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Find, Use, Remix, and Create Open Learning Materials
 

Find, Use, Remix, and Create Open Learning Materials

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In this workshop, members of the Open.Michigan initiative will teach ...

In this workshop, members of the Open.Michigan initiative will teach
you how to find openly licensed content and show you how to remix it
to create new open educational resources (OER). Included will be an
overview of copyright law and we will discuss how this applies to the
creation and use of OER. Examples of OER use and reuse will illustrate
how these resources can have an impact on local and international
learning communities and how they have been used in specific contexts.
Participants will also get a chance to generate examples of OER and
learn how these resources can be accessed and adapted online. Please
bring your laptop and some of your own learning materials or resources
to this workshop and we will help you make it open on the spot.
Examples of OER can be found at: http://ur1.ca/2lhe9 and
http://ur1.ca/2lhei and http://ur1.ca/2lhij

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  • Thanks to those of you who came to the Enriching Scholarship talk this morning. A couple of you asked about our standard disclaimer slide, attribution key, and examples of the various attribution formats. Here is the template that we normally use when training student volunteers who assist us and their faculty members with converting instructional materials into OER: https://open.umich.edu/wiki/images/b/b6/Disclaimer_Citation_Key.ppt
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  • Welcome to our presentation How to “Find, Use, Remix, and Create Open Learning Materials.”
  • Here’s a quick look at some of the things my colleague and I are going to cover today. We’re going to start out by defining OER and showing you some examples. Then we’re going to talk about the Open.Michigan initiative, which supports the production and publication of OER on our campus. Then we’re going to switch to a more demonstration mode so you can get some hands on experience finding, using, and creating your own OER. learn what steps are involved in creating and sharing your own educational materials as OER. So that’s our general plan for today.
  • So, let’s start out with a definition. OER are Open Educational Resources, also known as “Openly Licensed Educational Materials”
  • You’ll be hearing the term “openly licensed” a lot in this presentation
  • as in the OER definition from wikipedia.
  • The key point here is that OER goes beyond just sharing materials. By openly licensing these materials it enables others to remix, repurpose, improve, and redistribute educational materials.
  • It is sometimes easiest to understand OER by comparing it to Open Course Ware.
  • Are you familiar with MIT Open Course Ware? Launched in 2001. MIT OCW is a large-scale, Web-based publication of MIT’s educational materials representing 33 academic disciplines and all five of MIT’s schools. Their collection now includes 1950 published courses.
  • So, OCW is generally packaged and presented as a course. OER can be a course, or can also be just a presentation or a paper or a bibliography or a website or an image collection. OER is any resource that is related to learning and has been openly licensed for others to share.
  • Another way to look at how the two relate is to think of OCW as a subset of OER Again, what that means is OER can include complete courses (including Open Course Ware) or it can be individual educational resources or content -- such as images, data, learning modules, or even software
  • OK, so what are some of the benefits of OER?
  • Launched in 2005, Open.Michigan started as a result of a collaboration between a few faculty, a few administrators, and a few students. After MIT received a round of funding from the Hewlett and Mellon foundations to launch their OpenCourseWare (OCW) initiative, collaborators at U-M (faculty, admins) started talking about how to do open courseware here. Some wanted to use the MIT model and get a bunch of funding, others were left wondering if there might be a completely different model, given the size of the curriculum and the associated cost. School of Information Associate Professor Joseph Hardin and worked with a number of graduate students to explore different models for clearing and publishing course materials.
  • The Open.Michigan website is the front door to U-M’s Open.Michigan initiative and provides information about a wide variety of open activities at U-M and beyond. Web address: http://open.umich.edu When you click on “Find”…
  • You’ll come to our Educational Resources page, which is the front door for the OER component of the Open.Michigan initiative. (https://open.umich.edu/education/ ) If you look in the left column, you’ll see all the departments that currently publish content on Open.Michigan Engineering LSA Public Policy Dentistry Education Information Medicine Nursing Public Health Architecture Social Work U-M Flint
  • Basically anything created by faculty, staff, or students can become OER.
  • OERs can be a complete course… Professor Paul Conway won a 2011 Provost’s Teaching Innovation Prize for SI 410 Ethics and Information Technology. SI 410 is one of 5 courses belonging to Prof. Conway that we have publishing on Open.Michigan, with 2 more coming. Prof. Conway wants all his courses published on Open.Michigan by June 1 as part of his tenure review packet.
  • Or just a lecture… like today’s presentation, which we’ll post on Slideshare
  • Or a video Last summer we interviewed Paul Courant Dean of Libraries at U-M about the benefits of open. We’ll play that video for you now, which also appears on our website. Point out the high number of views on the microbiology animations from Cary Engleberg
  • or a website. As I mentioned the example of a faculty member publishing his courses as OER as part of his tenure review, we are also approached by retiring faculty who want to publish their legacy materials as OER (such as this example from Prof. Lesley Rex in the English department).
  • or an image collection
  • or an instructional module (Note that MedEdPortal allows CC licenses to be added to their submissions, these licenses enable us to pull content from MedEdPortal and publish it in our collection.)
  • or even a textbook Example #1 Chemical Engineering Open wiki Textbook by Peter Woolf This project is a collaboration between the faculty and students of the University of Michigan chemical engineering department. It is a student-contributed open-source text covering the materials used at Michigan in a senior level course. The goal of this project is to provide the greater chemical engineering community with a useful, relevant, high quality, and free resource describing chemical process control and modeling. Initial construction of this resource began in Fall 2006. Example #2 High Performance Computing Open Textbook by Charles Severance High Performance Computing, originally published by O’Reilly–but out of print since 2003, has been republished on Connexions. Book author Charles Severance, with his editor Mike Loukides, worked with O’Reilly to release the book under a CC-BY license, then coordinated with the Connexions staff to republish it. The book is now freely available on the web and in PDF. Printed copies are available on-demand for the cost of printing and shipping. The CC-BY license also makes it possible for the entire contents of the book to be remixed and republished by anyone. (Note that Merlot allows CC licenses to be added to their submissions, these licenses enable us to pull content from Merlot and publish it in our collection.)
  • A student peer-reviewed scholarly journal like this example from the School of Social Work. A student handbook for traveling and doing research abroad, created with the support of the Center for Global Health, which is coupled with an interactive Google site that features discussion groups, an events calendar, and other resources.
  • Or a blog posting.
  • We monitor feedback from our users.
  • We also use Google Analytics to track usage statistics.
  • Selecting a license and displaying it on your work is the first step in creating OER.
  • When creating new learning materials… Start now by making a small change in how you create your own content.
  • 01/26/10 01/26/10
  • 01/26/10 01/26/10
  • Welcome to our presentation How to “Find, Use, Remix, and Create Open Learning Materials.”
  • You can find many collections of open content online ready for reuse, including images, artwork, audio, video, and course materials (including complete courses). Our wiki has a collection of links to help you get started.
  • Go to Flickr and click on “Advanced Search”
  • When creating new learning materials… Start now by making a small change in how you create your own content.

Find, Use, Remix, and Create Open Learning Materials Find, Use, Remix, and Create Open Learning Materials Presentation Transcript

  • Find, Use, Remix, and Create Open Learning Materials Enriching Scholarship, 6 May 2011 Susan Topol, Kathleen Ludewig Omollo Image from opensourceway ( flickr ) under a Creative Commons BY-SA license Copyright © 2011 The Regents of the University of Michigan Except where otherwise noted, this work is available under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
  • logistics please sign in location for bathrooms and water & fountain slides available at http://tinyurl.com/es-openmichigan
    • what is OER?
    • why OER?
    • open.michigan
    • generate OER
        • use
        • remix
        • create
    • group activity: find
  •  
  • “ Openly Licensed?” comes from the definition...
  • OER Definition : “ Open educational resources are educational materials and resources offered freely and openly for anyone to use and − under some licenses − to remix, improve and redistribute.” Wikipedia: OER, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_educational_resources
  • OER Definition : “ Open educational resources are educational materials and resources offered freely and openly for anyone to use and under some licenses to remix, improve and redistribute. ” Wikipedia: OER, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_educational_resources
  • What types of materials can become OER ?
    • Classroom Materials: including lecture presentations, reading lists, syllabi, etc.
    • Websites
    • Videos
    • Image Collections
    • Software
    • Textbooks
    • Blog postings
  • The difference between: Open Course Ware (OCW) and OER .
  • MIT OpenCourseWare, http://ocw.mit.edu/
  • OCW focuses on sharing open content that is developed specifically to instruct a course OER includes any educational content that is shared under an open license, whether or not it is a part of a course
  • OCW // OER - overlap OER OCW OCW, single images, general campus lectures, image collections, singular learning modules, paper or article syllabi, lecture notes, presentation slides, assignments, lecture videos - all related to a course
  • More about licenses later... Open Licenses make it all possible.
    • what is OER?
    • why OER?
    • open.michigan
    • generate OER
        • use
        • remix
        • create
    • group activity: find
  • benefits of OER: for faculty
  • benefits of OER: for faculty recognition for their teaching publish and promote their resources connect with other collaborators extend their reach and visibility
  • benefits of OER: faculty perspective from University Ghana (UG) The U-M Medical and Dental schools collaborate with several African universities for health OER
  • faculty perspective from UG In their own words: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p_U9zyMZnpY (2 min)
    • what is OER?
    • why OER?
    • open.michigan
    • generate OER
        • use
        • remix
        • create
    • group activity: find
  • Our mission is to help faculty, students, and staff maximize the impact of their creative and academic work by making it open and accessible to the public.
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  • What does OER look like?
  •  
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  • http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XtUsffmHH0o
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  • “ Thanks! This may well help me to pass my tests tomorrow!  ” “ Thanks, this is a better explanation.. my teacher's powerpoint is not  so good  . ” “ This is great stuff - and a good break from just reading my book . ”
  • Open.Michigan Usage Stats for One Month: (12/4/10 – 1/3/11) 77% New Visitors 24% Return Visitors 4574 Total visits 129 Countries (US, China, India, UK, Canada are top 5)
  • So, what makes these OER ?
  •  
  • So, how do I create OER ?
    • what is OER?
    • why OER?
    • open.michigan
    • generate OER
        • use
        • remix
        • create
    • group activity: find
  • It's easiest to create open content from the start.
  • Start now by making a small change in how you create your own content.
    • what is OER?
    • why OER?
    • open.michigan
    • generate OER
        • use
        • remix
        • create
    • group activity: find
  • Pop quiz
  • True or False: In order for an object to qualify for copyright protection, it must be marked with a (C) symbol False. See: The Berne Convention Implementation Act of 1988 (BCIA).
  • True or false: A work must be published and registered in order to be granted copyright protection. False.
  • End pop quiz
  • “ Open Licenses”
  • OER *mostly* uses Creative Commons Licenses
  • Creative Commons
  •  
  • OER Creative Commons: licenses
  • OER Creative Commons: licenses X X
  • Some rights reserved: a spectrum for OER least restrictive most restrictive Public Domain All Rights Reserved X X X
  • What does this mean for you?
  • Find, Use, Remix, and Create Open Learning Materials Enriching Scholarship, 6 May 2011 Susan Topol, Kathleen Ludewig Omollo Image from opensourceway ( flickr ) under a Creative Commons BY-SA license Copyright © 2011 The Regents of the University of Michigan Except where otherwise noted, this work is available under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
  • When possible, use only: Openly Licensed (or Public Domain ) Content
  • Where to find openly licensed or public domain media: http: //open.umich.edu/share/use.php
  • http://tinyurl.com/healthoerrequest An option for finding health OER
    • what is OER?
    • why OER?
    • open.michigan
    • generate OER
        • use
        • remix
        • create
    • group activity: find
  • BY: betsyjean79 ( flickr ) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/ Hmm…
  • add some extra information in the attribution: : author name : link to content : license name : link to license https://open.umich.edu/share/cite.php
  • BY: betsyjean79 ( flickr ) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/ On Slide
  • OER Let’s do it right from the start. CC: BY-SA Phil McElhinney ( flickr ) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ On Slide
  • Lady Finger Learning about Orchids phalaenopsis CC:BY audreyjm529 (flickr) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ Phalaenopsis Lady Finger Orchid CC:BY aussiegall (flickr) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ A Phalaenopsis hybrid A Phalaenopsis hybrid CC:BY-SA Zizonus (flickr) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ On Slide
  • Additional Source Information Slide 3: Janeway. Immunobiology : The Immune System in Health and Disease. Current Biology Ltd./Garland Publishing, Inc. 1997 Slide 4: Spinach is Good” Center for Disease Control; Life Magazine. January 17, 1938; rejon, http://openclipart.org/media/files/rejon/11221 Slide 5: Goody Two Shoes - McLoughlin Bro's (New-York) 1888 Slide 6: Jot Powers, “Bounty Hunter”, Wikimedia Commons, http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Bounty_hunter_2.JPG , CC: BY-SA 2.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ EXAMPLE At the end of the presentation
    • what is OER?
    • why OER?
    • open.michigan
    • generate OER
        • use
        • remix
        • create
    • group activity: find
  • what if you want to make your *existing* work available as OER?
  • what types of third-party (i.e. created by someone other than you) objects might you have in your content?
  • what should you do with them?
  • possible actions :: retain : keep the content because it is licensed under an Open license or is in the public domain :: replace : you may want to replace content that is not Openly licensed (and thus not shareable) :: remove : you may need to remove content due to privacy, endorsement or copyright concerns
  •  
    • what is OER?
    • why OER?
    • open.michigan
    • generate OER
        • use
        • remix
        • create
    • group activity: find
  • Open Attribute: Creative Commons Attributions made easy
  •  
  • Install Open Attribute http://openattribute.com/
  • HTML version <span about=&quot;http://www.flickr.com/photos/essjay/255444384/&quot; xmlns:dct=&quot;http://purl.org/dc/terms/&quot; xmlns:cc=&quot;http://creativecommons.org/ns#&quot;><a href=&quot;http://www.flickr.com/photos/essjay/255444384/&quot; property=&quot;dct:title&quot;>New Zealand, Clouds - 6.10pm</a> / <a rel=&quot;cc:attributionURL&quot; property=&quot;cc:attributionName&quot; href=&quot;http://www.flickr.com/photos/essjay/&quot;>Sarah Macmillan</a> / <a rel=&quot;license&quot; href=&quot;http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/&quot;>http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/</a></span>
  • Plain text version New Zealand, Clouds - 6.10pm (http://www.flickr.com/photos/essjay/255444384/) / Sarah Macmillan (http://www.flickr.com/photos/essjay/) / CC BY-NC-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/)
  • Are you looking for open content for a particular topic? If so, what topic? What types of materials are you seeking (e.g. images, videos, presentation slides, case studies)?
  • Here’s what you asked for: “ I am frequently looking for images to use in my presentations.  I know how to use the Creative Commons search engine, but I never seem to find images that really work.  Blogs that I read frequently use great images that have creative commons license, but I can never really seem to find what I'm looking for.” “ I’m a GSI for an interdisciplinary intro level science course. I'd like to be able to make our lab intros a little more exciting. So, w here I can find open learning materials on intro astronomy, geology, evolution, ecology and ecosystem ?
  •  
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  • https://open.umich.edu/wiki/Open_Content_Search Lots more Open Content on our Wiki!!
  • Back to your Requests… Astronomy (from Wikibooks): http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/General_Astronomy/Comets Geology (from MIT OpenCourseware): http://ocw.mit.edu/courses/earth-atmospheric-and-planetary-sciences/12-001-introduction-to-geology-spring-2008/index.htm Forestry (found by searching Directory of Open Access Journals http://www.doaj.org/ ): http://www.mdpi.com/journal/forests/ Evolution (from WikiMedia Commons): http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Category:Human_evolution
  • closing remarks
  • It's easiest to create open content from the start.
  • By making a small change in how you create your own content…
  • … and licensing your creations as OER …
  • … you can gain recognition , publish and promote your research and teaching materials, connect with collaborators, and preserve and apply knowledge .
  • logistics please fill out online evaluations
  • Questions? open.michigan@umich.edu open.umich.edu
  • Find more material online at http://open.umich.edu/share/ http://open.umich.edu/wiki/ Many slides in this presentation were produced in collaboration with Garin Fons, Pieter Kleymeer, Kathleen Ludewig Omollo, Greg Grossmeier, Emily Puckett Rodgers, and Susan Topol.