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Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program - Global Cities Initiative Export Roundtable - Atlanta, GA
 

Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program - Global Cities Initiative Export Roundtable - Atlanta, GA

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Presentation by Amy Liu, Co-Director of the Metropolitan Policy Program. ...

Presentation by Amy Liu, Co-Director of the Metropolitan Policy Program.

Global Cities Initiative export roundtable in Atlanta, GA on March 19, 2013.

The Global Cities Initiative is a Joint Project of Brookings and JPMorgan Chase.

For more information: http://www.brookings.edu/projects/global-cities.aspx

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    Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program - Global Cities Initiative Export Roundtable - Atlanta, GA Brookings Metropolitan Policy Program - Global Cities Initiative Export Roundtable - Atlanta, GA Presentation Transcript

    • Going Global: Opportunities for the Atlanta RegionMetropolitan Policy Program GCI Export Roundtable - Atlanta, GA / March 19, 2013at BROOKINGS 1
    • The U.S. Economy Has Grown Very Few Jobs in the Sector That Drives Prosperity = Tradable Local Jobs Sector JobSource: Ezell, Stephen and Robert Atkinson, 2012, “Fifty Ways to Leaver YourCompetitiveness Woes Behind,” ITIF. 2
    • The U.S. Economy Has Grown Very Few Jobs in the Sector That Drives Prosperity 2% = incremental job growth in the U.S. between 1990-2008 from tradable sectors Tradable Local Jobs Sector JobSource: Ezell, Stephen and Robert Atkinson, 2012, “Fifty Ways to Leaver Your Source: Michael Spence, “The Evolving Structure of the American Economy and theCompetitiveness Woes Behind,” ITIF. Employment Challenge,” Council on Foreign Relations, 2011. 2
    • The New Reality: Growth Markets Are Increasingly Located Outside of the U.S. Global GDP 29% BIC Countries 18.3% US 2016Source: International Monetary Fund, World Economic Outlook Database, April 2010; UN Department ofEconomic-Social Affairs, World Urbanization Prospects, 2009 3
    • The New Reality: Growth Markets Are Increasingly Located Outside of the U.S. Global GDP 29% $ 21 trillion BIC Countries global middle class consumption in 2000 18.3% US 2016Source: International Monetary Fund, World Economic Outlook Database, April 2010; UN Department ofEconomic-Social Affairs, World Urbanization Prospects, 2009 3
    • The New Reality: Growth Markets Are Increasingly Located Outside of the U.S. Global GDP 29% $ 31 trillion BIC Countries global middle class consumption in 2020 18.3% US 2016Source: International Monetary Fund, World Economic Outlook Database, April 2010; UN Department ofEconomic-Social Affairs, World Urbanization Prospects, 2009 3
    • The New Reality: Growth Markets Are Increasingly Located Outside of the U.S. 1. Macau, Macau 11. Jakarta, Indonesia 2. Perth, Australia 12. Zhongshan, China 3. Riyadh, Saudi Arabia 13. Delhi, India 4. Xiamen, China 14. Jeddah-Mecca, Saudi Arabia Top 20 Global Metros, Economic 5. Changsha, China 15. Shenzhen, China Performance 6. Fuzhou, China 16. Ningbo, China (2011-2012) 7. San Juan, Puerto Rico 17. Zhuhai, China 8. Hangzhou, China 18. Wulumuqi, China 9. Wuhan, China 19. Kunming, China 10. Hefei, China 20. Dongying, ChinaSource: Istrate, Emilia and Carey Anne Nadeau, 2012, “Global MetroMonitor 2012,” Brookings. 4
    • 1 2 3 Exports will be a key driver 1 of the next economy 5
    • Leaders Will Harness the Potential of Global Trade Global Exports Value Exports Share of U.S. GDP Growth (2009-2011, trillions) (2010-2011) $17.8 $14.9 $12.4 46% 2009 2010 2011Source: International Monetary Fund, Direction of Trade Statistics (December 2012), Emilia Istrate and Nick Marchio, “Export Nation 2012,” Brookings, 2012. 6
    • The U.S. Has a $194 Billion Trade Surplus in Services U.S. Balance of Trade by Services Sector, 2011 (billions) Financial Software Licenses Travel Other Business Industrial Licenses Education Management Consulting Passenger Fares Telecommunications Research & Development Computing Freight & Port Use Insurance -$40 -$30 -$20 -$10 $0 $10 $20 $30 $40 $50 $60Source: Economics and Statistics Administration, 2011, “U.S. Trade in Private Services,” Washington, DC 7
    • Going Global Pays Off for Small and Medium Enterprises U.S. Manufacturing Firms Revenue Growth (2005-2009) 37% -7% Exporting Non- ExportingSource: U.S. International Trade Commission, 2010, “Small and Medium-Sized Enterprises: Characteristics and Performance,” Washington, 8
    • The U.S. Is an Under-Exporter Exports Share of GDP 30% 29% 22% 2011 13% China Canada India 15% 15% Japan European Union United StatesSource: Brookings analysis of WTO and EIU data, 2011 9
    • The U.S. Is an Under-Exporter 1% of all U.S. firms export 42% of surveyed middle-market U.S. firms operate entirely within the U.S. Source: Economist Intelligence Unit, “U.S. Middle Market Firms and the Global Marketplace: Should ISource: International Trade Administration Stay or Should I Go,” 2013. 10
    • The U.S. Is an Under-Exporter 1% of all U.S. firms export 4%of surveyed middle-market U.S. firms are currently expanding overseas Source: Economist Intelligence Unit, “U.S. Middle Market Firms and the Global Marketplace: Should ISource: International Trade Administration Stay or Should I Go,” 2013. 10
    • The U.S. Is an Under-Exporter• Companies fear exporting• Companies lack awareness of global opportunities and services• Inadequate pipeline of export ready companies• Export services vary in quality and are often fragmented• State and federal efforts often lack sustained vision and commitment 11
    • 1 2 3 The Atlanta region must act 2 on the export moment to prosper in the next economy 12
    • The Atlanta Region Is a Major Exporter, But Lags In Intensity and Growth Export Volume (billions, 2010) $20.0 (13th) Export Intensity (2010) 8.0% (77th) Export Growth (2003-2008) 6.7% (60th) Export Growth (2009-2010) 10.8% (49th)Sources: Emilia Istrate and Nick Marchio, “Export Nation 2012,” Brookings 13
    • The Atlanta Region Is a Major Exporter, But Lags In Intensity and Growth Export Volume (billions, 2010) $20.0 Services Share (13th) 53% of Exports (2010) Export Intensity (2010) 8.0% (77th) Export Growth (2003-2008) 6.7% Services Share (60th) 67% of Export Growth (2003-2010) Export Growth (2009-2010) 10.8% (49th)Sources: Emilia Istrate and Nick Marchio, “Export Nation 2012,” Brookings 13
    • Metro Areas Hold the Bulk of the Assets That Will Drive Exports Top 100 Metros Share of U.S. Totals 78% 82% 74% 75% 75% 66% 65% Population Goods College Services GDP Patents Air Freight Exports Degrees ExportsSource: Brookings analysis of US Census Bureau, BLS, BEA, NIH and NSF data 14
    • Metro Areas Play a Unique Role In Boosting Exports Open new markets through free trade agreements Finance exports through Ex-Im and SBA Federal 3 on-the-ground expertise in foreign markets Provide Produce export data to inform state and regional efforts 15
    • Metro Areas Play a Unique Role In Boosting Exports Open new markets through free trade agreements Finance exports through Ex-Im and SBA Federal Provide on-the-ground expertise in foreign markets Produce export data to inform state and regional efforts Organize and facilitate trade missions State 3 Support and coordinate metro-level efforts Prioritize exports in state economic strategy 15
    • Metro Areas Play a Unique Role In Boosting Exports Open new markets through free trade agreements Finance exports through Ex-Im and SBA Federal Provide on-the-ground expertise in foreign markets Produce export data to inform state and regional efforts Organize and facilitate trade missions State Support and coordinate metro-level efforts Prioritize exports in state economic strategy Increase the number of export-ready firms through direct relationships Metro 3 Coordinate federal, state, and local programs Catalyze cultural shift by mainstreaming exports and trade 15
    • 1 2 3 The Atlanta region can launch 3 an export plan to reposition the region for global success 16
    • Join the Metropolitan Export Initiative Metropolitan Export Initiative Data: Export Nation 2010 & 2012 In Depth: Four pilot metros Portland, Los Angeles, Minneapolis-St. Paul, Syracuse Scale Up: Metropolitan Export Exchange Charleston, Chicago, Columbus, Des Moines, Louisville/Lexington, San Antonio, San Diego, Tampa Bay Resources: brookings.edu/metro/mei 17
    • Metropolitan Export Planning Goal: Double exports in the next five years Target industries: computers and electronics, clean technology & innovationPortland Strategies: 1. Leverage primary exporters in computer and electronics 2. Catalyze under-exporters in manufacturing 3. Improve the export pipeline for small business 4. “We Build Green Cities” - brand and market Greater Portlandʼs global edge 18
    • Metropolitan Export Planning Goal: Double exports in the next five years Target industries: computers and electronics, clean technology & innovationPortland City of Portland Mayor’s Office 18
    • Metropolitan Export PlanningPortland Export Plan Co-Chairs 19
    • The 10 Steps Guide and MEI Website Help Metros Deliver Export Plans 20
    • 1. Go Metro to Go Global 6. Develop a Customized Export Plan2. Organize for Success 7. Prepare for Implementation3. Produce a Data-Driven Market Scan 8. Identify and Promote Policy Priorities4. Capture Local Market Insight 9. Track and Publicize Progress 10. Mainstream Exports Into Economic5. Champion Exports Now Development 21
    • Go Metro to Go Global Developing the Export Plan1. Go Metro to Go Global 6. Develop a Customized Export Plan2. Organize for Success 7. Prepare for Implementation5. Champion Exports Now 8. Identify and Promote Policy Priorities 10. Mainstream Exports Into Economic DevelopmentMarket Assessment3. Produce a Data-Driven Market Scan Track and Publicize Progress4. Capture Local Market Insight 9. Track and Publicize Progress 21
    • Metropolitan Export Planning Metropolitan Atlanta Export Plan Atlanta Build on Metropolitan Atlantaʼs Strengths Goals Strategies Target industries Network 22
    • Exports Should Be Part of a Larger Global Engagement Strategy Innovative U.S. Products & Services GLOBAL Freight & Infrastructure ENGAGEMENT Skills to Support Innovation Immigrant Talent/ Exports & FDI Cultural Fluency 23
    • Going Global: Opportunities for the Atlanta RegionMetropolitan Policy Program GCI Export Roundtable - Atlanta, GA / March 19, 2013at BROOKINGS 24