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Report Writing - Findings section
Report Writing - Findings section
Report Writing - Findings section
Report Writing - Findings section
Report Writing - Findings section
Report Writing - Findings section
Report Writing - Findings section
Report Writing - Findings section
Report Writing - Findings section
Report Writing - Findings section
Report Writing - Findings section
Report Writing - Findings section
Report Writing - Findings section
Report Writing - Findings section
Report Writing - Findings section
Report Writing - Findings section
Report Writing - Findings section
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Report Writing - Findings section

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Step-by-step guide on how to write the Findings section of a report.

Step-by-step guide on how to write the Findings section of a report.

Published in: Economy & Finance, Business
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  • 1. © 2013 Sherrie Lee http://www.linkedin.com/in/orangecanton REPORT WRITING Writing and Presentation Skills
  • 2. Findings
  • 3. FINDINGS  Respondents’ Profile   Highlights significant results, e.g. gender, age, frequency Scope items    Each aspect of the problem or investigation should highlight significant results Data should be analysed / interpreted Visuals may be used for more significant results and should be clearly labelled
  • 4. FINDINGS  How to analyse data   Compare   Describe Evaluate Format of Findings section
  • 5. FINDINGS  Respondent’s Profile: Gender, Age 200 working adults were surveyed. 53% of respondents were aged 30 – 45 years old while the rest were aged 18 – 29 years old. Almost half (48%) of the respondents were women.
  • 6. FINDINGS  Describe: Convert data into percentages (up to one decimal point) Example You issued questionnaires to 200 working adults. 93 adults said they were most unhappy because they did not save as much as they should. 1. 93 out of 200 = 46.5% 2. 46.5% of respondents said they were most unhappy because they did not save as much as they should.
  • 7. 46.5%
  • 8. FINDINGS  Compare: Look for relationships among the data Example You issued questionnaires to 200 working adults. 93 adults said they were most unhappy because they did not have much savings. 54 said they were worried about the economy, 46 said they were dissatisfied with their jobs, and 42 said they did not have work-life balance. 12 said they were unhappy with the government. 1. 93 = 46.5%; 54 = 27%; 46 = 23%; 42 = 21% 2. Respondents were asked to choose reasons for their unhappiness. The majority of respondents (46.5%) said they were most unhappy because they did not save as much as they should. 27% of them said they were unhappy because they were worried about the economy, 23% were dissatisfied with their jobs, 21% said did not have work-life balance. A minority (6%) said they were unhappy with the government.
  • 9. 46.5% 23% 27% 21% 6%
  • 10. FINDINGS  Compare: Use connectives Most of the respondents (46.5%) said they were most unhappy because they did not save as much as they should. Also, 27% of them said they were most unhappy because they were worried about the economy, 23% were dissatisfied with their jobs, while 21% said did not have work-life balance. In addition, a minority (6%) said they were most unhappy because of the government.
  • 11. FINDINGS  Evaluate: What is the significance of the data? Most of the respondents (46.5%) said they were unhappy because they did not save as much as they should. Also, 27% of them said they were unhappy because they were worried about the economy, 23% were dissatisfied with their jobs, while 21% said did not have work-life balance. In addition, a minority (6%) said they were unhappy with the government. Thus, the main causes of unhappiness among Singaporeans are insufficient savings, current state of the economy and job dissatisfaction.
  • 12. FINDINGS  Format of Findings section Example 2. Findings 1.4 Scope 2.1 Respondents’ profile Besides respondents’profile, the report looks into three 2.2 Insufficient savings possible reasons for unhappiness among 2.3 Economy Singaporeans: insufficient savings, the economy and job 2.4. Job dissatisfaction dissatisfaction.
  • 13. FINDINGS Example Can you write out one sub-section of the findings based on the data? You issued questionnaires to 200 working adults. 12 respondents said they were unhappy with the government. 42 respondents said they did not have work-life balance. 43 respondents spent more than $500 on groceries each month. 46 respondents said they were dissatisfied with their jobs 54 respondents said they were worried about the economy. 65 respondents spent more than 40% of their salary on loan repayments. 81 respondents spent more than they earned each month on credit cards. 93 respondents said they did not have much savings. Insufficient savings
  • 14. 2. Findings [taking 200 as base] 2.2 Insufficient savings The majority of respondents (46.5%) said they were most unhappy because of insufficient savings. 40.5% of the respondents said they spent more than they earned each month on credit cards, 32.5% spent more than forty percent of their salary on loan repayments, while 21.5% spent more than $500 on groceries each month. This suggests that the use of credit cards and the high cost of living are major contributors to the lack of savings among Singaporeans.
  • 15. 2. Findings [taking 93 as base] 2.2 Insufficient savings The majority of respondents (46.5%) said they were most unhappy because of insufficient savings. Of these, 87% said they spent more than they earned each month on credit cards, 69.9% spent more than forty percent of their salary on loan repayments, while 46.2% spent more than $500 on groceries each month. This suggests that the use of credit cards and the high cost of living are major contributors to the lack of savings among Singaporeans.
  • 16. Numbered headings 2. Findings 2.2 Insufficient savings Use 2.2 (because 2.1 is Respondents’ Profile The majority of respondents (46.5%) said they were most unhappy because of insufficient savings. Of these, 87% said that spent more than they earned each month on credit cards, 69.9% spent more than 40% of their salary on loan repayments, while 46.2% spent more than $500 on groceries each month. This suggests that the use of credit cards and the high cost of living are major contributors to the lack of savings among Singaporeans.

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