The new EU Regulation on Ozone Depleting Substances implementing the Montreal Protocol

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The new EU Regulation on Ozone Depleting Substances implementing the Montreal Protocol by Etienne Gonin.

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The new EU Regulation on Ozone Depleting Substances implementing the Montreal Protocol

  1. 1. The New EU Regulation on Ozone Depleting Substances implementing the Montreal Protocol Ozone Team – DG Climate Action European Commission
  2. 2. Regulation (EC) 1005/2009 on substances that deplete the ozone layer Reviewed and simplified Regulation (EC) 2037/2000 Directly applicable in all EU Member States as of 01/01/2010 Implementation of the Montreal Protocol (as adjusted in 2007) but more ambitious Covers with the same approach all controlled substances Addresses future challenges to ensure the timely recovery of the ozone layer (incl. illegal trade, ODS banked in products and equipment) Controls all uses: even, to a certain extent, those not controlled under or exempted by the Montreal Protocol (e.g. feedstock and QPS)
  3. 3. The Global Context 1.800.000 Global ODS 1.600.000 1.400.000 1.200.000 1.000.000 800.000 600.000 400.000 200.000 0 Baseline 1990 1992 1994 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 A5 A2 EC
  4. 4. The EU Context EU ODS 700.000 600.000 500.000 400.000 300.000 200.000 100.000 0 Baseline 1990 2000 2005 -100.000 CFCs Halons Other Fully Halogenated CFCs Carbon Tetrachloride Methyl Chloroform HCFCs HBFCs Bromochloromethane Methyl Bromide
  5. 5. Main measures applicable (1) Production ban, except HCFCs subject to tight limits and for exempted uses Placing on the market only for exempted uses, subject to yearly determined quantitative limits (e.g. feedstock, lab uses, critical uses) and: use bans, including for HCFCs
  6. 6. Main measures applicable (2) Placing on the market bans for products and equipment containing ODS Licensing required for imports and exports Obligation to recover, emission reduction (e.g. qualified personnel only, leakage controls) Reporting obligations
  7. 7. Controlled Substances - HCFCs Production until 2020 only (in line with Decision XIX/6) Phase down steps (% of the 1997 baseline): 2010: 35% 2014: 14% 2017: 7%
  8. 8. HCFCs Production until 2020 (Decision XIX/6) but no ‘servicing end tail’ and additional reductions - for export only Placing on the market until 2015 For maintenance/servicing of existing RAC, but reclaimed HCFCs only, recycled HCFCs may be used in own installations or by the servicing company Labelling of containers and equipment Case-by-case exemption not beyond 2019 Substances and products/equipment
  9. 9. Products and Equipment (P&E) Inclusion of products and equipment relying on ODS to close loopholes Generalised placing on the market ban Applicable also to P&E manufactured before entering into force of the respective use bans Exemption for P&E serving exempted uses Case-by-case exemption for P&E containing HCFC, but not beyond 2019
  10. 10. Trade Leading principles Broader definition of “import” to cover movements under all custom procedures, including transit Trade in ODS and products and equipment only as far as the use is authorised in the EU Conditions for import and export are congruent (except exports of virgin HCFCs until 2020, imports banned)
  11. 11. Trade – Import General import ban for ODS and P&E containing or relying on ODS, exemptions only for ODS for essential laboratory and analytical uses ODS for feedstock or processing agents ODS for destruction Methyl Bromide for emergency uses and halons for critical uses P&E for essential analytical and laboratory uses P&E containing or relying on halons for critical uses P&E containing or relying on HCFC (if authorised on case-by-case basis)
  12. 12. Trade - Export General export ban for ODS and P&E containing or relying on ODS, exemptions for ODS for essential laboratory and analytical uses referred to in Art. 10 Halons for critical uses listed in Annex VI ODS for feedstock or process agent uses P&E for essential analytical and laboratory uses P&E containing or relying on halon for critical uses P&E containing or relying on HCFC (if authorised on case- by-case basis)
  13. 13. Trade - Licensing Applicable to all entries/exits under all customs procedures, except temporary storage and transit Applicable to products and equipment Legal basis to refuse licences under the iPIC system
  14. 14. Emissions & Banks Mandatory recovery of controlled substances from RAC and heat pump equipment maintained (baseline) Admissible destruction technologies listed in Annex VII Other products and equipment: Recovery of ODS mandatory if technically and economically feasible => legal basis to establish a list of such products
  15. 15. Phase out of Ozone Depleting Substances: Remaining Challenges & Uncertainties Manage the accelerated phase-out of HCFCs Default substitutes are (high GWP) HFCs Emissions of HFCs to be avoided Low GWP solutions need to be promoted Avoid emissions of ODS “banked” in products and equipment incl. stocks of “unwanted” ODS
  16. 16. Ozone Depleting Potential (ODP) and Global Warming Potential (GWP) ODP M GWP KP P (4AR) Chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) 0.6 – 1.0 Y 4,750 – 14,420 N Halons 3 -10 Y 404 – 7,140 N Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) 1.1 Y 1,400 N Methyl chloroform (CHCl3) 0.1 Y 146 N Methyl bromide (CH3Br) 0.6 Y 5 N Hydrochlorofluorocarbons 0.01 – 0.5 Y 77 – 2,310 N (HCFCs) Hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) -- N 77 – 14,800 Y
  17. 17. More information on http://ec.europa.eu/environment/ozone/

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