GEMC-Proposal for Emergency Medical Services in Kumasi- for Residents
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

GEMC-Proposal for Emergency Medical Services in Kumasi- for Residents

  • 622 views
Uploaded on

This is a lecture by Peter Moyer from the Ghana Emergency Medicine Collaborative. To download the editable version (in PPT), to access additional learning modules, or to learn more about the......

This is a lecture by Peter Moyer from the Ghana Emergency Medicine Collaborative. To download the editable version (in PPT), to access additional learning modules, or to learn more about the project, see http://openmi.ch/em-gemc. Unless otherwise noted, this material is made available under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike-3.0 License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/.

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
622
On Slideshare
622
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Project:  Ghana  Emergency  Medicine  Collabora4ve     Document  Title:  Proposals  for  Emergency  Medical  Services  in  Kumasi     Author(s):  Peter  Moyer  (Boston  University),  MD  2011     License:  Unless  otherwise  noted,  this  material  is  made  available  under  the  terms  of   the  Crea9ve  Commons  A;ribu9on  Share  Alike-­‐3.0  License:     hIp://crea4vecommons.org/licenses/by-­‐sa/3.0/     We  have  reviewed  this  material  in  accordance  with  U.S.  Copyright  Law  and  have  tried  to  maximize  your  ability  to  use,   share,  and  adapt  it.  These  lectures  have  been  modified  in  the  process  of  making  a  publicly  shareable  version.  The  cita4on   key  on  the  following  slide  provides  informa4on  about  how  you  may  share  and  adapt  this  material.     Copyright  holders  of  content  included  in  this  material  should  contact  open.michigan@umich.edu  with  any  ques4ons,   correc4ons,  or  clarifica4on  regarding  the  use  of  content.     For  more  informa4on  about  how  to  cite  these  materials  visit  hIp://open.umich.edu/privacy-­‐and-­‐terms-­‐use.     Any  medical  informa9on  in  this  material  is  intended  to  inform  and  educate  and  is  not  a  tool  for  self-­‐diagnosis  or  a   replacement  for  medical  evalua4on,  advice,  diagnosis  or  treatment  by  a  healthcare  professional.  Please  speak  to  your   physician  if  you  have  ques4ons  about  your  medical  condi4on.     Viewer  discre9on  is  advised:  Some  medical  content  is  graphic  and  may  not  be  suitable  for  all  viewers.   1  
  • 2. A;ribu9on  Key     for  more  informa4on  see:  hIp://open.umich.edu/wiki/AIribu4onPolicy     Use  +  Share  +  Adapt     {  Content  the  copyright  holder,  author,  or  law  permits  you  to  use,  share  and  adapt.  }   Public  Domain  –  Government:  Works  that  are  produced  by  the  U.S.  Government.  (17  USC  §  105)   Public  Domain  –  Expired:  Works  that  are  no  longer  protected  due  to  an  expired  copyright  term.   Public  Domain  –  Self  Dedicated:  Works  that  a  copyright  holder  has  dedicated  to  the  public  domain.   Crea9ve  Commons  –  Zero  Waiver   Crea9ve  Commons  –  A;ribu9on  License     Crea9ve  Commons  –  A;ribu9on  Share  Alike  License   Crea9ve  Commons  –  A;ribu9on  Noncommercial  License   Crea9ve  Commons  –  A;ribu9on  Noncommercial  Share  Alike  License   GNU  –  Free  Documenta9on  License   Make  Your  Own  Assessment     {  Content  Open.Michigan  believes  can  be  used,  shared,  and  adapted  because  it  is  ineligible  for  copyright.  }   Public  Domain  –  Ineligible:  Works  that  are  ineligible  for  copyright  protec4on  in  the  U.S.  (17  USC  §  102(b))  *laws  in  your   jurisdic4on  may  differ   {  Content  Open.Michigan  has  used  under  a  Fair  Use  determina4on.  }   Fair  Use:  Use  of  works  that  is  determined  to  be  Fair  consistent  with  the  U.S.  Copyright  Act.  (17  USC  §  107)  *laws  in  your  jurisdic4on   may  differ   Our  determina4on  DOES  NOT  mean  that  all  uses  of  this  3rd-­‐party  content  are  Fair  Uses  and  we  DO  NOT  guarantee  that  your  use  of   the  content  is  Fair.   To  use  this  content  you  should  do  your  own  independent  analysis  to  determine  whether  or  not  your  use  will  be  Fair.     2  
  • 3. EMS  defini4on   •  Defini4on  -­‐  extension  of  con4nuum  of   emergency  care  into  pre-­‐hospital  se`ng:   home,  street,  work,  school     3  
  • 4. Treatment  Protocols   •  Should:                    -­‐    include  a  baseline  set  of  na4onal  protocols  &                              addi4onal  local  ones  as  dictated  by  local                          needs                                          -­‐    be  realis4c  in  terms  of  training  and                            equipment  and  interface  with                                                  hospital                    -­‐      be  a  consensus  product  with  mul4ple                                MD  specialty  (EM,  Peds,  OB,  Trauma)  input                                               4  
  • 5. Suggested  Treatment  Protocols-­‐ Kumasi                                        RTA s  –                        -­‐  rapid  response                                                      -­‐  accurate  hx                                                      -­‐  limited,  per4nent  px  exam  (VS s,O2  Sat,  GCS,  head/neck,  truncal                                                and  extremity  injuries)                                                                                          -­‐  limited  field  Rx-­‐airway  /breathing:  adjuncts,BVM,O2                                                                                          -­‐  circula4on:  Trendelenberg    for  shock,  direct  pressure  to  bleeding  site,                  bandaging,  tourniquets                                                    -­‐  splin4ng  of  neck  and  extremi4es  (ex:  Hare  trac4on  splint  for  fem  fx s)                                                                                          -­‐  head  eleva4on  for  isolated  head  trauma                -­‐  needle  decompression  for  suspected  tension  PTX                                                      -­‐  short  on  scene  4me:  goal  of  10  min                                                                                          -­‐  rapid  transport  to  hospital  with  call  ahead  on  radio/phone  if  significant                    trauma  (immediately  life  threatening  trauma  would  prompt  emergency                    medicine  to  call  to  trauma  service/theater  as  well)                                               5  
  • 6. Protocols  (contd)    Thermal  Burns  -­‐  H2O,  cool  compresses,  dry    sterile  dressings                      Acid  /Alkali  burns  -­‐  copious  irriga4on     6  
  • 7. Protocols  (cont.)          Chest  pain:  O2,  ASA                                        Acute  cardiogenic  pulmonary  edema:  O2,  nitro                  Shock:  Rx  -­‐  stop  external  bleeding,  O2,  posi4on            (Trendelenberg),  immobilize  femur  fx s                  Hypoglycemia:                            recogni4on  with  glucometer                            Rx-­‐oral  sugar,  IM  glucagon       7  
  • 8. Protocols  (contd)   •  OB  -­‐  deliveries   •  Asthma  -­‐  O2,  albuterol   •  Anaphylaxis  -­‐  O2,  IM  epinephrine  (Epipen)   8  
  • 9. Inter-­‐facility  transport   •  Probably  only  useful  place  for  IV s  and   advanced  airways  (like  LMA s)   9  
  • 10. What  I  would  not  concentrate  on   ini4ally       •  CPR  and  AED s   •  IV s  (at  least  within  the  city)   •  Advanced  airways   10  
  • 11. Training   •  Ini4al  curriculum  should:                                reflect  knowledge  &  skills  to  be  used                                be  problem  based                                include  simula4on                                include  MD  input  ,teaching  &  oversight          be  standardized  across  region  and,  if  possible,  na4on                                  exams/cer4fica4on  should  be  standardized  across          na4on     •     Con4nuing    educa4on  should:                                emphasize  field  problems          include  MD  led  case  review         11  
  • 12. Communica4ons   •  Universal  access:  193                                    Phone  assessment  should:                    follow  a  scripted  algorithm                                          address    and  call  back  #                                          nature  of  complaint                                            priority  dispatch  –  depending  on  nature  of                    complaint  may  get  no  ambulance  or  ambulance                  with  slow  response  or  one  with  rapid  response;                  may  get  fire  and/or  police  as  well  depending  on                  nature  of  call;  pre  arrival  instruc4ons  -­‐  burns,                      delivery,  etc     12  
  • 13. Disaster  Response   •  Consider  likely  scenarios  –  gas  explosion,  bus   accident,  flood   •  Plan  with  hospitals  &  other  agencies  –  police,  fire,     na4onal  disaster  agency,  public  works,  public   health          -­‐  wriIen  policies          -­‐  agreed  upon  chain  of  command          -­‐  stockpile  supplies   •  Common  means  of  communica4on   •  Mul4agency  and  hospital  drills     13  
  • 14. Communica4ons  in  disasters   •  EMS  control  center  can  serve  as  hub  of  communica4ons                  Should  have  redundant  systems  (e.g.  radio  and  phone)  and  priority  in  cell  phone               use                  What  is  nature  of  event?  #  of  vic4ms?  Where?  When?                  May  direct  pa4ents  to  different  facili4es                  Ex:  some  may  go  to  district  hospitals;  minor  cases  to  outlying  facili4es  by  bus                  Assess  need  for  addi4onal  resources  –  more  ambulances,  fire  police,  public  works,              public  health,  regional    disaster  aid,  na4onal  disaster  aid     •             For  big  enough  disaster  will  need  an  off  site  command  center  with   representa4ves    from  mul4ple  agencies  and  on  site  command  post  for  at  least  public   safety                                                                               14  
  • 15. Medical  Director   •  Prac4cing  MD  –  if  not  an  emergency  physician,  needs   to  work  closely  with  EM   •  Creates  protocols  –  in  concert  with  other  special4es;   ideally  as  part  of  regional  or  na4onal  group  of   counterparts    who  meet  as  a  standing  body   •  Oversees  training  –  both  ini4al  and  ongoing   •  Oversees  standardized  tes4ng  and  cer4fica4on   •  Provides  con4nuing  quality  improvement     •  Audits  scene  care   •  Par4cipates  in  disaster  planning  &  care   •  Champions  EMS     15  
  • 16. Public  educa4on     Call  193   Appropriate  use  of  EMS   Encourage  Helmets   Discourage  si`ng  over  edge  of  backs  of   trucks,  fire  safety  &  first  aid,  mosquito  ne`ng,   etc.   •  Train  taxis  in  basic  first  aid   •  •  •  •  16  
  • 17. Surveillance   •  EMS  may  be  first  to  detect  epidemic   •  EMS  may  have  best  record  of  disease/injury   prevalence  and  incidence       17