    • What did I learn?
    • How do I use/share what I learned
    • How do I know what I learned?
  • INQUIRY Stage 1
  • Provocation
    • Theme (decorate) the classroom
    • Related pictures and vocabulary
    • Real world items
    • Books & magazines
    • Posters
    • Unit information clearly displayed
  • What do I know?
    • “ How might we know what we have learned?”
    • Pre-assessment
    • What do students already know?
    • What misunderstandings do they have?
    • Prepare to build on knowledge
  • What do I know?
    • “ How might we know what we have learned?”
    • Movies, stories, pictures
    • Discussions
    • Brainstorming
    • Presentations and feedback
    • Vocabulary map (and categorizing)
  • What do I know?
    • “ How might we know what we have learned?”
    • Brainstorm: blackboard or big sheets of paper, create a game, students present and friends ask or challenge.
    • Tell a related story (make it up).
  •  
  • Wall Diary
    • Recording student understanding
    • Not for displayed work
  • Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Week 6
  • Week 1 Week 2 Week 3 Week 4 Week 5 Week 6
  • Stage 1
    • Evidence of student knowledge
    • Correct or incorrect we still display it (as we can learn from mistakes and build on knowledge)
    • Words, pictures, and real world things collected by students
    • Useful information
    • Useful website addresses
    • Student questions
  • Stage 1
  • Stage 1
  • Stage 1
  • INQUIRY Stage 2
  • Stage 2
    • What do I want to know?
    • Review….
  • Stage 2
    • Review stage 1
    • Discuss what students already know
    • Discuss if everyone agrees if knowledge is correct
    • “Do we know all there is to know?”
    • Who, What, Where, When, Why, & How?
  • Stage 2
    • Discuss with students and write questions on the board – are these good questions?
    • Students work in groups to write new questions – are these good questions?
    • Post-it questions on the wall
  • Stage 2
    • Introduce the 3 main concepts
    • Use the students’ questions to formulate concept questions
    • Discuss the questions – are they good questions? Are they open-ended questions?
  • Stage 2
    • Introduce the teacher’s concept questions
    • Compare to students questions
    • Discuss which are the best questions to use for the unit of inquiry (you will probably use and answer most of the questions through the 6 weeks)
  • INQUIRY Stage 3
  • Stage 3
    • How do I find out?
    • Review stage 2
  •  
  • Stage 3
    • Who
    • What
    • Where
    • When
    • Why
    • How
  • Stage 3
    • Who knows about this theme?
    • Who has experience of this theme?
    • Who can help us to find information about this theme?
    • Who can we interview?
    • Who can we email?
    • Who can we telephone?
    • Who can we visit?
  • Stage 3
    • What books can we use?
    • What technology could we use?
    • What internet sites can we view?
    • What key words could we use?
    • What TV channels could we watch?
    • What movies could we watch?
    • What things could we bring to class?
  • Stage 3
    • Where can we find information?
    • Where can we find the technology?
    • Where can we find the people?
    • Where can we experience/do this?
    • Where can we observe this?
    • Where can we borrow an item from?
  • Stage 3
    • When is the library open?
    • When can we use the computers?
    • When can we interview people?
    • When can experts come to class?
    • When can we go outside and explore?
    • When …?
  • Stage 3
    • Why are we looking for this information?
    • Why would we use this book?
    • Why would we use these websites?
    • Why would you use this technology?
    • Why would you interview this person?
    • Why would you visit this place?
    • Why ..?
  • Stage 3
    • How do we find information in the library?
    • How do we search the internet?
    • How do we use key words?
    • How do we evaluate websites?
    • How do we contact experts?
    • How do we use technology?
    • How do we record our findings?
  • Stage 3 (part 2)
  • INQUIRY Stage 4
  • Stage 4
    • Review stage 3
    • What did I learn?
  • Stage 4
    • Students work in groups to share and organize their information
    • At this time, we can assess skills and attitudes as students select and organize their information
  • Stage 4
    • The information is shared/presented to the rest of the class
    • The purpose of this is to check student understanding
    • The teacher observes for misunderstandings and encourages students to ask questions or make challenges
  • Stage 4
    • Clearly, it is an advantage if different groups are presenting different information as this leads to further understanding
    • The method of presentation may also be different – multiple intelligences
  • Stage 4
  • Stage 4
    • Formative (continuous) assessment:
    • During research
    • During information organization
    • During information sharing
  • 3-4 lines of inquiry
  • INQUIRY Stage 5
  • Stage 5
    • Review stage 4
    • How do I use/share what I have learned?
  • Stage 5
    • During this stage, students will create a final presentation or performance for the summative (end of unit) assessment
  • Stage 5
    • The summative assessment could be:
    • A ‘polished’ version of stage 4
    • An extension of stage 4
    • A combination of presentations from stage 4
    • Individual creations adapted from stage 4
    • Complete revision and new product
    • Combination of above
  • Stage 5
    • Assessment
    • Rubrics
    • Checklists
    • Shared criteria
    • Portfolios
    • Multiple Intelligences
  • INQUIRY Stage 6
  • Reflection
    • Thinking about our thinking
    • Learning about our learning
    • Learning how we learn
  • Stage 6
    • Review stages 1-5 (can lead to further presentations)
    • Discuss all of the challenges, problems, successes and performances
    • Work with language teachers to support writing reflections (display & portfolio)
  • Stage 6
    • Now is the time to update displays and portfolios
    • Unit process and product is displayed in the corridor (with student reflections )
    • Classroom is prepared for next unit
    • Plan the above activities into your teaching schedule and encourage students to help