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Addressing HFCs Under the Montreal Protocol and Indo-US Task Force on HFCs
Addressing HFCs Under the Montreal Protocol and Indo-US Task Force on HFCs
Addressing HFCs Under the Montreal Protocol and Indo-US Task Force on HFCs
Addressing HFCs Under the Montreal Protocol and Indo-US Task Force on HFCs
Addressing HFCs Under the Montreal Protocol and Indo-US Task Force on HFCs
Addressing HFCs Under the Montreal Protocol and Indo-US Task Force on HFCs
Addressing HFCs Under the Montreal Protocol and Indo-US Task Force on HFCs
Addressing HFCs Under the Montreal Protocol and Indo-US Task Force on HFCs
Addressing HFCs Under the Montreal Protocol and Indo-US Task Force on HFCs
Addressing HFCs Under the Montreal Protocol and Indo-US Task Force on HFCs
Addressing HFCs Under the Montreal Protocol and Indo-US Task Force on HFCs
Addressing HFCs Under the Montreal Protocol and Indo-US Task Force on HFCs
Addressing HFCs Under the Montreal Protocol and Indo-US Task Force on HFCs
Addressing HFCs Under the Montreal Protocol and Indo-US Task Force on HFCs
Addressing HFCs Under the Montreal Protocol and Indo-US Task Force on HFCs
Addressing HFCs Under the Montreal Protocol and Indo-US Task Force on HFCs
Addressing HFCs Under the Montreal Protocol and Indo-US Task Force on HFCs
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Addressing HFCs Under the Montreal Protocol and Indo-US Task Force on HFCs

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  • Replace HFC-134a with HFO-1234yf in MVAC, isobutane in household refrigerators and freezers, and propane in retail refrigerators and freezers. Numbers are per year at some date in future – not meant to be cumulative….numbers would increase as market increases Assume a transition over time from HFC-134a (GWP of 1430) to: - HFO-1234yf, with same charge size as for 134a and GWP=4 (MVAC) (assume consistent with F-gas rule so 2011-2017 timeframe) isobutane, with reduced charge size of 50 g (compared to 125 g for HFC-134a), and GWP=8 (Household refrigerators/freezers) propane, with reduced charge size of 90 g (compared to 220 g for HFC-134a), and GWP=3 (Commercial freezers) Background: European directive restricts future use of high-GWP refrigerants in car A/C systems Current HFC phaseout in EU from 2011-2017 U.S. car manufacturers examining options, including CO 2 Moving to low-GWP alternatives: a positive step for climate Action: Allow safe use of CO 2 refrigerant as option for new car A/C systems Final rule at OMB since 2007 Annual climate benefits: 14 MMTCO 2 E emissions avoided
  • Transcript

    • 1. Addressing HFCs Under the Montreal Protocol and Indo-U.S. Task Force on HFCs
      Dr. John E. Thompson Cindy Newberg Deputy Director Chief, Alternative and Emissions Office of Environmental Policy Reduction Branch U.S. Department of State US Environmental Protection Agency
    • 2. Scope of Presentation
      • Rationale for Action
      • Status of Alternatives
      • 2010-2011 North American Amendment Proposal Overview
      • Indo-U.S. Task Force on HFCs
    • 3. Projected HFC Growth:
      PNAS, 2009, Velders, et al U.S. EPA, 2009 HFC growth linked to ODS phaseout, expanding availability of air conditioning & refrigeration
    • 4. Many Substitutes Available and More on the Way
      • “ The ultimate choice of technology to phase-out HCFCs will be based on ozone depletion and also climate impact, health, safety, affordability and availability, as Decision XIX/6 requires”
          • May 2010 TEAP XXI/9 Task Force Report
          • Assessment Of HCFCs and Environmentally Sound Alternatives
      • 2011 TEAP Assessment Report
        • Low GWP substitutes for many sectors and sub-sectors available
        • Additional substitutes under development
        • Global acceptance for alternatives strengthening
    • 5. Relationship between ODS and Other Greenhouse Gases Ozone Depleting Substances (Halogen Gases) Greenhouse Gases CFCs Halons HFCs HCFCs HFC-23 HFC-134a HFC-125 CO 2 CH 4 SF 6 PFCs N 2 O CFC-113 CFC-12 CFC-11 H-1211 H-1301 Carbon Tetrachloride (CCl 4 ) Methyl Chloride (CH 3 Cl) Methyl Bromide (CH 3 Br) Methyl Chloroform (CH 3 CCl 3 )
    • 6. Identifying Safer Alternatives
      • USEPA evaluates & lists ODS substitutes that reduce overall risk to human health & environment
      • Significant New Alternatives Policy (SNAP) reviews:
        • ODP & GWP
        • Flammability, toxicity
        • Contributions to smog
        • Aquatic and ecosystem effects
        • Occupational health and safety
      • 400+ substitutes reviewed for end uses in 8 sectors
    • 7.
      • United States: many refrigeration and air conditioning uses transitioned early
        • Moved from ODS to HFCs
        • Now moving to lower GWP solutions
      • Today SNAP’s evaluating substitutes offering significantly lower- or no-GWP choices
        • Comparing to current list substitutes
      Expanding SNAP Menu 4
    • 8. Information on Alternatives
    • 9. Taking Action for Sound ODS Phaseout
      • HFC Growth is direct result of ODS phaseout
      • Montreal Protocol experience and success on HFC-sectors
        • Refrigeration
        • Air Conditioning
        • Foams
        • Aerosols
        • Solvents
        • Fire Suppression
      • Montreal Protocol involved in addressing HFCs
        • Phaseout of HCFCs currently being implemented
        • Multilateral Fund incentivizes transition to climate-friendly alternatives
        • Many HPMPs approved at recent ExCom Meetings, more coming in 2011
    • 10. Indo-U.S. Workshop on HFCs
      • February 18, 2011 in New Delhi
      • More than 100 participants from Government and Industry in India, the United States, and Europe
      • Covered key sectors for HFC use and transition from HCFCs
        • Alternatives for refrigeration, air conditioning, foams and MDIs
        • Production Sector
    • 11. Workshop Conclusion
      • Excellent dialog and exchange of views
      • Recognition that more discussion is needed
      • Agreed to launch Task Force to report by August 1
        • Comprehensive Report covering all sectors and international framework
        • Members includes Government, Industry, and Experts
      • Intention to hold regional meeting later in 2011 with other countries participating
    • 12. North American HFC Proposal
      • Control HFC production and consumption
      • Control by-product emissions of HFC-23
      • Covers 20 HFCs, including 2 HFOs
      • Phase down , not Phase out of HFCs
        • Considering recent years HCFC and/or HFC consumption (allows some growth)
        • Alternatives available or in pipeline in most but not all sectors
        • Plateau 15% of Baseline, GWP-weighted
      • Ways to Achieve Phasedown
        • Transition out of HFCs
        • Smaller Charge Sizes
        • Move from High to Low GWP HFCs
        • Leak Control
    • 13. Trilateral Proposal Phasedown Schedule
    • 14. 2011 Trilateral Amendment Proposal
      • HFC-23 Byproduct Control
        • Significant HFC-23 emissions uncontrolled
        • By-product emissions subject to control
          • Obligation eligible for Multilateral Fund assistance
        • Additional benefits of 11,600 MMTCO2eq by 2050
      • Technical and Financial Support – MLF
        • Incremental cost model – has worked in these sectors
        • Bigger problem if we wait
      • Complements but leaves unchanged UNFCCC obligations
        • Supports global efforts to reduce GHGs
        • Leave HFCs in UNFCCC basket – accounting and reporting
    • 15. Substantial Climate Benefits Possible
      • Trilateral Proposal global cumulative benefits:
        • ~2,700 MtCO 2 eq* through 2020
          • Developed country Parties = 2,700 MMTCO 2 eq
          • Developing country Parties = 14 MMTCO 2 eq
        • ~87,000 MtCO 2 eq through 2050
          • Developed country Parties = 42,600 MMTCO 2 eq
          • Developing country Parties = 44,500 MMTCO 2 eq
        • HFC-23 byproduct control through 2050 – 11,600 MMTCO 2 eq
    • 16. consumption reductions emission reductions emissions North American Proposal Benefits MMTCO 2 eq
    • 17.
        • QUESTIONS?

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