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Agile Research for Open Education Researchers
Agile Research for Open Education Researchers
Agile Research for Open Education Researchers
Agile Research for Open Education Researchers
Agile Research for Open Education Researchers
Agile Research for Open Education Researchers
Agile Research for Open Education Researchers
Agile Research for Open Education Researchers
Agile Research for Open Education Researchers
Agile Research for Open Education Researchers
Agile Research for Open Education Researchers
Agile Research for Open Education Researchers
Agile Research for Open Education Researchers
Agile Research for Open Education Researchers
Agile Research for Open Education Researchers
Agile Research for Open Education Researchers
Agile Research for Open Education Researchers
Agile Research for Open Education Researchers
Agile Research for Open Education Researchers
Agile Research for Open Education Researchers
Agile Research for Open Education Researchers
Agile Research for Open Education Researchers
Agile Research for Open Education Researchers
Agile Research for Open Education Researchers
Agile Research for Open Education Researchers
Agile Research for Open Education Researchers
Agile Research for Open Education Researchers
Agile Research for Open Education Researchers
Agile Research for Open Education Researchers
Agile Research for Open Education Researchers
Agile Research for Open Education Researchers
Agile Research for Open Education Researchers
Agile Research for Open Education Researchers
Agile Research for Open Education Researchers
Agile Research for Open Education Researchers
Agile Research for Open Education Researchers
Agile Research for Open Education Researchers
Agile Research for Open Education Researchers
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Agile Research for Open Education Researchers

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Taking lessons from Agile Programming/eXtreme Programming into how we do research. From deliverables and meetings to sprints and scrums. …

Taking lessons from Agile Programming/eXtreme Programming into how we do research. From deliverables and meetings to sprints and scrums.

Based on version presented at Open University CALRG conference 11 June 2013.

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Published in: Education, Technology
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  • Study the interesting things that happen: For researchers we need to spot the interesting and unpredictable in the unexpected actions of individuals as well as considering the mass actions at scale. Spotting the interesting behaviours of “lead users (Von Hippel, 2005) can help identify emergent ideas.Look for patterns that can apply more widely: Draw out patterns looking for shared characteristics and be open to signs of clustering behaviour by examining individual cases and see trends that can benefit others.Encourage all to be part of the experiment: Extending an invitation to all involved, end-users and producers, helps to maximise the value in experiments and bring out routes to extra information.Build valuable activities that give data: Activities that provide authentic outputs, especially if they are digital, mean that there is less need to request data solely for research purposes. For example, reflective logs help the learner but can also provide insight to the researcher and badges (Knight & Casilli, 2012) that encourage progress can also help track the overall performance of learners.Recognise openness has a lot of benefits: Openness encourages transfer between systems, provides the chance for early discussion, and expands dissemination.Draw conclusions though you wish you had more data: No computer system is ever completely finished or perfect, rather it is always a beta release that can be refined. Similarly no research project ever has all the data and can be sure of the results, but to be of value indicative results need to be available in early forms. This challenges the peer review process.Be prepared for the user that arrives anywhere: In researching openness it is important to recognise the reduced control inherent in the design. Data gathering that depends on users reading advice or passing through other points (e.g. logins) will not work in all circumstances.Realise there is no way to control all access: Openness allows transfer so it is likely that at some point there will be activity that we know nothing about. As researchers we must therefore operate with incomplete data, and partial knowledge in particular where information can travel from site to site. Table 1: Principles for Research 2.0 (modified from (McAndrew et al., 2009))
  • Study the interesting things that happen: For researchers we need to spot the interesting and unpredictable in the unexpected actions of individuals as well as considering the mass actions at scale. Spotting the interesting behaviours of “lead users (Von Hippel, 2005) can help identify emergent ideas.Look for patterns that can apply more widely: Draw out patterns looking for shared characteristics and be open to signs of clustering behaviour by examining individual cases and see trends that can benefit others.Encourage all to be part of the experiment: Extending an invitation to all involved, end-users and producers, helps to maximise the value in experiments and bring out routes to extra information.Build valuable activities that give data: Activities that provide authentic outputs, especially if they are digital, mean that there is less need to request data solely for research purposes. For example, reflective logs help the learner but can also provide insight to the researcher and badges (Knight & Casilli, 2012) that encourage progress can also help track the overall performance of learners.Recognise openness has a lot of benefits: Openness encourages transfer between systems, provides the chance for early discussion, and expands dissemination.Draw conclusions though you wish you had more data: No computer system is ever completely finished or perfect, rather it is always a beta release that can be refined. Similarly no research project ever has all the data and can be sure of the results, but to be of value indicative results need to be available in early forms. This challenges the peer review process.Be prepared for the user that arrives anywhere: In researching openness it is important to recognise the reduced control inherent in the design. Data gathering that depends on users reading advice or passing through other points (e.g. logins) will not work in all circumstances.Realise there is no way to control all access: Openness allows transfer so it is likely that at some point there will be activity that we know nothing about. As researchers we must therefore operate with incomplete data, and partial knowledge in particular where information can travel from site to site. Table 1: Principles for Research 2.0 (modified from (McAndrew et al., 2009))
  • IET has specialist role in Accessibility. Module H810: Accessible Online Learning. Research – long history. Work on Standards, Personalisation.Practical support to improve accessibility – including specialist testing facilities.
  • Transcript

    • 1. www.open.ac.ukProfessor Patrick McAndrewInstitute of Educational TechnologyThe Open University@openpadBecoming more agileresearchers:Experiences fromresearching Open EducationResources
    • 2. Openness06/17/10
    • 3. Opening upThe Open Universitys Institute ofEducational Technology
    • 4. Opening upThe Open Universitys Institute ofEducational Technology
    • 5. Opening upThe Open Universitys Institute ofEducational Technology
    • 6. MOOC06/17/10
    • 7. 06/17/10MOOC (Today)
    • 8. Open Research06/17/10
    • 9. Shared knowledgePeer researchers IndividualResearch teamPeer approvalScientific behaviourStudiesDesk researchResearch instrumentsResearcherCommunity Division of labourRulesSubject ObjectToolsImpactPolicy makersFundersPracticitioners
    • 10. Research 2.0βeta (Based on O’Reilly Web 2.0)1. Study the interesting things that happen2. Look for patterns that can apply more widely3. Encourage all to be part of the experiment4. Build valuable activities that give data5. Recognise openness has a lot of benefits6. Draw conclusions while wanting more data7. Be prepared for the user that arrives anywhere8. Realise there is no way to control all accessMcAndrew, P., Godwin, S., & Santos, A. (2009). Research 2.0: How do we know aboutthe users that do not tell us anything? http://oro.open.ac.uk/23854/
    • 11. Research 2.0βeta (Based on O’Reilly Web 2.0)1. Study the interesting things that happen2. Look for patterns that can apply more widely3. Encourage all to be part of the experiment4. Build valuable activities that give data5. Recognise openness has a lot of benefits6. Draw conclusions while wanting more data7. Be prepared for the user that arrives anywhere8. Realise there is no way to control all accessMcAndrew, P., Godwin, S., & Santos, A. (2009). Research 2.0: How do we know aboutthe users that do not tell us anything? http://oro.open.ac.uk/23854/
    • 12. The Open Universitys Institute ofEducational Technology
    • 13. 06/17/10
    • 14. 06/17/10a. Use of OER leads to improvement in student performance and satisfaction.b. The open aspect of OER creates different usage and adoption patterns thanother online resourcesc. Open education models lead to more equitable access to education, serving abroader base of learners than traditional education.d. Use of OER is an effective method for improving retention for at-risk students.e. Use of OER leads to critical reflection by educators, with evidence ofimprovement in their practicef. OER adoption at an institutional level leads to financial benefits for studentsand/or institutions.g. Informal learners use a variety of indicators when selecting OER.h. Informal learners adopt a variety of techniques to compensate for the lack offormal support, which can be supported in open courses.i. Open education acts as a bridge to formal education, and iscomplementary, not competitive, with it.j. Participation in OER pilots and programs leads to policy change at institutionallevel.k. Informal means of assessment are motivators to learning with OER
    • 15. Working with…•Open Courseware Library•CCCOER•+++•School of Open•Bridge to Success•+++•Flipped classroom•Gulf of Maine Institute•+++• Connexions/Open University• TESS India• +++HigherEducationSchools (K-12)CommunityCollegesInformallearning17
    • 16. 06/17/10
    • 17. Agile Research
    • 18. Agile Research
    • 19. Agile Research
    • 20. Agile Development/(eXtreme Programming)Product BacklogSprintsScrumsTimeboxBurndownVelocity
    • 21. 06/17/10Task size bingoSprint velocityProduct visionSprint reviewDaily scrumSprint backlogAgile in actionThanks to FutureLearnprogramming team May 2013
    • 22. Becoming agile• Sprinting towards year 1• Scrumming together• Tracking our velocity• Flexing as we reflect
    • 23. Deliverable -> Sprint backlog06/17/10
    • 24. 06/17/10
    • 25. Meeting -> Scrum06/17/10
    • 26. 06/17/10
    • 27. 06/17/10
    • 28. 06/17/10
    • 29. Deadline -> Velocity06/17/10
    • 30. 06/17/10
    • 31. 06/17/10
    • 32. 06/17/10Questions
    • 33. Patrick McAndrewInstitute of Educational Technologywww.open.ac.uk/iet@openpadPatrick.McAndrew@open.ac.uk

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