Avoiding Plagiarism
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Avoiding Plagiarism

on

  • 618 views

This presentation was given during New Student Orientation 2012.

This presentation was given during New Student Orientation 2012.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
618
Views on SlideShare
618
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
8
Comments
0

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Fix title and design
  • Each PAL group, discuss briefly – what is the definition. We will ask a group to report and then see if anyone else has something to add on.
  • Need to find some graphicsWhose?Anything that has been published, submitted, or communicated to you before Except Common Knowledge:- Dates, facts, sayings- Information widely available in multiple sourcesBy you, by a scholar, by your professor, by your classmate, by your Mom…How?Direct QuoteParaphraseIndirect Citation
  • Graphic with someone asking question/frustrated student with head on desk/confusedHow?Direct QuoteParaphrase
  • Paraphrase can be tricky—work through examples with your groups
  • Things to note: a paraphrase is a distillation—should be shorter!
  • Why is citation important?What are the common elements of most citation styles?Check citing styles of above article

Avoiding Plagiarism Avoiding Plagiarism Presentation Transcript

  • Avoiding Plagiarism
  • Whose? Anything that has been published, submitted, or communicated to you before Except Common Knowledge: - Dates, facts, sayings - Information widely available in multiple sources Images via flickr users meneldur, star5112, and A.J.85
  • Direct Quote ParaphraseImage from ClipArtPalhttp://www.clipartpal.com/clipart/school/schoolchair_287364.html
  • In her article about using humor in library instruction, Billie Walker (2006) notes, “One of the challenges facing the teaching librarian is in reaching students, particularly when they are tired and unmotivated” (p. 123).Walker, B.E. (2006). Using humor in library instruction. Reference Services Review, 34(1), 117-128. doi: 1023512501.
  • Image from ClipArtPalhttp://www.clipartpal.com/clipart/school/schoolchair_287364.html
  • Original Source:“The stirrings Games is about the first Hunger of revolutionary consciousness, but its relationship to capitalism is less clear than it might initially appear. Does the Capitol double for capital, or is the form of exploitation in The Hunger Games of a cruder type? Although the Capitol looks at first sight like a metropolitan capitalist society, the mode of power at work in Panem is better described as cyber-feudal. "Fisher, Mark. "Precarious Dystopias: The Hunger Games, In Time, and Never Let Me Go." Film Quarterly 65.4 (2012): 27-33. Web.
  • Example 1: The Hunger Games is about the beginnings of revolutionary awareness, but its relationship to capitalism is more unclear than it might originally seem. Does the Capitol also mean capital, or is the form of profiteering in The Hunger Games of a more primitive kind? Although the Capitol looks like an urban capitalist world, the type of control in Panem is cyber-feudal.Paraphrase or plagiarism?
  • Example 2: Although it depicts a society on the verge of revolution, whether The Hunger Games’ society is a capitalist society is debatable. Closer examination of the society reveals a “cyber-feudal” power structure (Fisher 28).Paraphrase or plagiarism?
  • Original Source: “ Yet, while Batman and the Joker may not be god or demon, strictly speaking, the comics and films consistently represent the characters in ways charged with divine and demonic symbolism. Moreover, these portrayals are often strikingly reminiscent of the storm god and dragon of the ancient combat myth. A prime example of this portrayal, found in the earliest comics to the recent films, is the iconic image of Batman perched high atop a skyscraper, surveying the city for evildoers to punish. "Nichols, Michael. "“I Think You and I Are Destined to Do This Forever”: A Reading of the Batman/Joker Comic and Film Tradition through the Combat Myth." Journal of Religion and Popular Culture 23.2 (2011): 236-50. Web.
  • Example 1: Yet, while Batman and the Joker may not be god or demon, strictly speaking, the comics and films consistently represent the characters in ways charged with divine and demonic symbolism. Moreover, these portrayals are often strikingly reminiscent of the storm god and dragon of the ancient combat myth. A prime example of this portrayal, found in the earliest comics to the recent films, is the iconic image of Batman perched high atop a skyscraper, surveying the city for evildoers to punish.Paraphrase or plagiarism?
  • Example 2: The depictions of Batman and the Joker in both the films and graphic novels have many parallels to the storm god and dragon found in religious narratives (Nichols 239).Paraphrase or plagiarism?
  • Lewis, K. (2012). What if The Hunger Games were real? Scholastic Scope, 60(13), 17-19. Retrieved August 21, 2012, from Academic Search Complete.Lewis, Kristin. "What If The Hunger Games Were Real?" Scholastic Scope 60.13 (2012): 17-19. Academic Search Complete. Web. 21 Aug. 2012.