Leveraging the ROMAN II Asset Management System

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Western Australia is currently rolling out a replacement system for the management of road assets, known as ROMAN II. The package includes RAMM, the software used throughout New Zealand to manage road assets; dTIMS, the internationally renowned predictive modelling tool; as well as a full support and training arrangement. It will replace the previous ROMAN pavement management system used by the majority of WA Local Governments.
There are many different ways to view and manipulate the information stored within the ROMAN II system. This paper will briefly review the ROMAN II system, the implementation phase of the project and then present several case studies that demonstrate the potential of the system for housing a wide range of asset information, such as inventory, condition and risk ratings.
Further ways to maximise the potential of the system and how it could, and should, fit into the wider asset management picture of local government will be a key theme of the paper and ROMAN II’s place in the asset management cycle will be examined. This also includes looking at ways to make the best use of ROMAN II for the benefit of stakeholders (levels of service, etc) and to meet the organisation’s asset management goals.

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  • INTRODUCTIONAs Shrek once said, “Ogres are like onions. Onions have layers. Ogres have layers. Get it? We both have layers!”
  • The beast that is asset management also has layers...During this session we will get to the heart of the matter by stripping back a few of these layers and examining a few ideas on how they all fit together.The presentation will focus on WA’s new road asset management system called ROMAN II, but many of the concepts relate to asset management systems in general.
  • So, What is ROMAN II? ROMAN II is the new road asset management system for Local Government in Western Australia It replaces the old ROMAN system that has done a great job over the years, but was starting to get a bit tired and outdated The ROMAN II project was initiated by the Western Australian Local Government Association, with support from Main Roads WA and the IPWEA Opus have been working with WALGA since 2006 to provide impartial advice and project management services through the investigation, procurement, negotiation and development phases of the project prior to the commencement of rollout ROMAN II is made up of 2 core commercial “off-the-shelf” software packages: RAMM + dTIMS, + full user training and support provided by ARRB Group RAMM, which stands for Road Assessment and Maintenance Management, is a package that has been used by road controlling authorities in New Zealand to manage their road assets for over 25 years This includes both Local Governments and the NZ Transport Agency who control the State Highway networkdTIMS stands for Deighton Total Infrastructure Management System. Using deterioration models, dTIMS allows you to predict the future condition of your assets and generate optimised strategies. dTIMS is used all over the world; 40% of US states are using Deighton software and it is widely used in NZ to model the performance of road networks ROMAN II has now been adopted by over 130 of the 141 Local Governments in Western Australia
  • The rollout of ROMAN II began following the conditional acceptance of the product in May 2011 This involved retrieving the previous ROMAN databases from each Local Government subscriber and translating them to a new RAMM database At the same time a report was produced which showed possible data errors in the existing ROMAN data The software is provided through the internet and is hosted on a server in Perth – this means that access can be gained from anywhere Initial training has now been delivered to over 30 different groups of users all over WA – from Broome in the north, to Albany in the south and even the outlying Cocos Islands The training covered some very basic requirements, such as viewing and summarising data using some of the variety of different methods available in RAMM. It also covered basic updating and reporting
  • One of the keys to asset management is making informed decisions, as it is with many other everyday areas of life Just like driving to another part of town – when you are driving down the freeway you really want to know:What your destination is;What direction you are heading; andWhat the best route is.Destination can be defined by your organisation’s AM policyDirection is set through an AM strategyThe best route to take, or the processes used to manage the assets, can be documented and developed through the AMP processAn Asset Management Policy: Outlines a local government’s asset management objectives, targets and plans. Establishes a platform for service delivery. Provides the framework that enables the Asset Management Strategy and Plans to be produced. Supports a ‘whole of life’ and ‘whole of organisation’ approach to asset management.An Asset Management Strategy outlines how the local government’s asset portfolio will: Meet the service delivery needs of its communities into the future; Enable their Asset Management Policy to be achieved; and Ensure that asset management is established as part of the local government’s plan for the future.Asset Management Plans define current levels of service and the processes local governments use to manage each of their asset classes.
  • Having a robust asset management system such as ROMAN II means there is a real chance to leverage off of it to better inform Local Government decisions It’s important to differentiate between Problem Analysis and Decision Making Problem analysis is about analysing performance, deviations from performance and establishing those as potential problems However, Decision making is when you take the information from your problem analysis, use it to develop objectives and actions, and subsequently make decisionsSo ROMAN II won’t make your decisions for you but it will help you analyse performance, identify problems and allow that information to be used by Local Government managers and CouncillorsBUT, to be able to measure and analyse the right areas and therefore inform the “right debate”, we need to ensure that we are holding useful information rather than massive amounts of meaningless data A system like ROMAN II, that is now a common system for almost all of WA, allows structured reporting that is consistent, repeatable, long-term and meaningful – benchmarking Another advantage is that there were NO massive upfront costs to individual Local Governments – which means they can focus on other areas like using their data in their AM processes
  • One of the advantages of using a commercially available system such as ROMAN II, is the wide variety of data viewing options The main RAMM application includes a grid view or a detailed view. These are 2 simple ways to view a number of different assets or to focus on one asset in more detail. For example, a user can look at a grid of all the signs on a particular road, on a selection of roads or by applying a filter on any number of fields There is a third option which is a spatial view using the mapping module – this option allows users to display assets on a map INSERT MAP EXAMPLE COOROW – slide on and then slide off Data such as condition, replacement value, material or age can be easily summarised across sections of road using standard features or by writing custom SQL scripts
  • One of the advantages of using a commercially available system such as ROMAN II, is the wide variety of data viewing options The main RAMM application includes a grid view or a detailed view. These are 2 simple ways to view a number of different assets or to focus on one asset in more detail. For example, a user can look at a grid of all the signs on a particular road, on a selection of roads or by applying a filter on any number of fields There is a third option which is a spatial view using the mapping module – this option allows users to display assets on a map INSERT MAP EXAMPLE COOROW – slide on and then slide off Data such as condition, replacement value, material or age can be easily summarised across sections of road using standard features or by writing custom SQL scripts
  • One of the advantages of using a commercially available system such as ROMAN II, is the wide variety of data viewing options The main RAMM application includes a grid view or a detailed view. These are 2 simple ways to view a number of different assets or to focus on one asset in more detail. For example, a user can look at a grid of all the signs on a particular road, on a selection of roads or by applying a filter on any number of fields There is a third option which is a spatial view using the mapping module – this option allows users to display assets on a map INSERT MAP EXAMPLE COOROW – slide on and then slide off Data such as condition, replacement value, material or age can be easily summarised across sections of road using standard features or by writing custom SQL scripts
  • There are many features available in ROMAN II that haven’t previously been commonly available to Local Government in Western Australia.
  • There is a greater opportunity to store more information about a wider range of assets. Specifically, users are able to store not just detailed inventory and condition information about their pavements, but they can also store risk and valuation data. The same data can be stored for a wide range of assets found within the road corridor, including bridges, retaining walls and street lights. There are also numerous ways to save time on loading data that weren’t available in the old ROMAN package. This includes bulk loading of data and updates using SQL scripts. However, I believe the real key to maximising the potential of the system is going to be how organisation’s use their data and turn it into useful information! I’m also going to run through 3 case studies that are possibly a little bit different to each other, BUT all of them demonstrate a risk-based approach.
  • The first example I’m going to share demonstrates the use of street light asset data to determine areas of a road network where lighting was inadequate This was possible because of the extent of data that can be stored about street lights in RAMM
  • The data structure employed by RAMM is based on 3 core components of a pole, a bracket and a light Each pole has a unique ID, a location, purpose, owner, material and dimensions Each bracket is connected to a pole and has a unique ID, type, outreach distance, angle, etc Each light is then connected to a bracket and also has a unique ID, manufacturer, gear type, lamp, etc Using this information it was possible to determine and plot the theoretical illuminance, measured in lux, using GIS software
  • As you can see the illuminance across a section of road can be presented quite clearly This enables sections of road that are not adequately lit to be identified
  • A second example of the innovative use of road asset data is the development of a programme of sites for the collection of falling weight deflectometer data This data is commonly used to calculate the strength of pavements, which is an important input into pavement performance models, such as the one available for use in dTIMS as part of ROMAN II
  • It can often be tough working out where to start when you have data to collect so let’s take a look at just one methodology of selecting sites to capture falling weight deflectometer information on The charts shown present the basis of this methodology which can be employed to define useful samples of sites Using pavement age and traffic loading data you can divide a road network up into separate bins. Specifically, if you know the age of the pavement and how much traffic passes over it you can work out the cumulative ESA (or equivalent standard axles) that the section of pavement has experienced By applying weightings to the percentage of sites that have no strength data, in the bins shown in the first chart, you can select bins to target You can then prioritise the sites to focus your testing on The second chart shows the spread of testing across the different bins PRINT more detailed notes in case of questions...
  • Nope, that’s not Tasmania... In fact the region we are looking at is the former Franklin District in New Zealand. A significant portion of this region is now part of the Auckland super city. The map shows the geology of the District and highlights some of the roads where the pavement strength number is low With this sort of information it is also possible to make some assumptions about the strength of pavements you have less mechanical data for, by linking geological data with the other pavement information you hold As alluded to, strength information is an important input into pavement performance modelling so it should be a key focus for Local Government organisations wishing to make use of the powerful dTIMS tool
  • The third case study we will look at highlights the burgeoning importance of asset data as an input into road safety initiatives
  • In 2005 a team of researchers and statisticians, including Peter Cenek of Opus, described a method of combining detailed information on road geometry, surface condition, and road characteristics, with crash data. Their study was made possible due to the geometry and surface condition data that had been collected on NZ State Highways and stored in RAMM since 1997 The statistical analysis was used to develop a crash prediction model that could be used to predict the expected number of crashes per year on sections of road
  • Karangahake Gorge is an 18km stretch of road through torturous terrain in the North Island of New Zealand The crash prediction model was used to analyse possible intervention treatments to determine their likely effect on crash reduction Some of the treatments were: curve realignment, surface treatments to improve skid resistance and surface treatments to improve ride quality The results of the study were that a number of treatments were carried out in the Gorge, and a reduction in crashes was observed The study won a Silver Award of Excellence at the 2009 Association of Consulting Engineers New Zealand annual Innovate NZ Awards
  • Asset data and information systems are an important part of the total asset management processIt is impossible to implement worthwhile AM solutions without adequate knowledge of your assets and their performance
  • Understanding the total AM process is important becausethe use of advanced tools to predict asset renewal is not ideal when AM is immature, data is scarce and LoS are not fully developed.Tools should support the process so we will take a brief look at how AM systems such as ROMAN II can assist.
  • Asset Management is not a pyramid scheme!! In fact, where pyramid schemes are non-sustainable business models that promise the world; Asset Management is the opposite and drives sustainability and sound investment in the delivery of services The diagram shown represents the International Infrastructure Management Manual’s depiction of a top-down or bottom-up approach to asset management ROMAN II provides the tools to suit any of the approaches that your organisation has taken
  • ROMAN II is easily capable of being used to meet the requirements of Core Asset Management as defined in the IIMM.The RAMM software component allows users to populate the minimum required data fields about their assets or to populate a vast array of detail
  • Knowing the condition of assets is important to their ongoing management and provides an important input into the development of forward works programmes Pavement condition data stored in RAMM is available for use in the ROMAN II Works Selection Tool This tool can be used to optimise decisions about the sections of road where treatments are to be performed Users are able to run scripts to produce scenarios using different triggers and prioritise works programmes within defined budgets
  • The basic premise of advanced asset management, as defined in the IIMM, is that it includes all the elements of core asset management; BUT, it also includes the long term, whole of life, optimisation of Cost, Risk, and Performance.
  • This is where dTIMS comes into it’s own!dTIMS is a very powerful tool, and it can be used to predict future condition and model performance under existing conditions It can also optimise multiple strategies and objectives across your network of assets When set up properly and used to it’s potential dTIMS can: improve your return on investment; improve your decision making; and lower the total cost of asset ownership By running different scenarios of performance measures it is possible to work towards determining affordable levels of service
  • Levelsof Service are often not seen as a priority for development. However, they are crucial to all other parts of Asset Management and achieving quality outcomes.
  • Let’s take a brief look at how ROMAN II can assist with Levels of Service... One of the keys to developing Levels of Service is ensuring they meet the S.M.A.R.T. criteria, being Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant and Timebound Obviously, the major contribution that ROMAN II can provide is measurable information on your road assets
  • ROMAN II can give you information on: ownership condition performance – such as the life that surfaces are achieving utilisation – for example, traffic data As well as failure modes, treatment ranking and works optimisation through the Works Selection and dTIMS tools. All of this information can be used to aid in determining the current service level being provided to customers
  • As described earlier, tools like dTIMS are powerful enough to help with optimising service delivery, and determining affordable service levels But, it’s all a bit of a balancing act in order to deliver what customers want, at a cost that customers are willing to pay So it’s not just a matter of generating an answer from a software tool. Yes, ROMAN II can help you solve problems. But, it can’t make decisions for you.
  • ...And it can’t help you understand your customers!!
  • So just to summarise: I introduced the ROMAN II package Talked about informed decision making Gave you some examples of how to maximise the potential of ROMAN II Looked at it’s place in the total asset management process, and How it can help with measuring levels of service.
  • Leveraging the ROMAN II Asset Management System

    1. 1. LEVERAGING THE ROMAN II ASSET MANAGEMENT SYSTEM<br />Damien Douglas BE(Civil) MIEAust<br />Opus International Consultants<br />
    2. 2. LEVERAGING THE ROMAN II ASSET MANAGEMENT SYSTEM<br />
    3. 3. LEVERAGING THE ROMAN II ASSET MANAGEMENT SYSTEM<br />Western Australia’s road asset management system<br />WALGA / Main Roads / IPWEA<br />Adopted by over 130 LGs<br />Opus provided project management to WALGA<br />
    4. 4. LEVERAGING THE ROMAN II ASSET MANAGEMENT SYSTEM<br />The Rollout So Far<br />Commenced in May 2011<br />Translated ROMAN databases to ROMAN II<br />Perth-based hosting service<br />RAMM 101 training to approx 30 groups<br />Basics: viewing/summarising, updating, reporting<br />
    5. 5. LEVERAGING THE ROMAN II <br />ASSET MANAGEMENT SYSTEM<br />Informed Decision Making<br />
    6. 6. LEVERAGING THE ROMAN II ASSET MANAGEMENT SYSTEM<br />Informed Decision Making<br />Better inform Asset Management decision making<br />Data rich vs information rich<br />Powerful common system for road assets<br />LGs didn’t have to commit resources to development<br />
    7. 7. LEVERAGING THE ROMAN II ASSET MANAGEMENT SYSTEM<br />Data Views and Manipulation<br />Adaptability of data – manipulation<br />Grid view / detailed view / spatial view<br />Filters / SQL<br />Summarise data to inform AM processes<br />e.g. condition, value, material, age, planned work, etc<br />
    8. 8. LEVERAGING THE ROMAN II ASSET MANAGEMENT SYSTEM<br />
    9. 9. LEVERAGING THE ROMAN II ASSET MANAGEMENT SYSTEM<br />Data Views and Manipulation<br />Adaptability of data – manipulation<br />Grid view / detailed view / spatial view<br />Filters / SQL<br />Summarise data to inform AM processes<br />e.g. condition, value, material, age, planned work, etc<br />
    10. 10. LEVERAGING THE ROMAN II <br />ASSET MANAGEMENT SYSTEM<br />Maximise Potential<br />
    11. 11. LEVERAGING THE ROMAN II ASSET MANAGEMENT SYSTEM<br />Maximise Potential<br />Store more than before<br />Wider range of assets<br />Save time – bulk load / SQL<br />Don’t just populate – use it<br />Examples demonstrating potential<br />
    12. 12. CASE STUDY:<br />Street Lights<br />
    13. 13. CASE STUDY: Street Lights<br />Pole<br />Bracket<br />Light<br />
    14. 14. CASE STUDY: Street Lights<br />
    15. 15. CASE STUDY:<br />Pavement Strength Analysis<br />
    16. 16. CASE STUDY: Pavement Strength Analysis<br />
    17. 17. CASE STUDY: Pavement Strength Analysis<br />
    18. 18. CASE STUDY:<br />Road Safety Initiatives<br />
    19. 19. Statistical modelling: <br />Road Characteristics vs Crash Rates<br />Road geometry – curvature, gradient, crossfall<br />Surface condition – roughness, rutting texture<br />Characteristics – region, urban/rural, traffic<br />CASE STUDY: Road Safety Initiatives<br />
    20. 20. Karangahake Gorge (Paeroa to Waihi, NZ)<br />Analysed using crash <br /> prediction model<br />Interventions effect on <br /> predicted crash rate<br />Silver Award of Excellence <br /> (ACENZ 2009) <br />CASE STUDY: Road Safety Initiatives<br />
    21. 21. LEVERAGING THE ROMAN II <br />ASSET MANAGEMENT SYSTEM<br />The Asset Management Cycle<br />
    22. 22. The Total Asset Management Process<br />Continual Improvement Through Monitoring/Review<br />Source: IIMM (2006)<br />
    23. 23. Core & Advanced Asset Management<br />Source: IIMM (2006)<br />
    24. 24. Core Asset Management:<br />Identify critical assets<br />Asset register<br />Condition/performance data<br />Optimised decision making<br />Levels of service (based on historical info)<br />Core & Advanced Asset Management<br />
    25. 25. Work Selection Tool:<br />Core & Advanced Asset Management<br />
    26. 26. Advanced Asset Management:<br />Long term whole of life optimisation of:<br />Cost<br />Risk<br />Performance<br />Core & Advanced Asset Management<br />
    27. 27. Optimisation using dTIMS:<br />Predict future condition<br />Multi-year project analysis<br />Multi-objective optimisation<br />Multiple engineering strategies<br />Determine affordable Levels of Service<br />Core & Advanced Asset Management<br />
    28. 28. LEVERAGING THE ROMAN II <br />ASSET MANAGEMENT SYSTEM<br />Levels of Service<br />
    29. 29. How Can ROMAN II Help?<br />S.M.A.R.T.<br />Levels of Service<br /><ul><li>Specific
    30. 30. Measurable
    31. 31. Achievable
    32. 32. Relevant
    33. 33. Timebound</li></li></ul><li>How Can ROMAN II Help?<br />What is the current service level?<br />Levels of Service<br /><ul><li>Asset ownership
    34. 34. Physical condition
    35. 35. Performance
    36. 36. Utilisation
    37. 37. Failure modes
    38. 38. Treatment rankings
    39. 39. Works rationalisation
    40. 40. Works optimisation</li></li></ul><li>How Can ROMAN II Help?<br />Cost of Service vs Level of Service<br />Balancing these out <br />Levels of Service<br />
    41. 41. ROMAN II can’t help you understand your customers!<br />Levels of Service<br />
    42. 42. Summary:<br />Introducedthe ROMAN II package<br />Informed decision making<br />Examples of how to maximise potential<br />Place in the Total Asset Management Process<br />Measuring levels of service<br />LEVERAGING THE ROMAN II ASSET MANAGEMENT SYSTEM<br />
    43. 43. LEVERAGING THE ROMAN II ASSET MANAGEMENT SYSTEM<br />Damien Douglas BE(Civil) MIEAust<br />Opus International Consultants<br />QUESTIONS?<br />www.opus.com.au/pe/roman2<br />www.twitter.com/opusroman2<br />

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