Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Building your assessments to meet course objectives -detc

262

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology, Business
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
262
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Think of a graduate or current student that particularly exemplifies the set of knowledge and skills that will make/has made that student successful in the real world. What knowledge and skills (related and unrelated to your discipline) does that person possess?Ask yourself, "above all else, we want to graduate students who can/will ........?When you find yourself complaining about what students can't or don't do, what do you most often identify?Think of a graduate or current student that particularly exemplifies the set of knowledge and skills that will make/has made that student successful in the real world. What knowledge and skills (related and unrelated to your discipline) does that person possess?Ask yourself, "above all else, we want to graduate students who can/will ........?When you find yourself complaining about what students can't or don't do, what do you most often identify?Think of a graduate or current student that particularly exemplifies the set of knowledge and skills that will make/has made that student successful in the real world. What knowledge and skills (related and unrelated to your discipline) does that person possess?Ask yourself, "above all else, we want to graduate students who can/will ........?When you find yourself complaining about what students can't or don't do, what do you most often identify?Think of a graduate or current student that particularly exemplifies the set of knowledge and skills that will make/has made that student successful in the real world. What knowledge and skills (related and unrelated to your discipline) does that person possess?Ask yourself, "above all else, we want to graduate students who can/will ........?When you find yourself complaining about what students can't or don't do, what do you most often identify?Think of a graduate or current student that particularly exemplifies the set of knowledge and skills that will make/has made that student successful in the real world. What knowledge and skills (related and unrelated to your discipline) does that person possess?Ask yourself, "above all else, we want to graduate students who can/will ........?When you find yourself complaining about what students can't or don't do, what do you most often identify?Think of a graduate or current student that particularly exemplifies the set of knowledge and skills that will make/has made that student successful in the real world. What knowledge and skills (related and unrelated to your discipline) does that person possess?Ask yourself, "above all else, we want to graduate students who can/will ........?When you find yourself complaining about what students can't or don't do, what do you most often identify?Think of a graduate or current student that particularly exemplifies the set of knowledge and skills that will make/has made that student successful in the real world. What knowledge and skills (related and unrelated to your discipline) does that person possess?Ask yourself, "above all else, we want to graduate students who can/will ........?When you find yourself complaining about what students can't or don't do, what do you most often identify?Think of a graduate or current student that particularly exemplifies the set of knowledge and skills that will make/has made that student successful in the real world. What knowledge and skills (related and unrelated to your discipline) does that person possess?Ask yourself, "above all else, we want to graduate students who can/will ........?When you find yourself complaining about what students can't or don't do, what do you most often identify?Think of a graduate or current student that particularly exemplifies the set of knowledge and skills that will make/has made that student successful in the real world. What knowledge and skills (related and unrelated to your discipline) does that person possess?Ask yourself, "above all else, we want to graduate students who can/will ........?When you find yourself complaining about what students can't or don't do, what do you most often identify?
  • Transcript

    • 1. Building Assessments to Meet Course Objectives
    • 2. Standards Authentic Tasks Criteria Rubric A L L O W S Score or  Student Benchmark Feedback
    • 3. An Overview of 4 Step Process1) Identify the goals2) Select an authentic task3) Identify the criteria for the task4) Create the rubric
    • 4. Departmental Mission Course Standards Course Goals Objectives
    • 5. Identify the Goals• Goals/objectives drive assessment – What knowledge and skills do you want the student to know/do?• Observable and measurable• Typically one sentence – What the student WILL do by the end of the module or course.
    • 6. How to Write Goals1) Reflect – Former students – Departmental standards – Complaints about students
    • 7. 2) Review – Look at other sources – Talk to colleagues – Look for items that you didn’t list before. Do they need to be included?
    • 8. 3) Write – Look at the verb phrase – Avoid words like “understand, develop, or appreciate” – Not too broad—can be reasonably assessed with one or two assessments; covers at least half of the subject matter of a course – Doesn’t refer to a specific task that the students will do
    • 9. Introduction to the GroupsTLT 419 TLT 321 Group Member 1 Group Member 1 Group Member 2 Group Member 2 Group Member 3 Group Member 3 Group Member 4 Group Member 4TLT 234 TLT 112 Group Member 1 Group Member 1 Group Member 2 Group Member 2 Group Member 3 Group Member 3 Group Member 4 Group Member 4
    • 10. GROUP WORK1. On the DETC Assessment—Final Project blog page, find the groups and the links to your fake courses in the content section2. Read your group’s course description and goals.3. Decide whether the course goals have been written correctly. If not, rewrite them in correct terms.
    • 11. Select an Authentic Task• What indicates students have met these standards?• Easiest way to work from scratch? Do exactly what the standard says!• Ask “where/how would the student use this in the real world?”• How do you know if your assessment makes sense? GRASP IT!
    • 12. G-- Goal – Statement of the task – Establish the problem, challenge, or obstacleRASPIT
    • 13. GR– Role – Define the role of the student – State the jobs of the group membersASPIT
    • 14. GRA – Audience – Identify the target audience within the context of the scenario – Client, committee, someone with no knowledge of materialSPIT
    • 15. GRAS – Situation – Set the context for the scenario – Explain the situation and setting events for the projectPIT
    • 16. GRASP – Product and Performance – Clarify what the students will create and why – Set the ParametersIT
    • 17. GRASPI – Indicators – Provide students with a clear picture of success – Identify with the standards/goals/objectives – Issue rubrics to or develop them with the studentsT
    • 18. GRASPIT– Test it – Does it measure what you want it to measure? – Plug in fake student scores to check for accuracy
    • 19. G– GoalR– RoleA– AudienceS– SituationP– Product or PerformanceI– IndicatorsT– Test it
    • 20. EXAMPLE STANDARDS• Measure quantities using appropriate units, instruments, and methods• Setup and solve proportions• Develop scale models• Estimate amounts and determine levels of accuracy needed• Organize materials• Explain their thought process
    • 21. EXAMPLE ASSESSMENTRearrange the Room You are designing a space for a client. To help persuade your clients to rearrange the furniture you are going to make a two dimensional scale model of what the room would ultimately look like. Procedure: 1) You first need to measure the dimensions of the floor space in the room you want to rearrange, including the location and dimensions of all doors and windows. You also need to measure the amount of floor space occupied by each item of furniture in the room. These dimensions should all be explicitly listed. 2) Then use the given proportion to find the scale dimensions of the room and all the items. 3) Next you will make a scale blueprint of the room labeling where all windows and doors are on poster paper. 4) You will also make scale drawings of each piece of furniture on a cardboard sheet of paper, and these models need to be cut out. 5) Then you will arrange the model furniture where you want it on your blueprint, and tape them down. 6) You will finally write a brief explanation of why you believe the furniture should be arranged the way it is in your model.Your models and explanations will be posted in the room and the class will vote on which setup is thebest.
    • 22. GROUP WORK• Given the course goals for your fake courses, choose an authentic task to measure at least 2 of the goals. – You do not need to outline the full task
    • 23. Identify the Criteria• What does mastery performance look like?• How will I know if they’ve done well?• Task analysis
    • 24. What do Good Criterion Look Like?• Clearly stated – Written in language students understand.• Distinct and brief• Observable – Statement of behavior• Shared before the students begin the task
    • 25. Criteria Basics• Limit the number of criteria• You don’t have to assess everything in the task – Does it make sense to assess this?• Do your colleagues give similar assignments? – Ask colleagues who are unfamiliar with subject matter for their opinion
    • 26. “You may have noticed in the second example thatsome of the standards and some of the criteriasounded quite similar. For example, one standardsaid students will be able to develop scalemodels, and two of the criteria were accuracy ofmeasurements on the scale model and labels onthe scale model. Is this redundant? No, it meansthat your criteria are aligned with your standards.You are actually measuring on the task what yousaid you valued in your standards.” ~J. Mueller
    • 27. GROUP WORK• As a group, identify the criteria that are most important to you to assess within the task you have chosen. – Choose between 2-4 criteria
    • 28. Standards Authentic Tasks Criteria Rubric A L L O W S Score or  Student Benchmark Feedback
    • 29. Rubrics Basics and Building Blocks
    • 30. • Rubric: A scoring scale used to assess student performance along a task-specific set of criteria• Criterion Referenced Measures: a students aptitude on a task is determined by matching the students performance against a set of criteria to determine the degree to which the students performance meets the criteria for the task
    • 31. Components of Rubrics Levels of Performance Point ValuesCriteria Descriptors
    • 32. Create the rubric• Begin with the criteria• Analytic or holistic?
    • 33. Analytic Rubric• Performance is judged separately for each criterion• How fine of a distinction does it need to be? – 2 options (did or did not) – 5 options (Likert scale)
    • 34. Criteria Limited Acceptable Proficient most observations are clear andmade good observations observations are absent or vague all observations are clear and detailed detailedmade good predictions predictions are absent or irrelevant most predictions are reasonable all predictions are reasonable conclusion is absent or inconsistent conclusion is consistent with most conclusion is consistent withappropriate conclusion with observations observations observations
    • 35. Holistic Rubrics• Considers all criteria together• Potential problem: performance does not always fall into straight categories• Best for – Making a quick judgment that carries little weight in evaluation – Evaluating performance in which the criteria cannot be easily separated.
    • 36. Oral Presentation RubricMastery usually makes eye contact volume is always appropriate enthusiasm present throughout presentation summary is completely accurateProficiency usually makes eye contact volume is usually appropriate enthusiasm is present in most of presentation only one or two errors in summaryDeveloping sometimes makes eye contact volume is sometimes appropriate occasional enthusiasm in presentation some errors in summaryInadequate never or rarely makes eye contact volume is inappropriate rarely shows enthusiasm in presentation many errors in summary
    • 37. Analytic Vs. HolisticAnalytic Holistic• Assess each criterion • Quick judgment needs to be separately made• Better for large number of • Minor assessments criteria• Handles weighting of material better
    • 38. Levels of Performance• Clearer Expectations – Leads to a more consistent and objective assessment• Better feedback for students – Less effort in individual grading
    • 39. Descriptors• Language used to describe the behavior associated with a quantified score.• Do not have to have the same amount of performance levels for each criteria• More detail in the descriptors, the better a student can approach the task• “When a rubric is applied more consistently and objectively it will lead to greater reliability and validity in the results.”
    • 40. Assigning point values• Flexibility based on professor discretion• Points should be distributed across the levels of a rubric to best capture the value you assign to each level of performance
    • 41. Criteria never sometimes usuallymakes eye contact 0 2 4volume is appropriate 0 4enthusiasm is evident 0 4summary is accurate 0 4 8
    • 42. Checking Your Rubric• Let a colleague review it.• Let your students review it -- is it clear to them?• Check if it aligns or matches up with your standards.
    • 43. Checking Your Rubric• Create a fake student score – Is it representative of what you think it should be? – Adjust by adding weight to certain categories• Universal—can someone else use it to grade an assignment who is not versed in the subject matter• Monitor and adjust – Rubrics are works in progress

    ×