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Cataloguing and classification

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provides bibliographic description of books

provides bibliographic description of books

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  • These are also called the 8 elements of descriptive cataloguing
  • The first paragraph of the catalogue entry runs from the title and statement through the edition and stops at the imprint.
  • This should start on a new paragraph
  • This should start on a new paragraph
  • This should start on a new paragraph
  • Starts from another paragraph.
  • After the heading, it should be noted that the title starts from the forth letter of the heading. In the title of responsibility area Akinbo, O is written as O. Akinbo.
  • These are used to standardize the subject for uniformity. The subject arrived at is looked up in these lists to determine if it can be used or not. The subject heading gives suggestion and usually the subject in bold print is the one that can be used.
  • It should be noted that had it been the book was written by two authors and the second author is O. Oyewole, then the added entries will be I.title II. Oyewole, O (jt auth) III. Series.The authors may be more than two. If they are three, then all their names will reflect in the statement of responsibility but only two are included in the added entry, the second and third authors.
  • The cards should be made in the order of tracing- subjects, title, joint author and series. So the first added entry card made is for subject. The added entry is written on the forth alphabet of the main entry and all the other entries are repeated as in the main card.
  • It should be noted that Akinbo is used as main access point because he is the first author mentioned, while Oyewole is acknowledged in the statement of responsibility and the added entry
  • Transcript

    • 1. Oyewole olawale 2014 oyewolebaba01@yahoo.com
    • 2. Cataloguing in simple terms is the description of information resources, bringing out the important features and linking the users with the resources. TYPES OF CATALOGUING  DESCRIPTIVE CATALOGUING  SUBJECT CATALOGUING  CLASSIFIICATION
    • 3. This is the process of describing information resources by bringing out the essential bibliographic elements as outlined by the Anglo American Cataloguing Rules 2 (AACR2).
    • 4.         Heading/entry/access point Title and statement of responsibility Edition Imprint Collation Series statement Notes area ISBN
    • 5. The heading could be: 1. Author’s name (main author/joint author) 2. Title 3. Subject 4. Series title
    • 6.   The title is the exact title as it is on the book. At times titles include subtitle. Statement of responsibility refers to the individual or individuals who is/are responsible for the intellectual content of the book.
    • 7. This refers to the edition statement as seen from the book. Edition statement is written as 2nd ed. 3rd ed. 4th ed. And so on. Note however that there is nothing like 1st edition
    • 8. Imprint includes: I. Place of publication- the exact place and not country (Ibadan and not Nigeria). Except for United States where the name of both place and city is given II. Publishers name- the publishers name only, with PLC, and son etc III. Date of publication-year only
    • 9. This can also be called physical description area. The content here includes :  Number of preliminary pages in Roman figures  Number of Arabic pages  If the book is illustrated  The dimension of the book in centimeters.
    • 10. Not all books belong to series. Series are publications produced by the same publisher but for different intended users. If a book is in series it would be written on the book. The series statement is written immediately after the collation inside bracket.
    • 11. This is an area meant for all types of information that can not be fixed with the elements of description. In books however, this area takes care of Index and Bibliography. So if the book contains the two, they are recorded.
    • 12. This is a unique number that is issued to the book usually by the National Library. Every standard book should have one, it is an identifier that stamps approval on the book and also on the author of the book. This is the last element included when conducting descriptive cataloguing
    • 13.   Title and statement of responsibility area (:) used to separate the title from sub title. diagonal slash (/) used the separate statement of responsibility and the title of the book. imprint area- (:) separates the place of publication from the publisher (,) is used to separate the publisher from the date of publication.
    • 14. Collation area: , separate the preliminary pages from text pages : separate full text pages from illustrative material ; separates the illustrative material from the dimension Series area. ( ) series title is enclosed in brackets.
    • 15. Akinbo, O How to excel in examinations: a step by step approach/ O. Akinbo.- 2nd ed. Ibadan: University Press, 2014. ix, 240p. : illus; 23cm (examination series) It includes: Index Bibliography ISBN: 978-978-665-876-9
    • 16. Once descriptive cataloguing ends the next step is subject cataloguing. This has to do with the process of determining the subject of a book by examining all to relevant pages, in order to arrive at a subject which will be standardized and controlled by a subject heading lists.
    • 17. 1. 2. 3. Library of Congress Subject Heading Lists (LSCH) Sears Lists of Subject Headings (SLSH) Thesaurus
    • 18. Check through these parts of the book Title page Table of contents Preface, introduction, the text, publishers blurb, index bibliography If no subject clue from all these parts, consult an expert. Once the subject is known- Standardize using subject heading lists (LCSH/SLSH)
    • 19. Akinbo, O How to excel in examinations: a step by step approach/ O. Akinbo.- 2nd ed. Ibadan: University Press, 2014. ix, 240p. : illus; 23cm (examination series) It includes: Index Bibliography ISBN: 978-978-665-876-9 1. Education-examinations This is gotten from the subject heading after the cataloguer has gone through the relevant parts of the book and arrives at a subject, which is then controlled by the subject heading.
    • 20. In the layout of a catalogue entry, just after the subject is the space for added entries. What are added entries? They are fields or terms that are used to locate a particular book apart from the main entry. The author’s name is the main entry but at times, a book may be written by more than one author and two authors cannot be used as heading. So the other author (s) names are entered as added entries.
    • 21. Other added entries apart from joint author (s) are; title and series. They are usually preceded with Roman figure rendering: Example: I. title II. Joint author III. series
    • 22. Identify the main and added entries in the following titles: 1. Football in Nigeria by O. Ojo and P. Apan. 2. History of the world by P. Obi 3. Librarianship in Africa by U. Uzo, R. Oni and R. Audu 4. Information for development by R. Bada. The book is a part of the information series
    • 23. 1. 2. 3. 4. Main entry-Ojo. O. Added entries-Apan. P and title Main entry-Obi. P. Added entry- title Main entry-Uzo. U. Added entries- Oni. R and Audu. R and title Main entry-Bada. R. Added entries – title and series
    • 24.  THIS SYMBOLIZES THAT APART FROM THE MAIN CARD, ADDITIONAL CARDS WILL BE MADE WHERE THE ADDED ENTRIES WILL BE MADE THE ACCESS OR ENTRY POINT JUST LIKE THE MAIN ACCESS POINT IN THE FIRST CARDS.
    • 25. Akinbo, O How to excel in examinations: a step by step approach/ O. Akinbo.- 2nd ed. Ibadan: University Press, 2014. ix, 240p. : illus; 23cm (examination series) It includes: Index Bibliography ISBN: 978-978-665-876-9 1. Education-examinations I. title II. Series
    • 26. The combination of the subject and the added entries is called tracing. This means that the book can still be traced by the subject, title, name of joint author (s) and the series.
    • 27. Akinbo, O How to excel in examinations: a step by step approach/ O. Akinbo.- 2nd ed. Ibadan University Press, 2014. ix, 240p. : illus; 23cm (examination series) It includes: Index Bibliography ISBN: 978-978-665-876-9 1. Education-examinations I. title II. Series
    • 28. Education-examinations Akinbo, O How to excel in examinations: a step by step approach/ O. Akinbo.- 2nd ed. Ibadan: University Press, 2014. ix, 240p. : illus; 23cm (examination series) It includes: Index Bibliography ISBN: 978-978-665-876-9 1. Education-examinations I. title II. Series
    • 29. How to excel in examinations: a step by step approach Akinbo, O How to excel in examinations: a step by step approach/ O. Akinbo.- 2nd ed. Ibadan: University Press, 2014. ix, 240p. : illus; 23cm (examination series) It includes: Index Bibliography ISBN: 978-978-665-876-9 1. Education-examinations I. title II. Series
    • 30. Examination series Akinbo, O How to excel in examinations: a step by step approach/ O. Akinbo.- 2nd ed. Ibadan: University Press, 2014. ix, 240p. : illus; 23cm (examination series) It includes: Index Bibliography ISBN: 978-978-665-876-9 1. Education-examinations I. title II. Series
    • 31. Akinbo, O How to excel in examinations: a step by step approach/ O. Akinbo and O. Oyewole.- 2nd ed. Ibadan: University Press, 2014. ix, 240p. : illus; 23cm (examination series) It includes: Index Bibliography ISBN: 978-978-665-876-9 1. Education-examinations I. title II. Oyewole. O (jt auth) III. series
    • 32. The first added entry will be made for the subject, title, Oyewole and lastly for series. So the card for Oyewole. O will be made before that of the series.
    • 33. Oyewole. O Akinbo, O How to excel in examinations: a step by step approach/ O. Akinbo and O. Oyewole.- 2nd ed. Ibadan: University Press, 2014 ix, 240p. : illus; 23cm (examination series) It includes: Index Bibliography ISBN: 978-978-665-876-9 1. Education-examinations I. title II. Oyewole. O (jt auth) III. series
    • 34. As in the example used, the added entries are: 1. Subject 2. Title 3. Joint Author 4. Series
    • 35. A DISCUSSION OF CATALOGUING WITHOUT CLASSIFICATION WILL NOT BE COMPLETE. CLASSIFICATION ADDS MEANING TO CATALOGUING, IT MAKES THE WHOLE PROCESS USEFUL EVENTUALLY TO THE USERS. THIS PRESENTATION WILL TAKE A BIRD’SEYE VIEW OF CLASSIFICATION OF BOOKS
    • 36. Classification is as important as cataloguing, the two processes go hand in hand. Cataloguing without classification is a waste, classification adds usefulness to the catalogue. Classification in librarianship simply means grouping of information materials according to subjects for easy retrieval of information. classification deals with parking and marking of information materials.
    • 37. Parking has to do with bringing books on related subjects together. As such physics will be close to chemistry, while government will be close to political science. The subject relationship is the hallmark, this helps users to have access to books who share subject relationship. It would not be in the interest of the users if for example books on religion and social sciences are shelved together, what relationship do they have in the area of subject mutuality?
    • 38. This has to do with giving an appropriate notation so that the books that have been catalogued can be logically arranged and easily retrieved by the users. The marking process allocates the class number for the book, it is this number that gives the right location and address of the book on the shelve. With this, even if the library is as big as two standard football fields, the needed book can be retrieved within a short time with the class number which the marking aspect of classification provides.
    • 39. Classification schemes facilitate the process of classification. Classification schemes are arrangement and outline of main classes of subject, including their divisions and sub divisions in a systematic order with their assigned class number.
    • 40.      Dewey Decimal Classification Scheme (DDC) Library of Congress Classification Scheme (LC) Universal Decimal Classification Scheme (UDC) Colon Classification Scheme (CC) BLISS Classification Scheme AND THE LIKES. THE EMPHASIS HERE IS ON DDC.
    • 41.   Developed in 1876 by Melvil Dewey Groups knowledge into 10 main classes 000-999 Generalities 100-199 Philosophy and Psychology 200-299 Religion 300-399 Social Sciences 400-499 Languages 500-599 Sciences 600-699 Technology
    • 42.   700-799 Arts 800-899 Literature 900-999 History Produced in four volumes Volume 1 Tables and Manual Volume 2&3 Schedules Volume 4 Relative Index DDC uses pure notation
    • 43. Classification should not be done from the index. The index presents a list of all the main subjects and main aspects of subject with their appropriate classification number, the classification number for further subject division cannot be retrieved from the index. For example , if a book has the title- Agriculture in Nigeria. The main subject no doubt is Agriculture, the classification number for that which is 630 can be gotten from the index of DDC
    • 44. But a book with the title – Agricultural Practices in Nigeria will need more than an index to get the appropriate classification number. This is because the classification number for Agricultural Practices is not in the index, the schedule (Vol 3 of DDC) needs to be consulted for that. The index can only lead the classifier to the classification number of the broad subject which is Agriculture, and if the schedule is consulted under 630, more aspects of Agriculture will be outlined with their class numbers and practices will definitely be there. Hypothetical it could be 634.
    • 45. But that is not all, this is because the title of the book is Agricultural practices in Nigeria. The classification number for Nigeria must also be provided, where can that be found-the index? Nothe schedule? No- the table? Exactly the table. The table is also consulted for sub division of all sorts. Presently the DDC has reduced the number of tables to 6 from 7. The table that contains the number for Nigeria is table 2, which is 669. so 669 is added to the hypothetical class number for Agricultural Practices which is 634 to make the complete classification number of 634.669.
    • 46. The example given illustrates the process of classification: 630 634 634.669 INDEX SCHEDULES TABLES CLASSIFICATION STARTS FROM THE INDEX TO THE SCHEDULES AND IF NEDDED THE TABLES
    • 47. These two terms are different. Classification number is the number gotten from the classification scheme through the index, schedules and tables, while call number is the classification number plus (in the case of DDC) the first three letters of the author’s surname. For instance if the author of the book Agricultural Practices in Nigeria is Akinbo Olaide, then the classification number is 634.669 while the call number will be (AKI 634.669).
    • 48. Once the classification number has been retrieved and the author’s name added, it must be placed in the right place on the catalogue card for users to make use of it in locating the book in the library. The next example shows how a complete card looks like.
    • 49. AKI 634.669 Akinbo. O Agricultural practices in Nigeria/ O. Akinbo.- 2nd ed. Ibadan: Macmillan, 2014. ix, 120p. : illus; 23cm (Agriculture series) It includes: Index ISBN 978978546436 1. Agriculture I. Title II. Series