Postsecondary Students withDisabilities in STEM: DegreeChoices, Retention & Career OptionsMark Leddy, PhD, Program Directo...
National Science Foundation  NSF StrategicPerformance Goal“Prepare and engagea diverse STEMworkforce motivatedto participa...
National Science Foundation“The economic growth of our country requires a highly skilled  and diverse technical and scient...
National Science Foundation                                                                      Percent with             ...
National Science Foundation  Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA)      Amendments Act (ADAAA)                   (Public L...
National Science Foundation Types of Disabling Conditions• Attention Deficit Disorder• Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Dis...
National Science Foundation    Barriers to Student Success• Poor academic preparation• Negative faculty, family & peer  at...
National Science FoundationLost STEM Talent in High School• 100% of non-learning disabled high schoolstudents reach their ...
National Science Foundation  Lower Expectations for HighSchool Students to Attend College• By Teachers of Students with Le...
National Science FoundationAlliances for Students with Disabilities in STEM                   2001-2011       U of Washing...
National Science Foundation Alliance Practices Contributing to         College RetentionNagle, Marder & Schiller, 2009
National Science FoundationUniversity of Southern Maine’s EASTAlliance for Students with Disabilitiesin STEM• 50+ undergra...
National Science FoundationBuilding an Alliance for New Careers in STEM: A Collaborative Model for the Inclusion of Youth ...
National Science Foundation       AccessSTEM AllianceUniversity of Washington, 2005-2008HRD-0227995 (Burgstahler, 2008)
National Science Foundation
National Science FoundationBasics AboutDisabilities andScience andEngineeringEducationFree Download:www.lulu.com/sevoHRD-0...
Kansas NSF EPSCoR                                   Office                            Foley Hall                          ...
RDE Collaborative Dissemination     www.washington.edu/doit/RDE/(Funded by National Science Foundation Award 0929006)
National Science Foundation
National Science FoundationMechanism 1: NSF’s Merit Review CriteriaApplied Across the Foundation• What are the broader imp...
National Science FoundationMechanism 2: Facilitation Awards forScientists and Engineers with Disabilities(FASED)Consult th...
National Science FoundationMechanism 3: Specific NSF Programs  • General and Age Related Disabilities     Engineering Prog...
National Science Foundation
National Science FoundationMark Leddy, PhD, Program DirectorResearch in Disabilities EducationDirectorate for Education an...
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Mark Leddy - Postsecondary Students with Disabilities in STEM: Degree Choices, Retention & Career Options

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Presented by Mark Leddy at the 67th Annual Meeting of the ORAU Council of Sponsoring Institutions.
http://www.orau.org/council/

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Mark Leddy - Postsecondary Students with Disabilities in STEM: Degree Choices, Retention & Career Options

  1. 1. Postsecondary Students withDisabilities in STEM: DegreeChoices, Retention & Career OptionsMark Leddy, PhD, Program Director Research in Disabilities Education Directorate for Education and Human Resources National Science Foundation
  2. 2. National Science Foundation NSF StrategicPerformance Goal“Prepare and engagea diverse STEMworkforce motivatedto participate at thefrontiers.”(NSF 11-047)
  3. 3. National Science Foundation“The economic growth of our country requires a highly skilled and diverse technical and scientific workforce to advance innovation and competitiveness on a global scale.” Percent with Number with disabilities disabilities Population 21-64 17% 28,145,000 US workforce 21-64 10% 12,836,000 STEM workforce 6% 306,000 NSF Division of Science Resources Statistics SOURCES: Population and U.S. workforce—U.S. Census Bureau, Survey of Income and Program Participation, 2005; Workforce and doctoral faculty—National Science Foundation, SESTAT data system, and Survey of Doctorate Recipients, 2006.
  4. 4. National Science Foundation Percent with Number with disabilities disabilities Students 6-17 11% 5,538,900 STEM undergraduates ▼10% 461,710 STEM graduate students ▼ 7% 49,300 STEM doctorate recipients ▼ 1% 386 Population 21-64 17% 28,145,000 US workforce 21-64 10% 12,836,000 STEM workforce 6% 306,000 STEM doctoral faculty 7% 11,700NSF Division of Science Resources StatisticsSOURCES: Students 6-17—U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education Programs, 2008; Undergraduateand graduate students—U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, National PostsecondaryStudent Aid Study, 2008; STEM doctorate recipients, NSF/SRS, Survey of Earned Doctorates 2009, Workforce anddoctoral faculty—National Science Foundation, SESTAT data system, 2006, 2008.
  5. 5. National Science Foundation Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) Amendments Act (ADAAA) (Public Law 110-325)• Disability is a current or past physical or mental impairment, or “being regarded as having such an impairment,” that substantially limits a major life activity or a major bodily function of an individual.• Major life activities may include caring for oneself, learning, reading, concentrating, thinking, communicating and working
  6. 6. National Science Foundation Types of Disabling Conditions• Attention Deficit Disorder• Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder• Deaf or Hard-of-Hearing• Physical Disability/Mobility Impairment• Systemic Health Condition• Mental Health Condition• Learning Disability/Dyslexia• Blindness or Visual Impairment• Acquired Brain Injury• Autism or Aspergers Syndrome
  7. 7. National Science Foundation Barriers to Student Success• Poor academic preparation• Negative faculty, family & peer attitudes• Labs, classes & materials inaccessible• Limited campus services• Lack of financial support• Poor self-advocacy skills
  8. 8. National Science FoundationLost STEM Talent in High School• 100% of non-learning disabled high schoolstudents reach their potential in Algebra II.• 62% of students labeled with a learningdisability with the potential to completeAlgebra II by the end of high school do so.HRD-0834177; HRD-0965444 (Muller, Shifrer & Callahan , 2011)
  9. 9. National Science Foundation Lower Expectations for HighSchool Students to Attend College• By Teachers of Students with Learning Disabilities• By Parents of Students with Learning Disabilities• By Students with Learning Disabilities HRD-0834177; HRD-0965444 (Muller, Shifrer & Callahan , 2011)
  10. 10. National Science FoundationAlliances for Students with Disabilities in STEM 2001-2011 U of Washington RIT U of So. Maine U of Wisconsin City U of NY – Ohio St. U Hunter Col. Wright St. U U of MO Kansas City New Mexico St. U U of GA GA Tech Auburn U Tuskegee U Alabama St. U U of Hawaii
  11. 11. National Science Foundation Alliance Practices Contributing to College RetentionNagle, Marder & Schiller, 2009
  12. 12. National Science FoundationUniversity of Southern Maine’s EASTAlliance for Students with Disabilitiesin STEM• 50+ undergraduate research experiences on campus.• 33% of participants successfully transitioned to graduate school.• Research in labs and environmental science.HRD-0833567 (Langley-Turnbaugh, Whitney, 2010)
  13. 13. National Science FoundationBuilding an Alliance for New Careers in STEM: A Collaborative Model for the Inclusion of Youth and Veterans withDisabilities (University of Missouri-Kansas City) http://www.kcstemalliance.org/ HRD-0929212 (Jenson, Truman)
  14. 14. National Science Foundation AccessSTEM AllianceUniversity of Washington, 2005-2008HRD-0227995 (Burgstahler, 2008)
  15. 15. National Science Foundation
  16. 16. National Science FoundationBasics AboutDisabilities andScience andEngineeringEducationFree Download:www.lulu.com/sevoHRD-0622885 (Todd, Sevo, 2011
  17. 17. Kansas NSF EPSCoR Office Foley Hall 2021 Constant Ave. Lawrence, KS 66047 (785) 854-3096 nsfepscor@ku.eduwww.nsfepscor.ku.edu/publications.html(This report was prepared as account of work sponsored byNSF Award 0854967 and NIH’s NIGMS)
  18. 18. RDE Collaborative Dissemination www.washington.edu/doit/RDE/(Funded by National Science Foundation Award 0929006)
  19. 19. National Science Foundation
  20. 20. National Science FoundationMechanism 1: NSF’s Merit Review CriteriaApplied Across the Foundation• What are the broader impacts of theproposed activity • How well does the proposed activity broaden the participation of underrepresented groups (e.g., gender, ethnicity, disability, geographic, etc.)?
  21. 21. National Science FoundationMechanism 2: Facilitation Awards forScientists and Engineers with Disabilities(FASED)Consult the NSF Grant Proposal Guide
  22. 22. National Science FoundationMechanism 3: Specific NSF Programs • General and Age Related Disabilities Engineering Program (GARDE) www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp? pims_id=501021 • Research in Disabilities Education Program (RDE) www.nsf.gov/funding/pgm_summ.jsp? pims_id=5482
  23. 23. National Science Foundation
  24. 24. National Science FoundationMark Leddy, PhD, Program DirectorResearch in Disabilities EducationDirectorate for Education and Human ResourcesNational Science FoundationPhone: 703-292-4655Fax: 703-292-9018mleddy@nsf.govwww.nsf.gov

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