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Civic engagement
 

Civic engagement

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  • Civic engagement, the first identified need for this project, centers on education for participatory democratic citizenship, which has long been one of the primary purposes of schooling in the United States (Hahn &Torney-Purta, 1999 ).
  • Critical literacy is the second area of need addressed by this project. From the ability to make one’s mark-- a scrawled X on a legal document-- to attaining certain scores on standardized tests or discovering that a business deal depends on the ability to text-message rapidly translated negotiations with associates halfway around the world, as social, political, and technological changes have led to major shifts in the knowledge and skill necessary to succeed in life According to the National Adult Literacy Survey (NALS), which gives attention to the connections between literacy skills and social and economic variables such as voting, economic status, weeks worked, and earnings reported, “Literacy is a currency in this society.
  • Engaging students in real world community- based problems situates learning in contexts that personalize social action and mediate the development of knowledge and skills in social contexts that promotes a self-efficacy that is likely McCrary& Wood, 2010 to extend beyond adolescence to adulthood. Such generative learning can have long-term impact for the common good of communities in Kentucky (McCrary, 2002).
  • Setting for 2011 Pilot Study: Target three diverse Kentucky districts 8 th Graders Social Studies or Language Arts teachers
  • The groups gather information about the issue, examine policies and develop an action plan detailing the steps that need to be taken to have the appropriate school, government or other entity implement their public policy proposal.
  • The groups gather information about the issue, examine policies and develop an action plan detailing the steps that need to be taken to have the appropriate school, government or other entity implement their public policy proposal.
  • The groups gather information about the issue, examine policies and develop an action plan detailing the steps that need to be taken to have the appropriate school, government or other entity implement their public policy proposal.
  • Describe project
  • Research on youth-related programs designed with a cultural arts format have received tremendous interest, support, and financial funding from federal and local agencies, corporate donations, and other private parties as they have demonstrated the ability to social, vocational, and emotional skills that foster self-esteem, self-efficacy, and so on.
  • You may remember, for example, the story about a teacher and 150 teens who used writing to change themselves and the world around them

Civic engagement Civic engagement Presentation Transcript

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  • Mendy Mehan Curriculum Development Kentucky Department of Education
  • Susan Nelson Wood [email_address] Associate Professor Nancye McCrary [email_address] Assistant Professor Kate Larken [email_address] 2010 Kentucky Foundation for Women Sallie Bingham Award Recipient Thanks to Ashley Dimkich!
  • Nancye McCrary
    • A free society depends on the knowledge, skills, dispositions, and social action of its citizens
    • (Hahn, 1998; Parker, 2006)
    • Documented decline in the civic ethic among our citizens
    • (Gimpel, Lay, &Schuknecht, 2003; National Commission on Civic Renewal, 1998)
    • Citizens in the United States learn about pluralist, participatory democracy through actual participation in civic organizations
    • (Parker, 2006)
  • Susan Wood
    • What it means to be literate has evolved
    • (Wood, Steadman, and Simmons 2010)
    • The definition of literacy has expanded
    • (Gee, 2003)
    • The definition of text broadened to include a vast array of non-print text
    • (Kress, 2003)
    • Limited literacy skills impact job advancement, consumer decision making, citizenship, and so on
    • (Kirsch, Jungeblut, Jenkins, & Kolstad,1993)
  •  
    • In the time since KERA was enacted, many critical educational issues remain in Kentucky, including:
    • Increase in the perception that students are missing out on basic skills
    • Decrease in parental involvement at the local level
    • (Kannapel, 1997)
    • “ Writing communication is not limited to writing on paper. It can be developed through digital text, multi-media presentations, speeches, voice recordings, on-line communications, and other mediums.
    • “ Each school-based decision making council . . . shall adopt policies that determine the writing program for its school.”
    • Economy
    • Environment
    • Government
    • Communities
    • Education
    *Kentucky Long-Term Policy Research Center’s Biennial Trends Report (2008)
    • Economy
    • Environment
    • Government
    • Communities / Civic Engagement
    • Education / Critical Literacy
    • *Kentucky Long-Term Policy Research Center’s Biennial Trends Report (2008)
  • Acting for the Common Good and Engaging Early Adolescents in Democratic Citizenship through Writing, New Media, and the Arts
  •  
    • Student sample, Perry County
    CIVIC ENGAGEMENT
  • Project Citizen teams identify and analyze issues and problems facing their communities and address one of the issues for their project. The issue or problem must be one that could be addressed through public policy, such as a law or regulation. The final product is a stand-up portfolio displaying each group’s work and an accompanying binder documenting its research.  
  • Project Citizen teams identify and analyze issues and problems facing their communities and address one of the issues for their project. The issue or problem must be one that could be addressed through public policy, such as a law or regulation. The final product is a stand-up portfolio displaying each group’s work and an accompanying binder documenting its research.  
  • Project Citizen teams identify and analyze issues and problems facing their communities and address one of the issues for their project. The issue or problem must be one that could be addressed through public policy, such as a law or regulation. The final product is a stand-up portfolio displaying each group’s work and an accompanying binder documenting its research.  
    • Public Education
    • Democratic Citizenship
    • ...our relationship with the learners demands that we be aware of the concrete conditions of their world, the conditions that shape them. To try to know the reality that our students live is a task that the educational practice imposes on us.
    • Without this, we have no access to the way they think, so only with great difficulty can we perceive what and how they know (Freire, 1998).
  •  
    • Art-First Young Women’s Art Project
    • Urban Improv A Changed World
    • National Arts and Youth Demonstration Projects
    ARTS & HUMANITIES
    • The arts are symbol systems that permit us to give representation to our ideas, concepts, and feelings in a variety of forms that can be "read" by other people. The arts were invented to enable us to react to the world, to analyze it, and to record our impressions so that they can be shared.
    • Charles Fowler, 1991
  • WRITING
    • Students define community issues,
    • determine the focus of their service, and
    • direct the project’s content.
    • It is their interest, their voices, and their
    • decisions that drive the work.
    • interact with the larger community,
    • develop compelling performances,
    • communicate their findings.
    • Younger siblings, peers, elders, neighbors, and local officials are expected to increase their awareness, be motivated to action, and grow as civic leaders in their own right.
  • Identify unique and innovative ways to promote, empower and perpetuate participation by citizens everywhere in the civic spectrum ∧ Planning
  • Phase Stage Month Phase One Planning August –September 2010 Phase Two Curriculum Development October – December 2010 Phase Three Teacher Training and Implementation January – May 2011 Phase Four Analysis and Dissemination June – July 2011
  •  
    • Freire:
    • Dialogue
    • Reading the Word— Reading the World
    • Eisner:
    • Forms of Representation & Expression
    • Aesthetic Motivation
    • Moffett:
    • Theories of Distancing and Abstraction
  •  
    • Civic
    • Citizenship
    • Social Studies
    • Social Justice
    • Arts
    • Humanities
    • Writing
    • Engagement
    • Kentucky Department of Education
    • School districts
    • Project Citizen
    • Kentucky Educational Television
    • Arts organizations & facilities (museums, etc)
    • Students– 8 th grade, undergraduate, graduate
    • YOU!
  •  
  • Redefining Learning: Inquiry Learning Critical Thinking Dialogic Interaction Reflective Thinking Collaborative Learning Service Learning
    • People of all ages can feel
    • UNINFORMED
    • UNINITIATED
    • UNWELCOME
    • UNENTITLED
    • DISENFRANCHISED
    • POWERLESS
    • EXCLUDED
    • Workers, students, citizens, specialists, generalists, activists, artists … all must be ENGAGED in order to participate and contribute fully at all levels across the spectrum: from the smallest neighborhood to the global community.
    • Engagement grows from knowledge, practice, confidence and inclusion.
    • Engagement EMPOWERS.
  •