Sustainable Cities Initiative
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  • The story begins with an informal agreement between the county government, the regional agency, and the state DOT in the late 1980’s to build a bypass. Why was the bypass considered necessary? Washington County was rooted in agriculture until the 1960’s when the trend towards suburbanization of households greatly accelerated and was joined by huge increases in commercial and industrial growth. Especially high tech… thus the name the Silicon Forest.
  • How can we take existing classes/resources, apply them to cities, and push sustainability efforts in these cities

Sustainable Cities Initiative Presentation Transcript

  • 1. The Citizens’ Role in Creating Sustainable Communities in Oregon Robert Liberty, Sustainable Cities Initiative, University of Oregon June 2011
  • 2. Public Involvement
  • 3.  
  • 4. The problem, as initially defined .
  • 5.  
  • 6.  
  • 7.  
  • 8.
    • Goal 1 - Citizen Involvement
    • Goal 2 - Land Use Planning
    • Goal 3 - Agriculture Lands
    • Goal 4 - Forest Lands
    • Goal 5 - Open Spaces, Scenic and Historic Area, and Natural Resources
    • Goal 6 - Air, Water and Land Resources Quality
    • Goal 7 - Areas Subject to Natural Disasters and Hazards
    • Goal 8 - Recreation Needs
    • Goal 9 - Economy of the State
    • Goal 10 - Housing
    • Goal 11 - Public Facilities and Services
    • Goal 12 - Transportation
    • Goal 13 - Energy
    • Goal 14 - Urbanization
    • Goal 15 - Willamette Greenway
    • Goal 16 - Estuarine Resources
    • Goal 17 - Coastal Shorelands
    • Goal 18 - Beaches and Dunes
    • Goal 19 - Ocean Resources
    • Goal 1 - Citizen Involvement
    • Goal 2 - Land Use Planning
    • Goal 3 - Agriculture Lands
    • Goal 4 - Forest Lands
    • Goal 5 - Open Spaces, Scenic and Historic Area, and Natural Resources
    • Goal 6 - Air, Water and Land Resources Quality
    • Goal 7 - Areas Subject to Natural Disasters and Hazards
    • Goal 8 - Recreation Needs
    • Goal 15 - Willamette Greenway
    • Goal 16 - Estuarine Resources
    • Goal 17 - Coastal Shorelands
    • Goal 18 - Beaches and Dunes
    • Goal 19 - Ocean Resources
    • Goal 9 - Economy of the State
    • Goal 10 - Housing
    • Goal 11 - Public Facilities and Services
    • Goal 12 - Transportation
    • Goal 13 - Energy
    • Goal 14 - Urbanization
    • Goal 1 - Citizen Involvement
    • Goal 2 - Land Use Planning
    Oregon’s Development & Conservation Goals
  • 9. Goal 14 Urbanization
    • Urban Growth Boundaries
    • Urban growth boundaries shall be established and maintained by cities, counties and regional governments to provide land for urban development needs and to identify and separate urban and urbanizable land from rural land .
  • 10. Goal 12 Transportation
    • To provide and encourage a safe, convenient and economic transportation system.
    • A transportation plan shall ( 1) consider all modes of transportation including mass transit, air, water, pipeline, rail, highway, bicycle and pedestrian; (2) be based upon an inventory of local, regional and state transportation needs; (3) consider the differences in social consequences that would result from utilizing differing combinations of transportation modes; (4) avoid principal reliance upon any one mode of transportation; (5) minimize adverse social, economic and environmental impacts and costs; (6) conserve energy; (7) meet the needs of the transportation disadvantaged by improving transportation services; (8) facilitate the flow of goods and services so as to strengthen the local and regional economy; and (9) conform with local and regional comprehensive land use plans.
  • 11. Professor, Urban Planning and Policy Development Program Research Associate, Alan M. Voorhees Transportation Center Urban travel behavior as the outcome of public policy: The example of modal-split in Western Europe and North America JAPA 1988 Prof. John Pucher Rutgers University
  • 12. Land Use Transportation Air Quality (LUTRAQ) Alternatives
    • No build
    • New connector highway*
    • New connector highway with demand management including road pricing
    • Changing land use patterns*
    • Changing land use patterns plus TDM and road pricing*
    • * Included extending light rail line
  • 13. Table 2-6: Vehicle Hours of Delay (P.M. Peak Hour) 1370 1210 1670 2930 Total 460 370 540 830 Minor Arterials 520 470 660 960 Major Arterials 390 370 470 1140 Freeway LUTRAQ +TDM 200 430 370 1000 LUTRAQ Hwy + TDM Hwy only No Build Hours of Delay
  • 14. Figure 2-1: Percentage of Work Trips by Mode No build Highway only Highway + TDM LUTRAQ LUTRAQ TODs LUTRAQ + TDM LUTRAQ + TDMS TODs
  • 15. The LUTRAQ Project Results LUTRAQ vs. Highways Only Option 22.5% fewer works trips made by SOV 27% more trips made by walking and transit 21% greater access to jobs (30 minutes to 1/2 million jobs) 7.9% less emissions of greenhouse gases 6.0 - 8.7% less air pollutants (NOx, hydrocarbons, CO) 7.9% less energy consumed
  • 16.  
  • 17. Implementing LUTRAQ
  • 18. The Round at Beaverton Central Transit Oriented Development Implementing LUTRAQ
  • 19.  
  • 20. Monitoring Enforcement New Ideas
  • 21. Clarifying the Meaning of the Goals
  • 22.  
  • 23. Sustainable City Year The Sustainable Cities Initiative is perhaps the most comprehensive effort by a U.S. university to infuse sustainability into its curricula and community outreach.
  • 24.
    • 27 Faculty
    Sustainable City Year 2010-11
    • 30 Courses
    • 10 Disciplines / 2 Universities
    • 500+ students
    • 80,000 hours of student time
    • 16 Projects
  • 25.  
  • 26. Elements of Success
    • Political leadership in adoption
    • Clear, simple regulations
    • Long-term commitment to implementation
    • Adjustments to improve
    • And one more critical element…
  • 27. The Citizens’ Role in Creating Sustainable Communities in Oregon Robert Liberty, Sustainable Cities Initiative, University of Oregon June 2011