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Chapter 12 powerpoint
 

Chapter 12 powerpoint

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    Chapter 12 powerpoint Chapter 12 powerpoint Presentation Transcript

    • Essentials of Fire Fighting 6th Edition Firefighter I Chapter 12 — Ground Ladders
    • Describe different construction types of ground ladders. Learning Objective 1 12–2
    • Identify the parts of a ladder including markings and labels. Learning Objective 2 12–3
    • Ground ladder construction is regulated by two NFPA® standards. 12–4
    • Firefighters should know the basic parts of a ladder. 12–5 (Cont.)
    • Firefighters should know the basic parts of a ladder. 12–6 (Cont.)
    • Firefighters should know the basic parts of a ladder. 12–7
    • REVIEW QUESTION What are the basic parts of fire service ladders? 12–8
    • Materials used for ladders must meet NFPA® 1931 specifications. 12–9
    • Ladder materials have various advantages and disadvantages. 12–10
    • REVIEW QUESTION How does a fire service ladder constructed of metal differ from one constructed of fiberglass? 12–11
    • Fire service ladders must have required markings and labels. 12–12
    • Ladders must have a certification label and other warning labels. 12–13 Ladder positioning label
    • REVIEW QUESTION What types of markings and labels do fire service ladders have? 12–14
    • Recognize the types of ladders used in the fire service. Learning Objective 3 12–15
    • Single ladders are also called wall or straight ladders. 12–16
    • Roof ladders are equipped with folding hooks to anchor the ladder. 12–17
    • Folding ladders are often single ladders used for interior attic access. 12–18
    • Extension ladders are made up of a base section and fly sections. 12–19
    • Combination ladders are designed to be self-supporting. 12–20
    • NFPA® 1901 contains information on apparatus-mounted ground ladders. 12–21
    • REVIEW QUESTION How do the five types of ladders used in the fire service compare with one another? 12–22
    • Explain the considerations addressed by ladder inspection, cleaning, and maintenance. Learning Objective 4 12–23
    • Some elements must be inspected on all types of ladders. 12–24
    • WARNING! Any ladder that has been subjected to direct flame contact, has been exposed to high heat, or has a heat sensor label that has changed color is unsafe for use and should be removed from service for testing. 12–25
    • There are inspection elements specific to each type of ladder. 12–26
    • CAUTION! Any indication of deterioration of the wood is reason for the ladder to be removed from service until it can be service tested. 12–27
    • Once inspection is complete, select the correct procedure to follow. 12–28
    • Service testing must be performed to ensure a ladder is fit for use. 12–29
    • REVIEW QUESTION What types of information do general ladder inspections look for? 12–30
    • Cleaning is more than just a matter of appearance, it can also impact function. 12–31
    • Maintenance and repair are two different processes firefighters should understand. 12–32
    • REVIEW QUESTION What are the general maintenance requirements for ground ladders? 12–33
    • Describe safety guidelines used when handling ladders. Learning Objective 5 12–34
    • Explain considerations taken when selecting, lifting, and lowering a ladder. Learning Objective 6 12–35
    • There are several ladder safety guidelines firefighters should know. 12–36 (Cont.)
    • WARNING! Ladders coming in contact with power sources may result in electrocution of anyone in contact with the ladder. 12–37
    • There are several ladder safety guidelines firefighters should know. 12–38 (Cont.)
    • There are several ladder safety guidelines firefighters should know. 12–39 (Cont.)
    • WARNING! Sliding down a ladder either feet first or head first – even in an emergency – is unsafe and may result in serious injury or death. 12–40
    • There are several ladder safety guidelines firefighters should know. 12–41
    • REVIEW QUESTION What are the guidelines for safely carrying, raising, lowering, and working on ladders? 12–42
    • The IC considers several factors when deciding where to place the ladder. 12–43
    • Ladder selection also requires other important information. 12–44
    • There are several guidelines to use for ladder length selection. 12–45
    • A ladder’s reach is not the same as the designated length. 12–46
    • REVIEW QUESTION What factors must be considered when selecting a ladder placement location? 12–47
    • Use proper lifting and lowering techniques to prevent personal injuries. 12–48
    • REVIEW QUESTION What techniques should be used to prevent personal injuries when lifting and lowering ladders? 12–49
    • Describe various methods for ladder carries. Learning Objective 7 12–50
    • Ladder carry requirements vary depending on the type. 12–51
    • Methods to remove ladders from apparatus depend on ladder location. 12–52
    • DISCUSSION QUESTIONS How are the ground ladders mounted on the different apparatus in your jurisdiction? Have you observed ladders being removed from racks, compartments, or a mechanically operated rack? 12–53
    • Firefighters must know certain information when using ground ladders on apparatus. 12–54
    • Procedures for removing side and top mounted ladders differ from flat mounted ladders. 12–55
    • REVIEW QUESTION What information must a firefighter know in order to use ground ladders? 12–56
    • The one-firefighter low-shoulder carry is for some single and roof ladders. 12–57
    • CAUTION! Carrying the forward end of a ladder at eye level impedes the carrier’s balance and visibility and increases the risk of the butt spurs striking someone else in the head. 12–58
    • The two-firefighter low-shoulder carry is also for some single and roof ladders. 12–59
    • The three-firefighter flat-shoulder carry is typically used on extension ladders. 12–60
    • The three-firefighter flat arm’s length carry begins with the fly section up. 12–61
    • The four-firefighter flat-shoulder carry is similar to the three person method. 12–62
    • The two-firefighter arm’s length on-edge carry is best with lightweight ladders. 12–63
    • There are some general procedures to use for carrying roof ladders. 12–64
    • Identify basic considerations and requirements for ground ladder placement. Learning Objective 8 12–65
    • Ladder placement responsibilities are often shared by different personnel. 12–66
    • There are two objectives when placing ground ladders. 12–67
    • Positioning will vary based on the task being accomplished. 12–68
    • Other ladder placement guidelines are also important to know. 12–69 (Cont.)
    • Other ladder placement guidelines are also important to know. 12–70 (Cont.)
    • Other ladder placement guidelines are also important to know. 12–71
    • REVIEW QUESTION What are the two objectives that must be met when placing ground ladders? 12–72
    • The distance of the butt end from the building is what determines ladder angle. 12–73
    • There are several ways to determine proper distance for ladder angles. 12–74
    • REVIEW QUESTION How can a firefighter determine the proper distance between the heel of the ladder and the building? 12–75
    • Describe various methods for ladder raises. Learning Objective 9 12–76
    • Methods for ladder raises require teamwork, smoothness, and rhythm. 12–77
    • The transition from ladder carry to raise should be done in one smooth motion. 12–78
    • Several considerations must be addressed before raising a ladder. 12–79 (Cont.)
    • WARNING! All ladders will conduct electricity, especially when wet, regardless of their construction material. 12–80
    • Several considerations must be addressed before raising a ladder. 12–81 (Cont.)
    • Several considerations must be addressed before raising a ladder. 12–82
    • The one-firefighter raise can be used for both single and extension ladders. 12–83
    • There is little difference if the ladder is parallel or perpendicular to the building for two-firefighter raises. 12–84
    • The three-firefighter flat raise can be used for heavier ladders. 12–85
    • The four-firefighter flat raise can be used for heavier extension ladders. 12–86
    • There are a number of ways a roof ladder can be deployed. 12–87
    • REVIEW QUESTION What considerations must be addressed before raising a ladder? 12–88
    • Compare procedures for moving ground ladders. Learning Objective 10 12–89
    • Two firefighters are required to pivot a ladder when needed. 12–90
    • Shifting raised ground ladders should be limited to short distances. 12–91
    • REVIEW QUESTION What are two methods of safely moving a ground ladder after it has been raised? 12–92
    • Explain the methods used to secure ladders. Learning Objective 11 12–93
    • Ground ladders must be secured whenever firefighters are climbing or working from the ladder. 12–94
    • There are several methods that can be used for heeling a ladder. 12–95
    • Tying in secures the ladder to a fixed object and should be done if possible. 12–96
    • REVIEW QUESTION How do the two methods used for securing ladders compare with one another? 12–97
    • Describe ladder climbing considerations. Learning Objective 12 12–98
    • There are several factors to consider when climbing ladders. 12–99 (Cont.)
    • There are several factors to consider when climbing ladders. 12–100
    • REVIEW QUESTION How can a firefighter climb a ladder so that there is the least possible amount of bounce and sway? 12–101
    • Indicate what methods can be used to work from a ladder. Learning Objective 13 12–102
    • Firefighters may be required to work with both hands while standing on a ground ladder. 12–103
    • WARNING! Do not exceed the rated load capacity of the ladder. To avoid overloading the ladder, allow only one firefighter on each section of a ladder at the same time. Be careful about stressing ladders laterally. 12–104
    • When working from a ladder, the ladder belt must be tightly strapped around your waist. 12–105
    • WARNING! Use a leg lock only when working from a ground ladder. Never use a leg lock on an aerial ladder. Extending or retracting the ladder could result in serious injury. 12–106
    • REVIEW QUESTION What methods can be used to secure a firefighter to a ladder when performing work? 12–107
    • Explain methods used for assisting a victim down a ladder. Learning Objective 14 12–108
    • Assisting a victim through a window requires specific placement. 12–109
    • At least four firefighters are needed to bring victims down the ground ladder. 12–110
    • The method chosen depends on whether the victim is conscious or unconscious. 12–111
    • Victim size also plays a part in the method used for lowering. 12–112
    • REVIEW QUESTION How many firefighters are needed to bring a victim down a ladder? 12–113
    • • Ground ladders are an essential tool used to access levels above and below ground level. • You must know the types of ground ladders your department uses, the parts and construction materials, and how to care for and maintain them. Summary 12–114 (Cont.)
    • • You must be able to select, carry, and place them to effectively gain access and perform your assigned tasks. • You must know the correct methods for safely climbing, working from, and assisting victims down ground ladders. Summary 12–115
    • Clean, inspect, and maintain a ladder. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 12-I-1. Learning Objective 15 12–116
    • Carry a ladder – One-firefighter low- shoulder method. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 12-I-2. Learning Objective 16 12–117
    • Carry a ladder – Two-firefighter low- shoulder method. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 12-I-3. Learning Objective 17 12–118
    • Carry a ladder – Three-firefighter flat- shoulder method. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 12-I-4. Learning Objective 18 12–119
    • Carry a ladder – Three-firefighter flat- arm's length method. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 12-I-5. Learning Objective 19 12–120
    • Carry a ladder – Two-firefighter arm’s length on-edge method. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 12-I-6. Learning Objective 20 12–121
    • Tie the halyard. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 12-I-7. Learning Objective 21 12–122
    • Raise a ladder – One-firefighter method. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 12-I-8. Learning Objective 22 12–123
    • Raise a ladder – Two-firefighter flat raise. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 12-I-9. Learning Objective 23 12–124
    • Raise a ladder – Two-firefighter beam raise. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 12-I-10. Learning Objective 24 12–125
    • Raise a ladder – Three- or four- firefighter flat raise. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 12-I-11. Learning Objective 25 12–126
    • Deploy a roof ladder – One-firefighter method. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 12-I-12. Learning Objective 26 12–127
    • Pivot a ladder – Two-firefighter method. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 12-I-13. Learning Objective 27 12–128
    • Shift a ladder – One-firefighter method. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 12-I-14. Learning Objective 28 12–129
    • Shift a ladder – Two-firefighter method. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 12-I-15. Learning Objective 29 12–130
    • Heel a ground ladder. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 12-I-16. Learning Objective 30 12–131
    • Leg lock on a ground ladder. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 12-I-17. Learning Objective 31 12–132
    • Assist a conscious victim down a ground ladder. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 12-I-18. Learning Objective 32 12–133
    • Assist an unconscious victim down a ground ladder. This objective is measured in Skill Sheet 12-I-19. Learning Objective 33 12–134