Cultural practices for disease control

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Cultural practices for disease control

  1. 1. Cultural Practices For Disease Control in Vineyards<br />Caine Thompson, Viticulturist, <br />Mission Estate Winery<br />
  2. 2. It Starts With Pruning<br />Purpose - to set vines up for growing season<br /> - remove innoculum sources<br /> - prune with balance in mind –avoid conjecstion<br />Cane pruning - number, selection, size, bud spacing, wrap<br />Spur pruning - number, buds, height?<br />
  3. 3.
  4. 4. Shoot Thinning For Space<br />Purpose – to remove surplus shoots and to moderate crop yield<br />Advantages – open canopy, aeration, spray penetration, light <br />How – cane prune – doubles, unders, heads<br />How – spur prune – shoots per spur?<br />Severity depends on site and also end use of fruit<br />
  5. 5. Leaf Plucking<br />Purpose – to open up bunch zone <br />Advantages – spray penetration, aeration, promotion of ripening, disease control –powdery, botrytis<br />Exposure – check with winery<br />Options – machine, hand, sheep<br />
  6. 6. Leaf Plucking<br />
  7. 7. Canopy Management<br />Tucking – keep shoots upright and within wires – care required<br />Shoot positioning – ultimate for disease control. Implemented at shoot thinning can be taken to actual shoot tying<br />
  8. 8. Canopy management<br />
  9. 9. Bunch Thinning<br />Purpose to moderate crop load/remove disease/reduce crowding<br />Timing – berries peas size<br />Supervision required<br />If pruned well, shoot thinned, positioned, then bunch thinning may not be required<br />Required when bunches touching/growing together and/or when crop load limits ripening potential<br />
  10. 10. Bunch Trash Removal <br />Seen to be perhaps the key for botrytis control in white varieties in particular<br />Collard leaf plucker – proven to clear trash from bunches and to significantly improve botrytis control at harvest<br />Chris Henry Canopy Blower – trials being conducted this year<br />
  11. 11. Flowers for insect control<br />Purpose to encourage bio control – parasitic wasp predation of LBAM<br />Sow every 10th row (30m)<br />Phacelia (3kg/ha) Buckwheat (25kg/ha)<br />Direct drill to reduce costs<br />Costs $26/ha<br />Prodigy costs $36/ha<br />Benefits soil structure<br />
  12. 12. Flowers for insect control<br />
  13. 13. Endopathegentic Control of Mealybug<br />Endopathegentic fungi being trialled in Virus Elimination Project<br />Natural product fungus – Biogro certified<br />Been used extensively in Greenhouses in NZ with good results<br />Being trialled in a 2ha trial comparing conventional vs fungi<br />
  14. 14. Endopathegentic Control of Mealybug<br />
  15. 15. Summary <br />Cultural management is the key for managing disease in an organic system<br />An open canopy is essential<br />Prune for shoot position<br />Shoothin for vine balance<br />Leaf pluck to open bunch zone<br />Balance is the key <br />

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