FIRSTFare 2013 overview of electronics-2014

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FIRSTFare 2013 overview of electronics-2014

  1. 1. Overview of Control System 2013/2014 Season Tim Bennington-Davis Mentor for team 1425 (Error Code Xero – Wilsonville) Robot Inspector FTA for 2014 Districts tbenningtondavis@ixiacom.com (503) 449-9507
  2. 2. Agenda What are the parts?  How do they fit together?  How does the system work?  Where can I learn more?  What advice can be passed along? 
  3. 3. Robot Data Schematic
  4. 4. Elements of the System National Instruments cRIO (brains)  Digital Sidecar (make signals available)  Power Distribution Board & Battery  Analog Breakout (analog inputs)  Pneumatics Breakout (drives solenoids)  Netbook Driver Station  Wireless Interface (802.11)  Camera  Motor controllers and relays 
  5. 5. cRIO Modular Controller, Industrial Strength  Comes with multiple interface modules  ◦ 2 Analog Input Modules  Plus 2 Analog Breakout ◦ 2 Digital Input/Output Modules  Connect via really big cable to Digital Sidecar ◦ 1 Digital Output Module  Use with Solenoid Breakout Veteran teams do not get new cRIO’s and modules  Rookie teams will get new smaller cRIO 
  6. 6. cRIO and Modules Legacy Teams have 8-slot cRIO chassis Rookie teams will get new 4-slot cRIO
  7. 7. Digital Sidecar Connects to cRIO9403 with 32-pin cable  Provides  ◦ 10 PWM outputs (Victors, Jaguars, RC servos)  Can be configured on a per-output basis to drive 6V RC servos with jumpers ◦ ◦ ◦ ◦ 14 GPIO with +5V on each (digital in/out) 16 Relay Outputs (drives Spikes) I2C headers (Standard and NXT-compatible) 12V supply,  Provides +5V output  Reverse polarity protected
  8. 8. Digital Sidecar
  9. 9. Power Distribution Module Custom Design by FIRST  6-15 VDC, reverse polarity protected  Metric shanks, not SAE!  8 outputs for 40A breakers  12 outputs for 30A/20A breakers  24VDC output for CompactRIO  12V output  5V output for camera  LED’s for power supplies and open breakers 
  10. 10. Power Distribution Module
  11. 11. Power Distribution Diagram
  12. 12. Battery 12 VDC, sealed lead-acid  MUST use one of two models  ◦ MK ES17-12 ◦ Enersys NP18-12 Battery Exchange in Oregon City can get them  Don’t wait too long to order 
  13. 13. Analog Breakout Supplies +5V/3A for powering sensors  8 Analog Inputs, 3 pin PWM cable config.  Mounts to NI 9201 Analog Module  Configurable to make one input capable of measuring battery voltage - mandatory  LED to indicate unit has power  Power to unit requires wiring to power distribution module 
  14. 14. Analog Breakout
  15. 15. Pneumatics Breakout Reverse-battery protection  8 Outputs to directly drive solenoids  Mounts to NI 9472 Digital Module  Means you don’t have to use Spikes to drive solenoids anymore  ◦ Save weight, space and money LED to indicate unit has power  Power to unit requires wiring to power distribution module, can tolerate 12v or 24v to match solenoids 
  16. 16. Pneumatics Breakout
  17. 17. Wireless Bridge – DAP-1522 802.11n MIMO  Must use DAP-1522, Rev B1  You will assign fixed IP addresses to your components, using team number 
  18. 18. Powering the DAP-1522 DC-DC converter must be used  Converts 12 VDC to 5 VDC 
  19. 19. Ethernet Camera – Axis M1011 or 206 Streaming video for drivetime control has been challenging  Connects to RJ45 on cRIO  Can be used to track colors and shapes 
  20. 20. Jaguar Motor Controller Grey (old) and Black – they are different  CAN bus interface, current limit features  Do NOT remove the power screws  They are “swaged” on the end, which is meant to keep them from coming out  Removing them drops metal shavings into the guts 
  21. 21. Jaguar Motor Controller Black units have conformal coating to minimize damage if screws are removed  Have integral PID speed control, provided you hook up encoders  PWM or CAN interface  Direct connect to wheel encoders  You may get vouchers for controllers so you can choose 
  22. 22. Talon Motor Controller Simple controller, but very robust  PWM interface only  Brake and coast jumper  Fan optional 
  23. 23. Victor Motor Controller Also simple and robust  Newest model is 888. 884 also usable.  PWM interface only  Brake and coast jumper  No PID closed-loop control 
  24. 24. Spike “H-Bridge” Relay operation  On-Off-Reverse  Connects to “relay” output of digital sidecar, not PWM  Use for on-off motor control, compressor 
  25. 25. Operator Interface Classmate Computer or equivalent  Must run correct version of supplied software – CHECK UPDATES!  IP connected  Communicates constantly with cRIO  USB expansion hub  Joysticks (USB)  Cypress pSOC I/O expansion device  Many teams use their own computers 
  26. 26. Operator Interface Typically a 48” x 8” console  Joysticks or other driving interface  Buttons, switches, dials, lights  Your team designs and builds it  Effective driving operation is enabled by careful ergonomic design, especially when it comes to controlling the nondrive functions 
  27. 27. Operator Interface Cypress board provides 16 configurable digital pins, 8 analog inputs  Plug into proto board, or build/buy carrier board  Digital and analog functions map to software 
  28. 28. Typical OI Functions switch (on/off) – 1 digital input  3 position switch (on/off/on) – 2 digital inputs  Potentiometer (variable position) – 1 analog input  Push button switch (momentary contact) – 1 digital input  Indication (LED) – 1 digital output 
  29. 29. Link between OI and cRIO Default software causes cRIO and classmate computer to update each other several times a second  All OI data is fed to cRIO automatically  If they don’t talk, your robot disables itself  Status of communication shown in classmate GUI 
  30. 30. Other Handy Parts      10-turn potentiometers  Not supplied – Norvac, Fry’s, Digi-Key  Wire to analog input US Digital Quadrature Encoders  Mount in many transmissions  Count transmission rotation, direction  Can interface directly with Jaguars 3-axis accelerometer (supplied) Gyro (supplied) Analog Ultrasonic detectors  For measuring close distances
  31. 31. Sources for parts      Digikey and Mouser (web ordering, fast shipping, good prices) Fry’s and Oregon Electronics (more expensive, but stock on shelf. Limited assortment) US Digital (quadrature encoders) Sparkfun electronics (sensors, arduinos) Pololu robotics (sensors, arduinos)
  32. 32. Helpful Hints
  33. 33. Working the Wago • Find a Wago tool, or make one. Most screwdrivers cause damage • Take care to insert directly at a fixed angle, pressing straight in • Do not pry. The goal is to open the spring by pressing in the screwdriver, not by prying Yes ! NO ! End View
  34. 34. 802.11 Radio Link Only the DAP-1522 Rev B is acceptable at events  Learn how to set static IP addresses on your PC, and how to log into AP and adapter to configure them manually  Turn off “Wireless Protection”, so that inadvertent presses of external buttons don’t change settings unexpectedly  At competitions, must put switch in “bridge” 
  35. 35. Bridge Placement The DAP-1522 has antennas at either end  Uses both antennas for 802.11n MIMO  Mount it up away from robot frame, motors, cRIO  Don’t show up with a Rev-A model 
  36. 36. Hints Learned the Hard Way Solder your terminals – prevent failure  Keep large gauge wiring as short as possible  Lay your electronics out so you can troubleshoot it – 2 layers sometimes works  Make a battery charging record  ◦ During tournaments, know which one is charged Read the inspection rules early – a great “cheat sheet” for guiding you  Label your wires or use color markings, to make troubleshooting easier  Robot frame is NOT connected to ground 
  37. 37. Hints Learned the Hard Way       Use red wire for +, black wire for – Never lift a battery by the leads. Shut off the power before plugging or unplugging any thing! Cover electronics when doing metal work above – metal shavings will ruin your day Pay attention to wire gauge requirements All electrical failures are mechanical in nature …. Make your electrical connections so they will survive being whacked. - check before every round.
  38. 38. Hints Learned the Hard Way  Before bagging your robot….. Inspect it ◦ Get an experienced robot inspector to come to your location and go over it. ◦ Minimize the number of surprises you may experience at your first event ◦ If pre-inspection is allowed, take advantage of it  At the first competition … get out for a practice match ◦ This gives you a chance to confirm connecting to the field
  39. 39. Hints Learned the Hard Way  At the competition ◦ There is no power for your custom laptop at the driver station of the field. ◦ YOU MAY NOT PLUG YOUR DS LAPTOP IN AT THE FIELD – so keep your battery charged  Develop and use a checklist to use before each match ◦ Matches do not get re-run because your robot has a loose wire, dead battery, or wasn’t properly prepared
  40. 40. Wrapping Up  Go to the FIRST website ◦ FRC – Resources – Technical Resources
  41. 41. Wrapping Up Read last year’s Robot Rules Manual  Look at the schematics and technical information from last year – now!  Visit an experienced team for a day  Ask around  ◦ Tim Bennington-Davis  tbenningtondavis@ixiacom.com  (503) 449-9507

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