An Introduction to Social CRM & Social Business, Tom Schuster, SugarCRM

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The rapid adoption of social media has created a new paradigm for doing business: it's called Social Business. In this presentation, Tom Schuster will set out how to make your business a Social Business and how to supercharge your internal processes through the use of Social CRM - and your own imagination. He will explain how to engage with customers in meaningful ways, capture customer data, drive revenue and build brand reputation.

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  • The first three rules show that customers are quite sophisticated. They do not trust companies as much as they do the participants on the Web whether those people are peers, friends or customers of a certain product. In this way, customer service has become the new marketing. A happy customer, to use a military term, is a force multiplier – meaning they not only benefit the customer with their business but they also hold the potential to become the best marketing a company could ask for because of tools such as Facebook and Twitter. United made the mistake of not responding. Here’s another thought on importance of customer service.Max J. Pucher Takes Social CRM to the WoodshedIf you're sick of vendor hype about social CRM, or pretty much anything else, you're not alone: this week IT blogger Max J. Pucher tore into social media hype . Here are two particularly important excerpts:How can anyone think that I will be a happier customer because a flight attendant greets me by reading my name from a list after I spent an unacceptable time waiting at check in? [...]So will a social CRM strategy improve anything? No, because in most businesses there is not even empowerment of the employees that need to deal with the now socially empowered customers. There is not even a common customer record. Most businesses are still internally in CONTROL mode and they want to expand it by means of BPM. Now many want to expand BPM into the CRM customer interaction to assert more control over the relationship. Is that empowerment or is that in any way Social? I don't see it. The marketing department wants to expand its INFLUENCE mode by using predictive analysis to trick customers into spontaneous buying. Some even pretend to be social, much in line with lame Corporate Social Responsibility marketing.Pucher goes on to emphasize the need to empower customer service to provide real value to customers, citing his experience with the Apple Store as compared with a T-Mobile retail outlet:My iPhone4 was broken, but within the service contract they replaced it with a new one in 24 hours by courier. At the T-Mobile shop the replacement of a phone takes at least SIX WEEKS! The clerk says: 'Those are the rules.'I'm not quite sure he hits the mark though: how exactly is "empowering" that T-Mobile clerk going to change anything? T-Mobile needs to improve its ability to replace to replace phones, not the clerk's ability to bend the rules for one customer.And that's part of the problem with social CRM as a cure-all for business. I don't want a company to give me special treatment because I complain on Twitter and have a lot of followers. I want a company to get the customer experience part right in the first place.
  • Start with the customer. Then you’ll get it right without trying.
  • The answer is : YOU PUT THE CUSTOMER IN THE MIDDLEAn organisation can only achieve the responsiveness needed if it organises itself around its customers. The old approach was to optimise internal processes such as order processing etc. Thus the ERP system became the focal point and all activities radiated out from it. Therefor internal processes drove external communication. In the new, customer centric era this is unacceptable. By putting the customer at the center an organisation gets it right. A successful organisation empowers the people that are at the customer interface (Sales, support, call center, marketing, customer service departments) by pacing the information and tools at their fingertips to be able to react and decide correctly immediately. The next step is then to push this boundary out even further to include customers and partners. This we call the social revolution. A modern organisation needs to become open in order to successfully put the customer in the middle. Putting the customer in the middle requires a customer relationship management solution = crm.Sugar has been not only producing a crm system but actually putting into practice the concepts of an open organisation since its inception. I will try to impart some of the lessons we’ve learned, and the mistakes that we have made along the way today.70% of old CRM projects by legacy CRM vendors were unsuccessful. SugarCRM has a better than 85% success rate. Why is this?Because we make CRM simple. This is the key. If the CRM is easy to use and really helpful, then it will be successful.
  • CRM stands for <CLICK> Customer<CLICK> Relationship <CLICK> Management
  • So CRM is not about technology butall about Customers, YOUR Customers.
  • Let’s make sure we are all on the same page here around a common definition of CRM. Plain and simple, Customer Relationship Management (CRM) is about attracting and retaining customers. Of course, you do not need a CRM system but a properly implemented CRM system, married with the a good CRM strategy and trained employees allows companies to attract and retain customers at a much greater rate. CRM allows companies to grow.
  • An organisation can only achieve the responsiveness needed if it organises itself around its customers. The old approach was to optimise internal processes such as order processing etc. Thus the ERP system became the focal point and all activities radiated out from it. Therefor internal processes drove external communication. In the new, customer centric era this is unacceptable. By putting the customer at the center an organisation gets it right. A successful organisation empowers the people that are at the customer interface (Sales, support, call center, marketing, customer service departments) by pacing the information and tools at their fingertips to be able to react and decide correctly immediately
  • . The next step is then to push this boundary out even further to include customers and partners. This we call the social revolution. A modern organisation needs to become open in order to successfully put the customer in the middle. Putting the customer in the middle requires a customer relationship management solution = crm.How does one use Social tools to achieve this?
  • Quote: Mark Fidelman“Social CRM is simply taking traditional CRM and adding multichannel social technologies, social analytics and social engagement strategy to help Sales, Marketing and Customer Service be more productive.”
  • Let’s make sure we are all on the same page here around a common definition of CRM. Plain and simple, Customer Relationship Management (CRM) is about attracting and retaining customers. Of course, you do not need a CRM system but a properly implemented CRM system, married with the a good CRM strategy and trained employees allows companies to attract and retain customers at a much greater rate. CRM allows companies to grow.
  • To be successful a Social CRM must be based on an Open SystemThere are 3 elements to an Open CRM: it must be intuitive, flexible and open. I’d like to demonstrate to you SugarCRM puts this mantra of CRM made Simple into practice to truly make CRM simple.
  • Our software is published as open source. This means that you can read and change the code if you wish. But we are much more than just open source now. It forms the basis. We are an Open System. What Open Systems mean is a way of life, of working with customers and partners, of giving them control, and thereby ultimately gaining control. This is a Taoist thought (you know, Ying and Yang). Lao Tse, the founder of Daoism said: ‘Avoid putting yourself before others and you can become a leader of men’. What he was saying is that by giving others control, you gain control. We did this by giving everyone full access to our source code. It made us strong, the fastest growing CRM system in the world. The traditional approach is Vendor controlled. First generation CRM systems, like Siebel, and second generation, like Salesforce were written to give the vendor control over the customer and maximise their own revenue. An Open System gives the customer control, not the vendor. The result is a that the user is not dependent on the Vendor to make a change or fix a bug: he can have his partner do it if necessary (or do it himself. Not recommended!). An Open System also makes it very easy to integrate applications and modify the system. Because, let’s face it, CRM is a journey. It’s not a point application like ERP or a manufacturing system which is immensely painful to implement but once done then hardly changes. When you start on your CRM journey you don’t even know what’s going to hit you in the future? Will you buy another rcompany and roll them in? What applications will need to be integrated? Do your users want business analytics applied to the Sugar data? A document management system? To integrate some of the new, social apps? What will be dreamed up in the fture? Do you know? I don’t. So the system needs to be open to accommodate unknown changes and requirements in the future. Like I said over 80% of our customers are driven by user level, departmental decisions. It starts off with one bunch of users in say the call center or the support department saying: we need a tool to answer this customer requirement. For example Tollpost, a major package delivery company in the Nordics (sort of like UPS). Their call center wanted to improve things by giving customers web access. Their IT department has Siebel but to implement a services web portal in that was too low priority for the IT department and an awful amount of work and cost. So the users chose Sugar. Because they were successful within a couple of months the sales department said they wanted Sugar too. New apps needed integrating, the sales process customising, etc. They did this all themselves together with the Sugar partner Redpill. Did the support dept know that the sales dept would join in? No they didn’t. In fact it has nothing to do with them. The good thing was that they made a decision that didn’t preclude another decision being made in the future. That is what openness brings: the ability to make a good decision today that enables you to make good decisions in the future again and again, although you don’t know what those decision will be. This is an open decision. This is what Open Systems allow. A closed decision does the opposite. It basically rules out change in the future. A closed system is there for the benefit of the vendor, not to give you control.The next element of openness is the huge community that we have built up in the Sugar ecosystem. This has enabled us to very quickly develop a world class CRM system. In fact we are being chosen today because we’re the best solution. Beforehand it was the open source element that really drove adoption but due to the huge contribution of the community of partners, developers and customers (there are hundreds of free extensions on SugarForge, and for fee extensions on SugarExchange, but Sugar earns nothing when you get these apps) SugarCRM is not only highly functional but also really cost effective. We cost approx ¼ of sales force. And you don’t pay more over time, either: the costs don’t escalate the way that they do with Sales force. This is because we are an open company and because of the power of our community.
  • CRM systems are fairly extensive and many features only used infrequently. In order for users to automatically know how to use the system and want to use it, it must look and feel and act like the apps they use every day like Google, Facebook, etc. How many of you use these products and have needed to attend a training course? None, right? The same must apply to your CRM system. It should be intuitively usable. Obviously for the deeper features some training should be given, but a user, when confronted with a new feature he hasn’t used before should intuitively choose the right option. It should also make his life easier. We at Sugar have focussed on the ergonomics of using CRM: We asked ourselves the question: ‘how can we get this task done in the least possible number of steps?’ Because, let’s face it, the sales rep is making a micro decision each time: do I use the system in real time or just write it on a piece of paper and enter it later (or not!). So we reduced every step to as few clicks as possible. This is intuitive and making CRM simple.The same applies to administration. 80% of our customers have no IT involvement. The users decided and ran the project. In others, even with IT, the users administer their system. So it has to be really intuitive to administer, very easy to customise using studio builder or build mini apps using module builder. We pubilcise ‘upgrade safe’ rules so that the user customisations will automatically work when a new version is installed. This is very important because your users should continuously be enjoying the latest features and benefits without delay. We at Sugar eat our own dogfood here. We always are the first to use new versions and we in Munich get to taste it first! We’re 9 hours ahead of our Californian head office so they upgrade at 10 pm and 10 minutes later we walk into the office and use the live system.
  • A CRM solution gives all your customer facing organizations (marketing, sales and support) access to the same customer information and allows them to work together as a team to follow the process you have put in place to meet the business goals for your company.
  • Hillel is the largest organization in the world with a focus on university-age Jewish studentHillel serves young adults at more than 550 colleges and communities in North America, SouthAmerica, Israel, and the former Soviet Union. Hillel seeks to enrich the lives of Jewish undergraduate and graduate students so that they may enrich the Jewish people and the world
  • Hillel needed a CRM solution that would enable real-time tracking by staff and interns to evaluate the impact that peer engagement initiatives were having on a campus and across campuses.
  • System RequirementsFlexible enough to allow data migration from a highly customized legacy systemOptimized for different user levels, including hundreds of Hillel staff and student internsCross-browser compatibleMulti-lingual
  • The ResultSugar’s social and mobile capabilities have allowed Hillel to implement a mobile-friendly Social CRM systemIntegrated with popular media channels such as Facebook and Twitter.This encourages high user adoption among staff and interns. Users can enter new student data into REACH from any location, anytime.
  • Just state the points in this summary.Thank You
  • Note: this presentation was prepared for IBM. Repalce the logo with te partner logo that you are working with both here and at the various are places
  • An Introduction to Social CRM & Social Business, Tom Schuster, SugarCRM

    1. 1. Social Business and Social CRM Tom Schuster General Manager SugarCRM Europe, Middle East, Africa
    2. 2. Social Business GETTING STARTED • The business context • The essential characteristics • Getting started • A live example • Recommendation6/13/2012 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 2
    3. 3. 6/13/201 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 3
    4. 4. Change:Newspaper Circulation 6/13/201 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 4
    5. 5. Change: Egypt’s Facebook Revolution 6/13/201 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 5
    6. 6. Change: Occupy Wall Street Revolution 6/13/201 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 6
    7. 7. Change: Accelerated speed to going Critical 6/13/201 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 7
    8. 8. Change: Facebook rapid adoption 6/13/201 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 8
    9. 9. 6/13/201 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 9
    10. 10. Source: Brett Tischler, 2007 (http://gallery.photo.net/) 6/13/201 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 10
    11. 11. Evolution of the Sales Landscape 6/13/2012 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 11
    12. 12. Marketing: Complex Social Buying Model 6/13/2012 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 12
    13. 13. Customer Service is Marketing 6/13/2012 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 13
    14. 14. Start With the Customer 6/13/2012 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 14
    15. 15. Put the customer at the center CRM6/13/2012 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 15
    16. 16. CRM Customer Relationship Management6/13/2012 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 16
    17. 17. CRMCRM is about Customers6/13/2012 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 17
    18. 18. CRM is about Acquiring, Retaining and Growing Customers ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 18 ©2009 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 05/08/096/13/2012 18
    19. 19. Enable the sales edge INNER CORE SALES EDGE CUSTOMERS SALES CUSTOMER SERVICE CALL CENTER MARKETING 6/13/2012 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 19
    20. 20. Introducing Social CRM 6/13/2012 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 20
    21. 21. CRM Made Social: Enable the customer edge SALES EDGE CUSTOMERS SALES CUSTOMER SERVICE CALL CENTER MARKETING 6/13/2012 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 21
    22. 22. Social CRM Social CRM is an extension of, not a replacement for, CRM 6/13/2012 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 22
    23. 23. CRM made Simple6/13/2012 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 23 05/08/09
    24. 24. CRM Made Simple Social CRM Intuitive Open Flexible6/13/2012 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 24
    25. 25. 6 Steps to Getting started with Social CRMStep 1: Implement an Open CRM SystemStep 2: Customise the user interface and processesStep 3: Integrate the essential back end systemsStep 4: Implement a flexible infrastructureStep 5: Provide collaboration toolsStep 6: Use the Social Tools of choice 6/13/2012 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 25
    26. 26. Getting started with Social CRM Social CRMStep 1: Implement an Open CRM SystemStep 2: Customise the user interface and processesStep 3: Integrate the essential back end systemsStep 4: Implement a flexible infrastructureStep 5: Provide collaboration toolsStep 6: Use the Social Tools of choice6/13/2012 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 26
    27. 27. Social CRM Open Technology Open Systems Users Have Control Web applications Web Standards Reasonable, predictable cost Community6/13/2012 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 27
    28. 28. Getting started with Social CRM Social CRMStep 1: Implement an Open CRM SystemStep 2: Customise the user interface and processesStep 3: Integrate the essential back end systemsStep 4: Implement a flexible infrastructureStep 5: Provide collaboration toolsStep 6: Use the Social Tools of choice6/13/2012 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 28
    29. 29. Social CRMIntuitive For Users Web 2.0 User Experience Works the Way YOU Work For Administrators Simple Customisation Seamless Upgrades6/13/2012 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 29
    30. 30. Getting started with Social CRMStep 1: Implement an Open CRM SystemStep 2: Customise the user interface and processesStep 3: Integrate the essential back end systemsStep 4: Implement a flexible infrastructureStep 5: Provide collaboration toolsStep 6: Use the Social Tools of choice 6/13/2012 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 30
    31. 31. 360 Degree View of the CustomerCRM Activities INTERNAL data sources• Customer Support • ERP• Marketing • Market Data• Sales • HR • Product Specialised Tools External Data Sources • Web Analysis • Linked-In • Business Intelligence • InsideView • Statistics • Hoovers
    32. 32. Getting started with Social CRMStep 1: Implement an Open CRM SystemStep 2: Customise the user interface and processesStep 3: Integrate the essential back end systemsStep 4: Implement a flexible infrastructureStep 5: Provide collaboration toolsStep 6: Use the Social Tools of choice6/13/2012 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 32
    33. 33. Intuitive CLOUD 2.0 Run AnywhereRUN ANYWHERE• Any Device• Any Platform• Any Cloud On Site6/13/2012 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 33
    34. 34. Getting started with Social CRM Social CRMStep 1: Implement an Open CRM SystemStep 2: Customise the user interface and processesStep 3: Integrate the essential back end systemsStep 4: Implement a flexible infrastructureStep 5: Provide collaboration toolsStep 6: Use the Social Tools of choice6/13/2012 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 34
    35. 35. Step 5: Provide collaboration tools Collaboration Conferencing6/13/2012 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 35
    36. 36. Getting started with Social CRM Social CRMStep 1: Implement an Open CRM SystemStep 2: Customise the user interface and processesStep 3: Integrate the essential back end systemsStep 4: Implement a flexible infrastructureStep 5: Provide collaboration toolsStep 6: Use the Social Tools of choice 6/13/2012 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 36
    37. 37. Twitter Feeds on Your Dashboard6/13/2012 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 37
    38. 38. LinkedIn Accounts6/13/2012 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 38
    39. 39. Google Maps integration6/13/2012 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 39
    40. 40. Question: What is the Social CRM interface of the future? Answer: The social networking site of choice combined with An open CRM system6/13/2012 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 40
    41. 41. Hillel Uses Social CRM to Connect withCollege Students 6/13/2012 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 41
    42. 42. Add additional fields before saving to CRM 6/13/2012 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 42
    43. 43. Enter Friend Details in Facebook6/13/2012 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 43
    44. 44. Add people from Facebook to CRM 6/13/2012 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 44
    45. 45. Add Interactions in CRM from Facebook6/13/2012 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 45
    46. 46. Match Event Attendees with Contacts in CRM 6/13/2012 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 46
    47. 47. Contact Profile Page 6/13/2012 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 47
    48. 48. Write Comments to Facebook Wall from CRM 6/13/2012 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 48
    49. 49. Link Existing Contacts to Facebook Friends6/13/2012 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 49
    50. 50. Type the names of Facebook friends6/13/2012 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 50
    51. 51. Facebook Friend Request 6/13/2012 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 51
    52. 52. Mobile Interactions Result: Goal exceeded by 500%6/13/2012 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 52
    53. 53. Components of a Social CRMConferencing Cloud • • • •Collaboration Social6/13/2012 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 53
    54. 54. Social Business and social CRM Start with the customer Choose an Open CRM System Enable a flexible, Cloud 2.0 infrastructure Integrate Collaboration and conferencing Allow Users to use their social tools of choice6/13/2012 ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 54
    55. 55. Microsoft The Sweeter RoadOracleSFDC ©2011 SugarCRM Inc. All rights reserved. 55 6/13/2012 55
    56. 56. Thank you Tom Schustertschuster@sugarcrm.com

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