Andy Cotugno LTI Presentation
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  • Metropolitan Planning Organization Designation and Redesignation Rule, 23 C.F.R. § 450.310 (2007), available at http://www.fhwa.dot.gov/hep/23cfr450.htm#sec.450.310Joint Policy Advisory Committee on Transportation (JPACT) Bylaws, available athttp://library.oregonmetro.gov/files/jpact_bylaws_021508.pdfMetro Policy Advisory Committee (MPAC) Bylaws (Mar. 1996), available at http://library.oregonmetro.gov/files//mpac_bylaws_june2009_web.pdfMetro Regional Government, Metro Charter ch. 5 § 26 (Nov. 1992), available athttp://www.oregonmetro.gov/index.cfm/go/by.web/id=629
  • Metro Regional Transportation Plan (June 2010), available athttp://library.oregonmetro.gov/files//2035_rtp_final_document_as_submitted_to_dlcd_usdot_web.pdf
  • Regional High Capacity Transit System Plan (June 2010), available at http://library.oregonmetro.gov/files//hct_plan_june2010_web.pdf
  • Multnomah County Voters Pamphlet, Metro Measure No. 26-26: Bonds to Preserve Open Space, Parks; Protect Streams, Fish, Wildlife (May 16, 1995), available at http://www.co.multnomah.or.us/dbcs/elections/1995-05/voters_pamphlet.pdfMultnomah County Voters Pamphlet, Metro Measure No. 26-80: Bonds to Preserve Natural Areas, Clean Water, Protect Fish, Wildlife (Nov. 7, 2006), available at http://www.co.multnomah.or.us/dbcs/elections/2006-11/voters_pamphlet.pdf
  • Nature in Neighborhoods, Metro Code Title 13 §§ 3.07.1310 to 3.07.1370 (Jan. 13, 2011), available at http://www.oregonmetro.gov/index.cfm/go/by.web/id=274

Andy Cotugno LTI Presentation Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Making the Land Use, Transportation, Air Quality Connection in Portland, Oregon, USA
    Andy Cotugno
    Metro Policy Advisor
    July 2011
  • 2. Growth in the Region
    Population Base
    • 1.8 million people (includes Clark County, Washington)
    • 3. 1.49 million people in Metro boundary (37% of the state)
    • 4. 571,000 people in the City of Portland
    • 5. 24 smaller cities (615 to 106,000 people each)
    • 6. Growth rate twice the
    national average
    Major Economic
    Trends
    • Growing industries
    • 7. Hi-tech (Intel)
    • 8. Solar (Solarworld)
    • 9. Clothing (Nike, Adidas)
    • 10. Metals
    • 11. Transport equipment
    • 12. Printing
    • 13. Retail & Service sector
    • 14. Declining industries
    • 15. Lumber/wood
    • 16. Paper
    • 17. Food processing
  • Metro Council Districts
  • 18. Metro region
  • 19. Metro jurisdictions
  • 20. Metro Council
    Joint Policy Advisory Committee on Transportation
    Metropolitan Policy Advisory Committee
    • Metro Council
    • 21. Cities
    • 22. Counties
    • 23. Special Districts
    • 24. TriMet
    • 25. Port
    • 26. State Agencies
    • 27. Metro Council
    • 28. Cities
    • 29. Counties
    • 30. ODOT
    • 31. TriMet
    • 32. Port
    Federal Mandate
    Metro Charter Mandate
  • 33. Metro Functions:
    • Land Use and Transportation Policy and Planning
    • 34. Urban parks and natural areas
    • 35. Solid waste disposal and recycling
    • 36. Convention, exhibition and spectator facilities
    • 37. The Oregon Zoo
  • Urban Growth Boundary & Framework Plan
    Light-Rail
    Public Private Partnerships
    Natural Areas
  • 38. Downtown in Decline
    • Freeways focusing growth in suburbs
    • 39. Downtown buildings razed to construct more parking lots
    • 40. Urban renewal replaces vibrant neighborhoods with sterile high-rise apartments
  • Highway Revolt
    • Harbor Freeway removed in 1976 to make way for Tom McCall Waterfront Park
    • 41. Mount Hood Freeway
    withdrawn in favor
    of light rail transit
    along the Banfield
    • Shift freeway money to multi-modal projects
  • Portland’s Backlash
    • In Portland, a backlash forms against a plan for massive freeway building that is already destroying urban
    neighborhoods
  • 42. The Pacific Northwest
  • 43. The Oregon Story
    "There is a shameless threat to our environment and to the whole quality of life: unfettered despoiling of the land. Sagebrush subdivisions, coastal 'condomania’...
    Governor Tom McCall
  • 44. The Oregon Story
    “...and the ravenous rampage of suburbia in the Willamette Valley all threaten
    to mock Oregon's status as the environmental model for the nation.”
    Tom McCall’s
    address to
    the Legislature,
    January 8, 1973
  • 45. Senate Bill 100
    • Legislature adopts pioneering 1973 statewide planning program to limit sprawl and protect forest and farms
    • 46. Legislation requires local
    plans to meet statewide
    goals; creates LCDC
    • Urbanization
    now focused
    inside urban
    growth boun-
    daries
  • 47. 2040 Concepts
    Base Case
    Concept A
    Concept B
    Concept C
    2040 Growth Concept adopted in 1995
    2040 Concept
  • 48. 2040 Growth Concept
    • 50-year vision for managing region’s growth
    • 49. Incorporates best parts of “Concepts for Growth” options
    • 50. Kicks off a major effort to enact the new regional vision through local plans
  • 2040 Theme:
    Growth in Centers
    • Compact urban centers built to human scale
    • 51. Mixed housing and commerce served with good transit
    • 52. Focus of civic
    activities and
    public services
    • Parking ratios
    established
  • 53. 2040 Theme:
    Protect Industry
    • Preserve Industrial Lands
    • 54. Maintain freight mobility on highways
    • 55. Ensure quality freight access to ports and industrial areas from region’s highway and rail network
  • 2040 Theme:
    Protect Rural Areas
    • Adopt 50-year Rural Reserves
    • 56. Create Green Corridors along rural state highways
    • 57. Mitigate urban overflow on rural routes
    • 58. Maintain rural separation between Metro region and neighbor cities
  • 2040 Theme:
    Nature in the City
    • Network of parks, trails and open spaces
    • 59. Protections for streams and upland natural areas
    • 60. Green Streets - designs that minimize runoff
    • 61. Employ regulatory and acquisition approaches to preservation and enhancement
  • Two Tracks for Transportation
    2035 RTP Investment Strategy
    Track 2:
    Community
    Building
    Track 1:
    Mobility
    Corridors
    Focused on
    place making
    Centered on major travel corridors
  • 62. Light Rail & Transit
  • 63.
  • 64. To date:
    • 50 miles Light-Rail, 7.3 miles in progress
    • 65. 4 miles Streetcar, 8 miles in progress
    • 66. 14.7 miles Commuter Rail
  • 67. Future High Capacity Transit
  • 68.
  • 69. Preservation of
    Natural Areas
    1995 measure
    • $136 million
    2006 measure
    • $227 million
  • Preservation of
    Natural Areas
    To date:
    • nearly 11,000 acres preserved
    • 70. more than 90 miles of rivers and streams protected
    • 71. more than one million trees planted
  • Within the UGB
    22,000 acres of Metro’s Bond Acquisitions. Public Parks, and public Open Spaces have been protected
  • 72. Within the UGB Title 13 (through regulation) protects 27,300 acres of Riparian Habitat outside of our Public parks and open spaces
  • 73. Public Private Partnerships
  • 74.
  • 75. Learn more about Metro at
    www.oregonmetro.gov
    Andrew C. Cotugno
    Metro
    503-797-1763
    Andy.Cotugno@oregonmetro.gov