Ken meter cashasta12.1

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July 10, 2012 "Mount Shasta and Lassen Region Farm & Food Economy" by Ken Meter

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Ken meter cashasta12.1

  1. 1. Photo: Edible Shasta-Butte The role of local food in economic recovery in the Shasta/Lassen region Ken Meter Crossroads Resource Center (Minneapolis) California Center for Cooperative Development Growing Local Coalition Redding and Anderson, CaliforniaDan & Malinda Martin — Lazy 69 Farm July 10, 2012
  2. 2. ―Finding Food in Farm Country‖ Studiesplus Maui & Hawai’i83 regions (incl. 10 states) in 30 states & one province
  3. 3. Vision for local food economiesBuild: Health Wealth Connection Capacity
  4. 4. ―Local‖ foods may be the best pathtoward economic recovery in U.S.
  5. 5. ―Local‖ is a shorthand....Photo: DSC
  6. 6. Goal: to build Community-Based Food SystemsPhoto: DSC
  7. 7. Business Clusters Kroger AthensAthens Farmers’ MarketFarms Athens, Ohio ACENetCrumb’s Bakery Food processing businesses Casa Nueva
  8. 8. Dix/Hall Farm — Pomeroy, Ohio
  9. 9. Warren Taylor — Pomeroy, Ohio
  10. 10. Kroger Athens 13 Independent Stores in Ohio22 Whole Foods Truckers Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams Snowville Creamery Local laborEquipmentsuppliers Utilities Dix/Hall farm Packaging material Hamm farm suppliers
  11. 11. Snowville at Paw Paw Fest
  12. 12. Business Clusters Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams―Our growth is based on Snowville’s growth....We are always in communication with each other.‖ – Jeni Britton Bauer
  13. 13. Snowville at Paw Paw Fest
  14. 14. green energy electricity, fuel, wate r Strawberries Raspberries nanofiltered Blueberries skim milk Peaches Pears Apricots Jeni’s Splendid Milk: Sweet Corn Ice Creams Snowville Creamery Basil Honey etc: from various Ohio farms Local EmployeesProcess own flavors Employees in season buy local
  15. 15. Next stepsNew collaboration:• Snowville Creamery brings produce & milk to Columbus• Columbus Food Bank stores these foods at warehouse• The Greener Grocer sells these foods in retail store
  16. 16. Next stepsThis is viewed as a step toward delivering fresh food to low-income consumers
  17. 17. Finding Food in the Shasta/Lassen Counties: Region Lassen Modoc Shasta Siskiyou Tehama Trinity Map: Southern California Equestrian Network
  18. 18. The Shasta/Lassen Region • 344,116 residents • Receive $11 billion of income each year
  19. 19. Personal income in Shasta Region, 2001 - 2010 4.0 3.5 3.0$ billions (2010) 2.5 Manufacturing Retail Professional / scientific 2.0 Health care & social assistance Government 1.5 Finance & Insurance Interest, dividend, rent 1.0 Transfer payments 0.5 - 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010
  20. 20. households - 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 14,000 16,000 Less than $10,000 $10,000 to $14,999 $15,000 to $19,999Source: Federal Census $20,000 to $24,999 $25,000 to $29,999 $30,000 to $34,999 $35,000 to $39,999 $40,000 to $44,999 (29%) below 100,000 people 185% of poverty $45,000 to $49,999 $50,000 to $59,999 $60,000 to Household income in Shasta Region, 2006-2010 $74,999 $75,000 to $99,999 $100,000 to $124,999 $125,000 to $149,999 $150,000 to $199,999 $200,000 or more
  21. 21. The Shasta/Lassen Region Food & Farm Economy • 5,159 farms • 6% of California’s farmsSource: USDA Agriculture Census 2007 Photo: Edible Shasta—Butte
  22. 22. The Shasta/Lassen Region Food & Farm Economy • 63% of farms sell less than $10,000 • 11% sell more than $100,000Source: USDA Agriculture Census 2007
  23. 23. The Shasta/Lassen Region Food & Farm Economy54% of farmsare less than50 acres Photo: Edible Shasta—Butte
  24. 24. The Shasta/Lassen RegionFood & Farm Economy Cattle & Calves $105 Fruits, nuts & berries** 104 Forage (hay, etc.)** 58 Ornamentals** 49 Vegetables** 32 Milk 14 Wheat** 11 ** incomplete data
  25. 25. Photo: Edible Shasta—Butte
  26. 26. the Shasta/Lassen Region Food & Farm Economy• 156 vegetable farms• over $32 million sales Source: USDA Agriculture Census 2007
  27. 27. The Shasta/Lassen Region Food & Farm Economy • 1,002 farms sold over $104 million of fruitSource: USDA Agriculture Census 2007 Photo: Edible Shasta—Butte
  28. 28. 614 farms sell direct to consumers $2.2 million in sales 34% rise in farms 9% rise in sales 2002 - 2007Source: Census of Agriculture 2007 Photo: Edible Shasta—Butte
  29. 29. the Shasta/Lassen Region Food & Farm Economy• 97 farms sell organic products• $13 million in sales Photo: Edible Shasta—Butte
  30. 30. Photo: Edible Shasta—Butte
  31. 31. Farm Production Balance in Shasta/Lassen Region, 1969-2010 0.7 0.6 Cash Receipts Production expenses 0.5 Balance$ billions (current) 0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1 0.0 1969 1971 1973 1975 1977 1979 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1991 1993 1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 -0.1 Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis
  32. 32. Farm Production Balance in Shasta/Lassen Region, 1969-2010 0.8 Cash receipts 0.7 Production expenses 0.6 Balance$ billions (2010 dollars) 0.5 0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1 0.0 1977 1969 1971 1973 1975 1979 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1991 1993 1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 -0.1Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis
  33. 33. Farm Production Balance in Shasta/Lassen Region, 1969-2010 0.8 Cash receipts 0.7 Production expenses 0.6 Balance$ billions (2010 dollars) 0.5 0.4 0.3 0.2 $5 million less than 1969 0.1 0.0 1969 1971 1973 1975 1977 1979 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1991 1993 1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 -0.1 $500 million gain since 1989Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis
  34. 34. The Shasta/Lassen Region Food & Farm Economy • Farmers produce $495 million of products per year And… • Spend $473 million to raise them Gain $22 million from production Averages for (1989-2010)Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis
  35. 35. The Shasta/Lassen Region Food & Farm Economy Plus… • Farm families earn $35 million of other farm-related income • And receive $13 million in federal supports each yearSource: Bureau of Economic Analysis
  36. 36. Shasta/Lassen Region farm income by type, 1969-2010 0.25 0.20 Government Payments$ billions (2010 dollars) 0.15 Other Farm-Related Income Farm Production Balance 0.10 0.05 0.00 1969 1971 1973 1975 1977 1979 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1991 1993 1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 -0.05 -0.10Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis
  37. 37. Photo: Edible Shasta—Butte
  38. 38. Crop and livestock sales in Shasta/Lassen Region, 1969-2010 0.6 0.5 Livestock$ billions (2010 dollars) Crops 0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1 0.0 1987 2001 1969 1971 1973 1975 1977 1979 1981 1983 1985 1989 1991 1993 1995 1997 1999 2003 2005 2007 2009Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis
  39. 39. 33% of all farmsreported netlosses in 2007
  40. 40. Farm production expenses in Shasta/Lassen Region, 1969-2010 0.14 Feed purchased Livestock purchased 0.12 Seed purchased Fertlizer and Lime Petroleum products$ billions (2010 dollars) 0.10 Hired farm labor 0.08 0.06 0.04 0.02 0.00 1981 2007 1969 1971 1973 1975 1977 1979 1983 1985 1987 1989 1991 1993 1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2009Source: Bureau of Economic Analysis
  41. 41. $235 million of these farm inputs are sourced outside the regionSource: Ken Meter using data from Agriculture Census 2007
  42. 42. Using local inputs would reduce these lossesCompost at Pleasantview Farm (Circleville)
  43. 43. Also a region of food consumers...
  44. 44. Finding Food in Farm Country As farmers struggle... • Consumers buy $912 million of food each year • $800 million from outside regionSource: Ken Meter using Bureau of Labor Statistics
  45. 45. Finding Food in the Shasta/Lassen Region Markets for food eaten at home millions Meats, poultry, fish, and eggs $ 116 Fruits & vegetables 98 Cereals and bakery products 68 Dairy products 57 ―Other,‖ incl. sweets, fats, & oils 193Source: Census & BLS
  46. 46. All told, the Shasta/Lassen Region• Gains $22 million in production• Loses $235 million buying inputs• Loses $800 million buying food Potential wealth lost each year
  47. 47. Finding Food in Farm Country Total loss is:• $1 billion each year!• more than double the value of all food products raised in region
  48. 48. The good news is... Photo: Edible Shasta—Butte
  49. 49. Farm Production Balance in Current farm income compared to the Shasta/Lassen Region, 1969-2010 market Shasta/Lassen Region consumer 0.8 consumer market Cash receipts 0.7 Production expenses 0.6 Balance$ billions (2010 dollars) 0.5 0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1 0.0 1977 1969 1971 1973 1975 1979 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1991 1993 1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 -0.1Source: BEA and BLS
  50. 50. The Shasta/Lassen RegionIf region’s consumers bought $5 oftheir food directly from local farmseach week... …farms would earn $89 million of new farm income
  51. 51. The Shasta/Lassen Region is not alone...
  52. 52. Data from each county in the Shasta/Lassen RegionPhotos: Edible Shasta—Butte
  53. 53. Farm Production Balance in Lassen County, California, 1969-2010 120 Cash receipts Production expenses 100 Balance$ millions (2010 dollars) 80 60 40 20 0 2003 1969 1971 1973 1975 1977 1979 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1991 1993 1995 1997 1999 2001 2005 2007 2009 -20Bureau of Economic Analysis
  54. 54. Farm Production Balance in Modoc County, California, 1969-2010 200 Cash receipts Production expenses 150 Balance$ millions (2010 dollars) 100 50 0 1993 1969 1971 1973 1975 1977 1979 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1991 1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 -50Bureau of Economic Analysis
  55. 55. Farm Production Balance in Shasta County, California, 1969-2010 100 Cash receipts 80 Production expenses Balance$ millions (2010 dollars) 60 40 20 0 1993 1969 1971 1973 1975 1977 1979 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1991 1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 -20 -40Bureau of Economic Analysis
  56. 56. Farm Production Balance in Siskiyou County, California, 1969-2010 250 Cash receipts Production expenses 200 Balance$ millions (2010 dollars) 150 100 50 0 1993 1969 1971 1973 1975 1977 1979 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1991 1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009Bureau of Economic Analysis
  57. 57. Farm Production Balance in Tehama County, California, 1969-2010 250 Cash receipts Production expenses 200 Balance$ millions (2010 dollars) 150 100 50 0 1989 1969 1971 1973 1975 1977 1979 1981 1983 1985 1987 1991 1993 1995 1997 1999 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009 -50 -100Bureau of Economic Analysis
  58. 58. Farm Production Balance in Trinity County, California, 1969-2010 10 Cash receipts Production expenses 8 Balance 6$ millions (2010 dollars) 4 2 0 1995 2005 1969 1971 1973 1975 1977 1979 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1991 1993 1997 1999 2001 2003 2007 2009 -2 -4 -6Bureau of Economic Analysis
  59. 59. State of CaliforniaSource: USDA Agriculture Census 2007
  60. 60. Top Farm Products in California Top Farm Products in California, 2010 Grapes 10% Almonds Cattle & Calves 9% Ornamentals 7% 12% Strawberries 6% Dairy Lettuce 19% 5% Other Tomatoes 18% 4% Pistachios Walnuts 4% Rice 3% 3%Economic Research Service (2010)
  61. 61. Farm Production Balance in California, 1969-2010 45 Cash receipts 40 Production expenses Balance 35$ billions (2010 dollars) 30 25 20 15 10 5 0 2001 1969 1971 1973 1975 1977 1979 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1991 1993 1995 1997 1999 2003 2005 2007 2009Bureau of Economic Analysis
  62. 62. U.S. data
  63. 63. Farm production balance for U.S. farms, 1929 -2011 400 350 U.S. Data Cash receipts 300 Production expenses Farm Production Balance$ billions (current dollars) 250 200 150 100 50 0 1929 1932 1935 1938 1941 1944 1947 1950 1953 1956 1959 1962 1965 1968 1971 1974 1977 1980 1983 1986 1989 1992 1995 1998 2001 2004 2007 2010 -50USDA / Economic Research Service
  64. 64. Farm Production Balance for U.S. farms, 1929 - 2011 500 450 U.S. Data 400 350$ billions (2011 dollars) 300 250 200 Cash receipts 150 Production expenses Farm Production Balance 100 50 0 1929 1932 1935 1938 1941 1944 1947 1950 1953 1956 1959 1962 1965 1968 1971 1974 1977 1980 1983 1986 1989 1992 1995 1998 2001 2004 2007 2010 -50USDA / Economic Research Service
  65. 65. $ billions (2011) 0 5 10 15 20 25 1949 1951 1953 1955 1957 1959 1961 1963 U.S. Data 1965 1967 1969 1971 1973USDA / Economic Research Service 1975 1977 1979 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1991 1993 1995 1997 1999 Value of food reserved by U.S. farmers for home consumption, 1949 - 2009 2001 2003 2005 2007 2009
  66. 66. Sugar and Corn Sweetener Use in U.S., 1966 - 2008 160 140 Sugar 120 HFCSpounds per person Glucose 100 Dextrose 80 All sweeteners 60 40 20 0 1966 1968 1970 1972 1974 1976 1978 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 1998 2000 2002 2004 2006 2008USDA / Economic Research Service
  67. 67. U.S. Youth Who are Overweight Percent by AgePercent 16 14.0% 14 12 10.7% 13% 10 10.7% 8 6 4.6% 4 4.1% 2 0 1963-70 1971-74 1976-80 1988-94 1999 Ages 6-11 Ages 12-17 >95th percentile for BMI by age and sex, based on NHANES I reference data Source: Troiano RP, Flegal KM. Pediatrics 1998;101(3):497-504. NHANES 1999, National Center for Health Statistics. Chart by Melinda Hemmelgarn
  68. 68. Consumption out of balance • 50% of U.S. public school students qualify for free / reduced lunch • 10% of households are ―food insecure‖Source: USDA Mural: The Food Project
  69. 69. 3,000 deaths from foodborne illness each yearMedical costs: $152 billion
  70. 70. Health suffers Medical costs of obesity are $174 billion per year —Source: CDC/Walters, Harvard Public Health/Colditz
  71. 71. Growing Power, Milwaukee
  72. 72. Direct Food Sales
  73. 73. Census of Agriculture
  74. 74. Organic Sales
  75. 75. Organic Valley
  76. 76. $ millions - 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 80019881989199019911992199319941995199619971998199920002001200220032004 Organic Valley sales, 1988 - 2011200520062007200820092010 $716 million sales2011
  77. 77. Black Hawk region, Iowa
  78. 78. UNI Local Food Project 1998 3 institutions buy $111,000 of local foods 2009 26 buy $2,600,000
  79. 79. Local Food Expenditures by the participating institutions in the Black Hawk County Area, Iowa 1998-2009Northern Iowa Food & Farm Partnership
  80. 80. Jobs, Fruit & Veggies, and Black Hawk County regionIf Black Hawk region residents purchased locally grown fruits and vegetables just 3 months out of the year:• 475 new jobs• $6.3 million in labor income added to local economyDavid Swenson, ISU Economist
  81. 81. Will Allen, Growing Power, Milwaukee
  82. 82. Growing Power, Milwaukee
  83. 83. Greensgrow Gardens, Philadelphia
  84. 84. Greensgrow Gardens, Philadelphia
  85. 85. Greensgrow Gardens, Philadelphia
  86. 86. Greensgrow Gardens, Philadelphia
  87. 87. Pete Scherf — Michigan City, Indiana
  88. 88. Viroqua, Wisconsin
  89. 89. Viroqua, Wisconsin• Economic Development Association buys building• 100,000 square feet• Regional food processing center
  90. 90. Viroqua Business Cluster Produce Distributor 1 Produce Distributor 2 Processors TBD Bakery & Public Space Nonprofits
  91. 91. Viroqua Business Cluster Hospital Produce Distributor 1Rootcellar Produce Distributor 2Food Processors Organic TBD Valleyco-opSchools Bakery & Public Space Amish Nonprofits farmers
  92. 92. Viroqua, Wisconsin
  93. 93. U.S. Federal Policy Invest in communities rather than cash for commodities
  94. 94. Vision for local food economiesBuild: Health Wealth Connection Capacity
  95. 95. ―Finding Food in Farm Country‖ www.crcworks.org (612) 869-8664 kmeter@crcworks.org

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