Designing For Online
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  • 21st Century Learning and Sharing Conference April 2010. M. Brewer
  • 21st Century Learning and Sharing Conference April 2010. M. Brewer
  • 21st Century Learning and Sharing Conference April 2010. M. Brewer
  • 21st Century Learning and Sharing Conference April 2010. M. Brewer
  • 21st Century Learning and Sharing Conference April 2010. M. Brewer
  • 21st Century Learning and Sharing Conference April 2010. M. Brewer
  • 21st Century Learning and Sharing Conference April 2010. M. Brewer
  • 21st Century Learning and Sharing Conference April 2010. M. Brewer
  • 21st Century Learning and Sharing Conference April 2010. M. Brewer
  • 21st Century Learning and Sharing Conference April 2010. M. Brewer
  • 21st Century Learning and Sharing Conference April 2010. M. Brewer
  • 21st Century Learning and Sharing Conference April 2010. M. Brewer
  • 21st Century Learning and Sharing Conference April 2010. M. Brewer
  • 21st Century Learning and Sharing Conference April 2010. M. Brewer
  • 21st Century Learning and Sharing Conference April 2010. M. Brewer
  • 21st Century Learning and Sharing Conference April 2010. M. Brewer
  • 21st Century Learning and Sharing Conference April 2010. M. Brewer
  • 21st Century Learning and Sharing Conference April 2010. M. Brewer
  • 21st Century Learning and Sharing Conference April 2010. M. Brewer
  • 21st Century Learning and Sharing Conference April 2010. M. Brewer
  • 21st Century Learning and Sharing Conference April 2010. M. Brewer
  • 21st Century Learning and Sharing Conference April 2010. M. Brewer
  • 21st Century Learning and Sharing Conference April 2010. M. Brewer
  • 21st Century Learning and Sharing Conference April 2010. M. Brewer
  • 21st Century Learning and Sharing Conference April 2010. M. Brewer
  • 21st Century Learning and Sharing Conference April 2010. M. Brewer
  • 21st Century Learning and Sharing Conference April 2010. M. Brewer
  • 21st Century Learning and Sharing Conference April 2010. M. Brewer
  • 21st Century Learning and Sharing Conference April 2010. M. Brewer
  • 21st Century Learning and Sharing Conference April 2010. M. Brewer
  • 21st Century Learning and Sharing Conference April 2010. M. Brewer
  • 21st Century Learning and Sharing Conference April 2010. M. Brewer
  • 21st Century Learning and Sharing Conference April 2010. M. Brewer
  • 21st Century Learning and Sharing Conference April 2010. M. Brewer
  • 21st Century Learning and Sharing Conference April 2010. M. Brewer
  • 21st Century Learning and Sharing Conference April 2010. M. Brewer

Designing For Online Designing For Online Presentation Transcript

  • Designing for Online: Instructional Design in Action! 21 st Century Learning and Sharing April 23th 2009 Monique Brewer Open School BC
  • Designing for Online Challenges & Successes What’s been your experience?
  • So, what the heck is instructional design anyway?
    • A systematic process of developing effective instructional materials.
    What is Instructional Design (ID)? Outcomes Assessment Media/Tech Learners Strategies
  • Instructional Design as a Process Planning & Design Production & Outputs Development Summative Evaluation Needs Assessment Pilot Stage Review & Sign-off Learners Create a Project Team Instructional Design Plan Products Review & Sign-off Review & Sign-off Review & Sign-off
  • The Role of the Instructional Designer
    • May vary from organization to organization
    • A combined role of Project Manager and Instructional Designer
    • Main purpose is to be “an advocate for the learner”
    • Consider the learner’s needs throughout the whole development process
    • Ensure learning outcomes are met, activities are appropriate, use of technology and media is appropriate etc.
    onal Instructional Design Applicable to Different Settings… Online: Grade 4 F2F: In the classroom Principles the Same
  • Why Use Instructional Design?
    • Promotes accountability, quality, and educational integrity
    • Provides opportunities for learners to succeed
    • Ensures courses address the prescribed learning outcomes /competencies
    • Systematically consider all of the variables involved in designing content
    • So, we don’t waste money & time…
  • Don’t try to build the bathroom before the house! Why use Instructional Design?
  • Best Practice #1: Create an ID Plan
    • Plan should address:
    • Learner Analysis
    • Learning outcomes
    • Content design
    • Appropriate activities and assessments
    • What’s going work going to work for online? Technology & media.
  • Module Example: Open School BC Course
  • Best Practice #2: Analyze Your Learners
    • Interests
    • Abilities
    • Knowledge
    • Technology
    • Environment
  • Best Practice #3: Get the Mix Right
    • E-Learning isn’t necessarily the “magic bullet” that guarantees a rich learning environment
    • Need the right blend:
    • synchronous and asynchronous interaction
    • group and self-paced/independent learning
    • print and online resources
    • learning activities appropriate to student needs, and technical capacity
    • The bulk of the content presented in Study Guide formats.
    • Textbook as a resource
    • Web as a wrap around to provide interaction:
    • student: student
    • student: instructor
    Print Based with Online as a Wrap Around
  • A Mixed Model - Deep Blending Classroom Time Video conferencing or use tools such as Elluminate Online Print - Study Guide/textbooks, other resources
  • Self-Paced Online
  • Best Practice #4: Use Learning Outcomes
    • Learning outcomes help to:
      • Clarify your ideas
      • Provide a scope & sequence to what you want to design
      • Can help students know what to expect
      • Guides assessment
      • Serve as building blocks for developing courses = house analogy.
  • Best Practice #3: Determine Pedagogy
      • Behaviorism:
        • Mind as a “black box”
        • Promotes “lower level learning such as “observe” or “memorize”
      • Cognitive:
        • Looks at what happens in the learner’s mind
        • Input (information) is processed and stored in memory and output is learned capability
      • Constructivism
        • Learning is constructed from knowledge Problem-based learning, multiple representations, reflective
  • Best Practice #4: Sequence Content
    • By topic
    • Chronologically
    • By place
    • By cause and effect
    • By structural logic
    • Problem-centred
    • Spiral
    • A loose network
  • Best Practice #5: Pace Your Course
    • Pacing will help your students complete their course
    • Real time interactions with their instructors/teachers through audio or video conferencing or Face-to-Face - tools like Elluminate.
    • Discussions online are carried out over one week time frame.
    • Assignments and exams are completed by given date
    • Cohort vs self paced courses.
  • Best Practice #6: Design Engaging Activities
    • Frequency of activities
      • Get the learners to do something throughout the learning process and not just at the end
    • Consider variations of activities:
      • Reflect on a reading or their own experience,
      • Analyze a video clip, audio segment
      • Engage in a discussion or an interview
      • Keep a diary or log of a project
      • Move from simple to complex; easy to challenging
  • Activities & Retention
    • Average Retention Rate:
    • Lecture 5 %
    • Reading 10 %
    • Audio-Visual 20 %
    • Demonstration 30 %
    • Discussion Group 50 %
    • Practice by Doing 75 %
    • Immediate Use of Learning 90 %
  • Simulations
  • Best Practice #7: Build Appropriate Assessment
    • Different types - formative and summative
    • Link to learning outcomes
    • Authentic, valid, and reliable
    • Simple to complex; rote to critical thinking; objective to subjective
    • Provide immediate feedback
    • Consider balance of both student and teacher workload
  •  
  •  
  • Best Practice #8: Use Appropriate Media
    • Types of media
      • graphic, audio, video, interactive
    • Considerations
      • Purpose
      • Cost
      • Availability
  • Graphics
    • Explain the Function:
      • Refer to a graphic within your text & explain the purpose
    • Design Activities Around a Graphic:
      • If a graphic is core to a concept, design an activity around
    • Placement of Graphics within Text:
      • as close as possible to the piece of text that refers to it.
    • Emphasize the Graphic:
      • Learners will benefit from a graphic if they can easily see what point you are trying to make
  • Pacific Garbage Patch: students.umf.maine.edu/kanedc/public.www/
  • Audio
    • Foreign language dialogues
    • Spoken glossaries of “hard to pronounce terms”
    • Conversations to be analyzed
    • Discussions or interviews
    • Sounds (i.e., heart’s rhythm after a drug has been absorbed; animals)
    • Presentations
    • Consider using a still image
  • Video
    • Be sure motion is really essential in what you want to show your learners.
    • Use existing material rather than make your own.
    • Can be very expensive to do well.
    • Streaming video clips: 2-3 minutes long.
    • Avoid duplicating traditional lecture format unnecessarily.
  •  
    • Multimedia
      • Effective instruction across learning domains, including affective and psychomotor (e.g., simulations, case studies)
      • Promote development of higher-order thinking skills, and concept formation
      • Realism, especially when coupled with graphics and video
      • Potential interactivity
      • Potential for high levels of learner control and engagement
    Interactive Media
  •  
  • Best Practice # 9: Write for Online
    • Write to reading level of student
    • Use familiar words (arrival not influx)
    • Use short words (basic not fundamental)
    • Use short sentences and paragraphs
    • Use positive instead of negative
    • Remove unnecessary words and phrases
    • Use conversational style of language
        • Write in a friendly personal style directed to the student (“You will recall …”).
    • Use examples where possible.
  • Best Practice #10: Design for the Screen
    • A web page should contain a single coherent piece of learning
    • A screen is not a page
    • Do not merely convert existing print course to Web
    • Chunk information
    • Communicate more in graphics
    • Consider the use of white space
    • Use suitable fonts
  • Thank You!
    • Monique Brewer
    • Manager, Instructional Services
    • Open School BC
    • [email_address]
    • (250) 952-6021
    • www. openschool .bc.ca