Reggio Emilia Philosophy<br />Presented by The Compass School, Cincinnati  2011<br />
Reggio Emilia Philosophy<br />	The Philosophy and schools bearing this city’s name were developed after WWII by a gentlema...
The Reggio Inspired Approach8 Principles<br />1. The image of the child: all children have potential, construct their own ...
Reggio Emilia, Italy<br />
TeatroMunicipale(Concerts, Operas, Ballet and dramatic performances )<br />
Piazza San Prospero<br />
Community and system: children, family, teachers, parents, and community are interactive and work together.<br />
Infant and Toddler CenterReggio Emilia, Italy<br />
Interest in environment and beauty: school and classrooms are beautiful places.<br />
The image of the child: all children have potential, construct their own learning, and are capable. <br />
PreschoolReggio Emilia, Italy<br />
Environmental stimulation: encourages activity, involvement, discovery, and using a variety of media. <br />
 Time not set by clock: respect for children's pace, time table, stay with teachers for several years, and relationships r...
Emergent curriculum/projects: child-centered, following their interest, returning again and again to add new insights.<br />
Documentation: observing, recording, thinking and showing children's learning. <br />
Collaboration by teachers: team, partners, working together, sharing information, sharing in projects.<br />
Loris Malaguzzi International Center Reggio Emilia, Italy                  (Professional Development)<br />
International study groups of educators from around the globe journey to Italy annually to get a first hand glimpse of thi...
The Compass School of CincinnatiA Reggio Inspired School for Young Children<br />
What does it mean to be “Reggio Inspired?”<br />Because in Italy this approach is integrated into the fabric of the local ...
Emergent Curriculum
Project Work
Role of the Teacher
Documentation
Parent and Community Involvement
Environment </li></li></ul><li>The Image of the Child<br />We view every child as strong, capable, independent, curious, a...
Curious<br />
Helpful<br />
Nurturing<br />
Inquisitive<br />
Imaginative<br />
Creative<br />
Capable<br />
Creative<br />
Capable<br />
Nurturing<br />
Creative<br />
Industrious<br />
Emergent Curriculum<br />	Teachers observe and document the interactions, discussions, and fascinations of children.  By d...
Project Work<br />	Our educators deliver this emergent curriculum through project work, which allows children to explore t...
Vet Project<br />
Circus Project<br />
Preschool Bird Project<br />
Toddler Castle Project<br />
Painting<br />
Sketching<br />
Sketching<br />
Constructing<br />
Field Work<br />
Field Work<br />
Real Materials to support project work.<br />
Reflection<br />
Sensorial Experiences<br />
Working Together<br />
Discussion<br />
Observation and Sketching<br />
Beautiful Junk Construction<br />
Open-ended Art Experiences<br />
Hypothesizing & Experimenting<br />
Touching and Manipulating<br />
Construction and Art<br />
Art and Sculpting<br />
Collaborating<br />
Building Community<br />
Art and Construction<br />
Visitors from the Community<br />
Current Kindergarten Project<br />Weather Project Inspired  Fashion Show<br />By Allison Greer<br />
Think, Pair and Share Ideas<br />
Gaining Background Knowledge<br />
Reflections on video<br />
Fashion inspiration with paper dolls<br />
Sharing ideas…<br />
Project Boards<br />
Problem solving<br />
Collaboration<br />
Respect for one another's ideas<br />
Project Board Conversations<br />
Runway Ideas<br />
Problem Solving<br />
Negotiating<br />
Reflection<br />
Runway design ideas…<br />
Runway production…<br />
Fashion Ideas…<br />
Painting the backdrops…<br />
The Role of the Teacher<br />	The teacher is viewed as a partner in learning, with the children.  By listening, observing,...
Observation<br />
Facilitating Conversation<br />
Providing Sensorial Experiences<br />
Being actively involved.<br />
Sharing and working together.<br />
Exposure<br />
Encouragement<br />
Working together<br />
Providing opportunities in the natural world.<br />
The Role of Environment<br />	The environment of the school (its classrooms, common spaces, and playground) is viewed as t...
Light and Shadow Studio<br />
Infant Classroom<br />
Infant Classroom<br />
Infant Wing<br />
Parent Meeting Area<br />
Documentation<br />
Toddler Wing<br />
Toddler Classrooms<br />
Preschool Classrooms<br />
Kindergarten Meeting Area<br />
Materials<br />
Light and Shadow Studio<br />
Family Meeting Area<br />
Collaborative Project with Families<br />
Materials<br />
Building Community…Earth Day Celebration on the Playground<br />
Outdoor Environment<br />
Utilizing the Natural World<br />
Community Meeting Area<br />
Parental Involvement<br />	Learning takes place not just within the school, but also at home and throughout the community....
Parents engaging young minds<br />
Community Celebrations<br />
Working with families to contribute to the broader community.<br />
Earth Day Celebration <br />
Parents contribute to classroom experiences.<br />
Documentation<br />	By documenting the children’s work through photographs, video, written word, displays, etc, teachers t...
Journaling (private communication between the parent and classroom teacher regarding the individual child.)<br />
Child Portfolio<br />
Documentation Panels<br />
Individual Portfolios<br />
Children’s work is displayed throughout the school.<br />
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Reggio presentation

  1. 1. Reggio Emilia Philosophy<br />Presented by The Compass School, Cincinnati 2011<br />
  2. 2. Reggio Emilia Philosophy<br /> The Philosophy and schools bearing this city’s name were developed after WWII by a gentleman named Loris Malaguzzi. <br /> The idea behind the philosophy was to create an environment of peace, communication, collaboration and respect for young children so that they may build a community of respect for the future generations and war would no longer be a part of the city. The government, community and people are all an integral part of the success of the schools in Reggio Emilia.<br />
  3. 3. The Reggio Inspired Approach8 Principles<br />1. The image of the child: all children have potential, construct their own learning, and are capable. <br /> <br />2. Community and system: children, family, teachers, parents, and community are interactive and work together.<br /> <br />3. Interest in environment and beauty: school and classrooms are beautiful places<br /> <br />4. Collaboration by teachers: team, partners, working together, sharing information, sharing in projects.<br /> <br />5. Time not set by clock: respect for children's pace, time table, stay with teachers for several years, and relationships remain constant.<br /> <br />6. Emergent curriculum/projects: child-centered, following their interest, returning again and again to add new insights.<br /> <br />7. Environmental stimulation: encourages activity, involvement, discovery, and using a variety of media. <br /> <br />8. Documentation: observing, recording, thinking and showing children's learning. <br /> <br /> <br />
  4. 4. Reggio Emilia, Italy<br />
  5. 5. TeatroMunicipale(Concerts, Operas, Ballet and dramatic performances )<br />
  6. 6. Piazza San Prospero<br />
  7. 7. Community and system: children, family, teachers, parents, and community are interactive and work together.<br />
  8. 8. Infant and Toddler CenterReggio Emilia, Italy<br />
  9. 9. Interest in environment and beauty: school and classrooms are beautiful places.<br />
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  29. 29. The image of the child: all children have potential, construct their own learning, and are capable. <br />
  30. 30.
  31. 31.
  32. 32. PreschoolReggio Emilia, Italy<br />
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  35. 35.
  36. 36.
  37. 37. Environmental stimulation: encourages activity, involvement, discovery, and using a variety of media. <br />
  38. 38.
  39. 39.
  40. 40.
  41. 41.  Time not set by clock: respect for children's pace, time table, stay with teachers for several years, and relationships remain constant.<br />
  42. 42.
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  44. 44.
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  48. 48.
  49. 49.
  50. 50. Emergent curriculum/projects: child-centered, following their interest, returning again and again to add new insights.<br />
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  63. 63.
  64. 64.
  65. 65. Documentation: observing, recording, thinking and showing children's learning. <br />
  66. 66.
  67. 67.
  68. 68.
  69. 69.
  70. 70. Collaboration by teachers: team, partners, working together, sharing information, sharing in projects.<br />
  71. 71.
  72. 72.
  73. 73. Loris Malaguzzi International Center Reggio Emilia, Italy (Professional Development)<br />
  74. 74. International study groups of educators from around the globe journey to Italy annually to get a first hand glimpse of this exceptional philosophy in action.<br />
  75. 75.
  76. 76.
  77. 77.
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  85. 85. The Compass School of CincinnatiA Reggio Inspired School for Young Children<br />
  86. 86. What does it mean to be “Reggio Inspired?”<br />Because in Italy this approach is integrated into the fabric of the local government, community, and its people, it cannot be exactly replicated in the United States.<br />To be “Reggio-Inspired” is to adopt the core values and beliefs of this approach to educating young children. <br />Such principles include:<br /><ul><li>The Image of the Child
  87. 87. Emergent Curriculum
  88. 88. Project Work
  89. 89. Role of the Teacher
  90. 90. Documentation
  91. 91. Parent and Community Involvement
  92. 92. Environment </li></li></ul><li>The Image of the Child<br />We view every child as strong, capable, independent, curious, and full of imagination. We empower children to think, question, investigate, explore, and help navigate the journey of learning.<br />We empower children to think, question, investigate, explore, and help navigate the journey of learning.<br /> <br />
  93. 93. Curious<br />
  94. 94. Helpful<br />
  95. 95. Nurturing<br />
  96. 96. Inquisitive<br />
  97. 97. Imaginative<br />
  98. 98. Creative<br />
  99. 99. Capable<br />
  100. 100. Creative<br />
  101. 101. Capable<br />
  102. 102. Nurturing<br />
  103. 103. Creative<br />
  104. 104. Industrious<br />
  105. 105. Emergent Curriculum<br /> Teachers observe and document the interactions, discussions, and fascinations of children. By developing learning opportunities from these observations, the curriculum “emerges” from children’s interests and ideas.<br />
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  116. 116. Project Work<br /> Our educators deliver this emergent curriculum through project work, which allows children to explore these areas of interest in detail. Projects may last a day, a week, a month, or even longer, depending on the interests of the group. Teachers are thoughtful about introducing a broad range of opportunities, from art to music to early language, math, science and nature experiences, in support of the project. By exploring projects of children’s interest in great detail, children are excited by the learning process. This enthusiasm for knowledge, combined with the ability to experience project work in detail, will foster a predisposition for “life-long” learning.<br />
  117. 117. Vet Project<br />
  118. 118. Circus Project<br />
  119. 119.
  120. 120. Preschool Bird Project<br />
  121. 121. Toddler Castle Project<br />
  122. 122. Painting<br />
  123. 123. Sketching<br />
  124. 124. Sketching<br />
  125. 125. Constructing<br />
  126. 126. Field Work<br />
  127. 127. Field Work<br />
  128. 128. Real Materials to support project work.<br />
  129. 129. Reflection<br />
  130. 130. Sensorial Experiences<br />
  131. 131. Working Together<br />
  132. 132. Discussion<br />
  133. 133. Observation and Sketching<br />
  134. 134. Beautiful Junk Construction<br />
  135. 135. Open-ended Art Experiences<br />
  136. 136. Hypothesizing & Experimenting<br />
  137. 137. Touching and Manipulating<br />
  138. 138. Construction and Art<br />
  139. 139. Art and Sculpting<br />
  140. 140. Collaborating<br />
  141. 141. Building Community<br />
  142. 142. Art and Construction<br />
  143. 143. Visitors from the Community<br />
  144. 144. Current Kindergarten Project<br />Weather Project Inspired Fashion Show<br />By Allison Greer<br />
  145. 145. Think, Pair and Share Ideas<br />
  146. 146.
  147. 147. Gaining Background Knowledge<br />
  148. 148. Reflections on video<br />
  149. 149. Fashion inspiration with paper dolls<br />
  150. 150.
  151. 151. Sharing ideas…<br />
  152. 152.
  153. 153. Project Boards<br />
  154. 154. Problem solving<br />
  155. 155.
  156. 156. Collaboration<br />
  157. 157.
  158. 158.
  159. 159.
  160. 160. Respect for one another's ideas<br />
  161. 161.
  162. 162.
  163. 163. Project Board Conversations<br />
  164. 164. Runway Ideas<br />
  165. 165. Problem Solving<br />
  166. 166. Negotiating<br />
  167. 167.
  168. 168. Reflection<br />
  169. 169.
  170. 170. Runway design ideas…<br />
  171. 171.
  172. 172.
  173. 173.
  174. 174. Runway production…<br />
  175. 175.
  176. 176.
  177. 177.
  178. 178.
  179. 179. Fashion Ideas…<br />
  180. 180.
  181. 181.
  182. 182. Painting the backdrops…<br />
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  184. 184.
  185. 185.
  186. 186.
  187. 187.
  188. 188.
  189. 189.
  190. 190.
  191. 191.
  192. 192. The Role of the Teacher<br /> The teacher is viewed as a partner in learning, with the children. By listening, observing, and documenting children’s work, the teacher is equipped to guide children’s learning experiences, and “co-construct” knowledge.<br />
  193. 193. Observation<br />
  194. 194. Facilitating Conversation<br />
  195. 195. Providing Sensorial Experiences<br />
  196. 196. Being actively involved.<br />
  197. 197. Sharing and working together.<br />
  198. 198. Exposure<br />
  199. 199. Encouragement<br />
  200. 200. Working together<br />
  201. 201. Providing opportunities in the natural world.<br />
  202. 202. The Role of Environment<br /> The environment of the school (its classrooms, common spaces, and playground) is viewed as the “third teacher.” The environment should be a reflection of the children, teachers, and parents who live and learn there. It should be thoughtful, imaginative, enticing, and respect the image of the child.<br />
  203. 203. Light and Shadow Studio<br />
  204. 204. Infant Classroom<br />
  205. 205.
  206. 206.
  207. 207.
  208. 208. Infant Classroom<br />
  209. 209.
  210. 210.
  211. 211.
  212. 212.
  213. 213. Infant Wing<br />
  214. 214. Parent Meeting Area<br />
  215. 215. Documentation<br />
  216. 216. Toddler Wing<br />
  217. 217. Toddler Classrooms<br />
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  220. 220.
  221. 221.
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  227. 227.
  228. 228.
  229. 229. Preschool Classrooms<br />
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  240. 240.
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  242. 242.
  243. 243.
  244. 244. Kindergarten Meeting Area<br />
  245. 245. Materials<br />
  246. 246. Light and Shadow Studio<br />
  247. 247. Family Meeting Area<br />
  248. 248. Collaborative Project with Families<br />
  249. 249. Materials<br />
  250. 250. Building Community…Earth Day Celebration on the Playground<br />
  251. 251. Outdoor Environment<br />
  252. 252. Utilizing the Natural World<br />
  253. 253. Community Meeting Area<br />
  254. 254. Parental Involvement<br /> Learning takes place not just within the school, but also at home and throughout the community. We encourage parents to participate in project work, special events, and the daily life of the school. We seek an integrated learning community, where teachers, parents, and administrators work together to meet the needs of the children.<br />
  255. 255. Parents engaging young minds<br />
  256. 256. Community Celebrations<br />
  257. 257. Working with families to contribute to the broader community.<br />
  258. 258. Earth Day Celebration <br />
  259. 259. Parents contribute to classroom experiences.<br />
  260. 260. Documentation<br /> By documenting the children’s work through photographs, video, written word, displays, etc, teachers tell the story of the children’s early childhood experiences. Every child has their own portfolio, consisting of art work, photographs, information related to developmental milestones, and more. Lesson plans, project boards, and Daily Highlights explain the work of the children, and communicate the life of the school to the community at-large.<br />
  261. 261. Journaling (private communication between the parent and classroom teacher regarding the individual child.)<br />
  262. 262. Child Portfolio<br />
  263. 263. Documentation Panels<br />
  264. 264. Individual Portfolios<br />
  265. 265. Children’s work is displayed throughout the school.<br />
  266. 266.
  267. 267.
  268. 268.
  269. 269.
  270. 270.
  271. 271. Thank you for allowing us to share! The end<br />
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