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Project: Ghana Emergency Medicine Collaborative
Document Title: Gastrointestinal Bleeding in the Pediatric Patient
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Gastrointes-nal	
  Bleeding	
  in	
  the	
  
Pediatric	
  Pa-ent	
  

Michele	
  M.	
  Carney,	
  M.D.	
  
Combined	
  EM	...
Objec-ve	
  
	
  
Review	
  the	
  causes	
  of	
  upper	
  and	
  lower	
  
gastrointes-nal	
  bleeding	
  in	
  the	
  p...
Introduc-on	
  
•  Bloody	
  emesis	
  or	
  bloody	
  stools	
  are	
  very	
  anxiety	
  
provoking	
  for	
  parents	
 ...
Upper	
  GI	
  bleed	
  
•  Bleeding	
  proximal	
  to	
  the	
  ligament	
  of	
  Treitz.	
  
–  Presents	
  with:	
  
• ...
Ligament	
  of	
  Treitz	
  

Source undetermined

7	
  
Lower	
  GI	
  bleed	
  
•  Bleeding	
  distal	
  to	
  the	
  ligament	
  of	
  Treitz	
  
–  Presents	
  with:	
  
•  He...
Is	
  it	
  really	
  blood?	
  
•  Hemoccult	
  kits	
  
–  Used	
  to	
  test	
  stool	
  for	
  blood.	
  
–  Employs	
...
Is	
  it	
  really	
  blood?	
  
–  Gastroccult	
  kits	
  	
  
•  Used	
  to	
  determine	
  if	
  blood	
  is	
  present...
Clinical	
  Evalua-on	
  
•  Hemodynamic	
  stability	
  
–  Vitals	
  

•  Tachycardia,	
  orthosta-c,	
  hypotensive..	
...
Causes:	
  Neonates	
  
Neonates	
  (less	
  than	
  1	
  month):	
  
–  Upper	
  
•  Hemorrhagic	
  disease	
  of	
  the	...
Case	
  #1	
  
•  5	
  day	
  old	
  ex)38	
  week	
  breasfed	
  neonate	
  with	
  
hematemesis.	
  	
  
Vitals:	
  	
  ...
Upper	
  GI	
  bleed:	
  not	
  sick	
  
•  Swallowed	
  maternal	
  blood	
  from	
  delivery	
  or	
  
breast	
  feeding...
Upper	
  or	
  Lower	
  GI	
  bleed	
  
•  If	
  the	
  baby	
  was	
  born	
  at	
  home	
  or	
  mom	
  refused	
  
Vita...
Upper	
  GI	
  bleed	
  
•  If	
  the	
  history	
  is	
  unclear	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  it	
  is	
  reasonable	
  to	
  
...
Case	
  #2	
  
•  5	
  day	
  old	
  ex)	
  36	
  week	
  neonate	
  presents	
  with	
  
bloody	
  stool.	
  
•  Vitals:	...
Source undetermined

18	
  
Necro-zing	
  enterocoli-s	
  (NEC)	
  
•  Overall	
  rate	
  of	
  NEC	
  in	
  full	
  term	
  infants	
  is	
  
approxi...
Necro-zing	
  enterocoli-s	
  (NEC)	
  
•  Most	
  common	
  acquired	
  gastrointes-nal	
  
disorder	
  
•  Small	
  (mos...
Necro-zing	
  enterocoli-s	
  (NEC)	
  
•  Cause	
  is	
  unknown	
  

–  Intes-nal	
  ischemia	
  	
  
–  Coloniza-on	
  ...
Necro-zing	
  enterocoli-s	
  (NEC)	
  
• 
• 
• 
• 
• 
• 

Bowel	
  rest	
  	
  
Nasogastric	
  tube	
  decompression	
  
...
Case	
  #3	
  
•  4	
  week	
  old	
  male	
  with	
  poor	
  feeding	
  today	
  
presented	
  with	
  black	
  stool	
  ...
Case	
  #3	
  

In	
  the	
  emergency	
  department,	
  pa-ent’s	
  vomit	
  
was	
  green	
  

24	
  
Malrota-on	
  with	
  volvulus	
  

25	
  
Source undetermined
Source undetermined

26	
  
Malrota-on	
  
•  14	
  year	
  old	
  	
  
boy	
  with	
  recurrent	
  
abdominal	
  pain	
  and	
  
bilious	
  emesis	
 ...
Malrota-on	
  
•  Incidence	
  of	
  malrota-on	
  is	
  1	
  in	
  500	
  live	
  births	
  
•  60%	
  of	
  volvulus	
  ...
Malrota-on	
  
•  Malrota-on	
  with	
  midgut	
  volvulus	
  is	
  the	
  most	
  
cri-cal	
  surgical	
  emergency	
  in...
Normal	
  
•  4th	
  and	
  5th	
  week	
  of	
  gesta-on	
  
–  Duodenal	
  intes-nal	
  loop	
  comes	
  out	
  and	
  t...
Malrota-on	
  
•  Duodenal	
  intes-nal	
  loop	
  comes	
  out	
  but	
  does	
  
not	
  rotate.	
  
•  Cecal	
  loop	
  ...
• 

	
  
Children	
  (>	
  1	
  month	
  to	
  2	
  years)	
  
	
  
Upper	
  
– 
– 
– 
– 

Esophagi-s/gastri-s	
  
Hypertr...
Upper	
  GI	
  bleed	
  
•  Significant	
  bleeding	
  regardless	
  of	
  the	
  cause	
  
requires	
  inves-ga-on	
  
–  ...
Upper	
  GI	
  bleed	
  
–  Octreo-de	
  for	
  esophageal	
  varices	
  *	
  

•  Portal	
  venous	
  inflow	
  and	
  int...
Upper	
  GI	
  bleed	
  
•  Resuscita-on	
  
–  If	
  hemodynamically	
  compromised	
  
•  Two	
  large	
  bore	
  IV	
  ...
Case	
  #4	
  
•  2	
  year	
  old	
  female	
  with	
  choking	
  episode,	
  now	
  
with	
  blood	
  streaked	
  vomitu...
Lower	
  GI	
  bleed	
  
• 
• 
• 
• 
• 
• 

Anal	
  fissure	
  
Gastroenteri-s	
  
Intussuscep-on	
  
Milk	
  protein	
  al...
Case	
  #5	
  
15	
  month	
  old	
  female	
  with	
  chief	
  complaint	
  of	
  
lethargy.	
  
	
  
Vital	
  Signs:	
  ...
Intussuscep-on	
  
•  Most	
  common	
  cause	
  of	
  bowel	
  obstruc-on	
  
ages	
  3	
  months	
  to	
  5	
  years	
  ...
Intussuscep-on:	
  Presenta-on	
  
•  Severe	
  colicky	
  pain,	
  legs	
  and	
  knees	
  flexed	
  
•  The	
  infant	
  ...
Intussuscep-on:	
  Pathophysiology	
  
•  Telescoping	
  of	
  ileum	
  into	
  colon	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  	
  ileum	
  
com...
Intussuscep-on:	
  Ultrasound	
  

Source undetermined

42	
  
Intussuscep-on	
  
•  Crescent	
  sign	
  LUQ	
  
•  Target	
  sign	
  RUQ	
  
•  Loss	
  of	
  hepa-c	
  outline	
  

Sou...
Intussuscep-on	
  
•  Study	
  in	
  South	
  Africa	
  showed	
  that	
  Burkiv	
  
lymphoma	
  presented	
  as	
  intuss...
Case	
  #	
  6	
  
•  A	
  six	
  week	
  old	
  formula	
  fed	
  infant	
  presents	
  with	
  
two	
  stools	
  with	
 ...
 
Cows	
  milk	
  protein	
  allergy	
  
	
  

•  Immunologic	
  hypersensi-vity	
  reac-on	
  to	
  milk	
  
proteins	
  ...
Management	
  
•  Removal	
  of	
  cow’s	
  milk	
  from	
  the	
  diet	
  
•  30%	
  also	
  allergic	
  to	
  soy	
  
• ...
Finish	
  Study	
  
The	
  study	
  involved	
  40	
  consecu-ve	
  infants	
  (mean	
  age:	
  2.7	
  months)	
  
with	
 ...
Case	
  #7	
  
11	
  year	
  old	
  male	
  with	
  lethargy	
  and	
  pale	
  
appearance.	
  
	
  
Vital	
  signs:	
  
T...
Case	
  #7	
  
•  Labs	
  revealed:	
  hemoglobin	
  level	
  of	
  4.8	
  g/dl,	
  
and	
  a	
  hematocrit	
  of	
  14.6%...
Meckel’s	
  Diver-culum	
  
Acid	
  secre-ng	
  mucosa	
  
2%	
  (of	
  the	
  popula-on)	
  
2	
  feet	
  (from	
  the	
 ...
Meckel’s	
  Diver-culum	
  
•  infants	
  and	
  preschool	
  children	
  
–  slight	
  or	
  massive	
  GI	
  bleeding	
 ...
GI	
  bleeding	
  in	
  Adolescents	
  
Upper	
  
•  Pep-c	
  ulcer/gastri-s	
  
•  Prolapse	
  (trauma-c)	
  gastropathy	...
Case	
  #	
  8	
  
•  2	
  year	
  old	
  male	
  with	
  history	
  of	
  asthma	
  has	
  ear	
  
pain	
  for	
  2	
  da...
Quiz	
  
•  2	
  year	
  old	
  boy	
  with	
  bilious	
  vomi-ng	
  and	
  
bloody	
  stools	
  since	
  last	
  night.	
...
• 
• 
• 
• 
• 

A.	
  Ultrasound	
  of	
  abdomen	
  
B.	
  Upper	
  GI	
  
C.	
  CT	
  of	
  the	
  abdomen	
  
D.	
  Mec...
•  12	
  year	
  old	
  boy	
  S/P	
  Kasai	
  for	
  biliary	
  atresia	
  
presents	
  with	
  pruri-s,	
  mild	
  icter...
• 
• 
• 
• 
• 

A.	
  Pep-c	
  Ulcer	
  disease	
  
B.	
  Esophageal	
  varices	
  
C.	
  Posterior	
  nasal	
  bleeding	
...
•  5	
  year	
  old	
  with	
  intermivent,	
  painless	
  bright	
  
red	
  blood	
  per	
  rectum	
  associated	
  with	...
• 
• 
• 
• 
• 

A.	
  Intussuscep-on	
  
B.	
  Juvenile	
  polyp	
  
C.	
  Meckel	
  diver-culum	
  
D.	
  Pep-c	
  Ulcer	...
•  5	
  year	
  old	
  girl	
  complains	
  of	
  severe	
  perianal	
  
pain	
  on	
  stooling.	
  	
  Physical	
  shows	...
• 
• 
• 
• 
• 

A.	
  Campylobacter	
  
B.	
  C.	
  Diff	
  
C.	
  Streptococcal	
  
D.	
  Salmonella	
  
E.	
  Shigella	
 ...
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GEMC - Gastrointestinal Bleeding in the Pediatric Patient

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This is a lecture from the Ghana Emergency Medicine Collaborative (GEMC). To download the editable version (in PPT), to access additional learning modules, or to learn more about the project, see http://openmi.ch/em-gemc. Unless otherwise noted, this material is made available under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike-3.0 License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/.

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Transcript of "GEMC - Gastrointestinal Bleeding in the Pediatric Patient"

  1. 1. Project: Ghana Emergency Medicine Collaborative Document Title: Gastrointestinal Bleeding in the Pediatric Patient Author(s): Michele Carney (University of Michigan), M.D., 2011 License: Unless otherwise noted, this material is made available under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Share Alike-3.0 License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ We have reviewed this material in accordance with U.S. Copyright Law and have tried to maximize your ability to use, share, and adapt it. These lectures have been modified in the process of making a publicly shareable version. The citation key on the following slide provides information about how you may share and adapt this material. Copyright holders of content included in this material should contact open.michigan@umich.edu with any questions, corrections, or clarification regarding the use of content. For more information about how to cite these materials visit http://open.umich.edu/privacy-and-terms-use. Any medical information in this material is intended to inform and educate and is not a tool for self-diagnosis or a replacement for medical evaluation, advice, diagnosis or treatment by a healthcare professional. Please speak to your physician if you have questions about your medical condition. Viewer discretion is advised: Some medical content is graphic and may not be suitable for all viewers. 1  
  2. 2. Attribution Key for more information see: http://open.umich.edu/wiki/AttributionPolicy Use + Share + Adapt { Content the copyright holder, author, or law permits you to use, share and adapt. } Public Domain – Government: Works that are produced by the U.S. Government. (17 USC § 105) Public Domain – Expired: Works that are no longer protected due to an expired copyright term. Public Domain – Self Dedicated: Works that a copyright holder has dedicated to the public domain. Creative Commons – Zero Waiver Creative Commons – Attribution License Creative Commons – Attribution Share Alike License Creative Commons – Attribution Noncommercial License Creative Commons – Attribution Noncommercial Share Alike License GNU – Free Documentation License Make Your Own Assessment { Content Open.Michigan believes can be used, shared, and adapted because it is ineligible for copyright. } Public Domain – Ineligible: Works that are ineligible for copyright protection in the U.S. (17 USC § 102(b)) *laws in your jurisdiction may differ { Content Open.Michigan has used under a Fair Use determination. } Fair Use: Use of works that is determined to be Fair consistent with the U.S. Copyright Act. (17 USC § 107) *laws in your jurisdiction may differ Our determination DOES NOT mean that all uses of this 3rd-party content are Fair Uses and we DO NOT guarantee that your use of the content is Fair. 2   To use this content you should do your own independent analysis to determine whether or not your use will be Fair.
  3. 3. Gastrointes-nal  Bleeding  in  the   Pediatric  Pa-ent   Michele  M.  Carney,  M.D.   Combined  EM  Resident/PEM  Fellow   Conference   November  9,  2011   3  
  4. 4. Objec-ve     Review  the  causes  of  upper  and  lower   gastrointes-nal  bleeding  in  the  pediatric   popula-on.    Provide  some  diagnos-c  tools  and   management  strategies  for  the  most  common   offenders.   4  
  5. 5. Introduc-on   •  Bloody  emesis  or  bloody  stools  are  very  anxiety   provoking  for  parents   •  Gastrointes-nal  bleeding  is  common  in  the  pediatric   popula-on.   •  Fortunately,  most  are  from  non-­‐serious  causes   –  Anal  fissures,  infec-ous,  milk  protein  allergy,  oral  trauma,   prolapse  gastropathy  or  esophagi-s/gastri-s   •  Hemodynamically  significant  bleeding  is  uncommon.     5  
  6. 6. Upper  GI  bleed   •  Bleeding  proximal  to  the  ligament  of  Treitz.   –  Presents  with:   •  Hematemesis  –  vomi-ng  bright  red  blood  or  coffee-­‐ ground  material.   •  Melena  –  black,  tarry  stools.   –  Time  for  gastric  juices  and  bacteria  degrada-on.   •  If  massive  then  hematochezia.   –  Shorter  transit  -me.   –  More  blood  loss  than  lower  GI  bleeding.   6  
  7. 7. Ligament  of  Treitz   Source undetermined 7  
  8. 8. Lower  GI  bleed   •  Bleeding  distal  to  the  ligament  of  Treitz   –  Presents  with:   •  Hematochezia  –  bright  red  blood  per  rectum   •  Maroon  stools  –  profuse  bleed  from  distal  small  bowel   –  The  higher  the  bleed,  the  darker  the  stool   8  
  9. 9. Is  it  really  blood?   •  Hemoccult  kits   –  Used  to  test  stool  for  blood.   –  Employs  a  peroxidase-­‐like  ac-vity  in  hemoglobin  to   oxidize  with  the  reagent  changing  the  color  to  blue.   –  False  posi-ve:  red  meat,  horseradish,  turnips,  iron,   tomatoes  and  fresh  red  cherries.   –  False  nega-ves:  Vitamin  C,  storage  for  more  than  4   days  or  outdated  reagents  or  cards.   –  False  nega-ves  occur  with  emesis  due  to  its  acidic   nature.   9  
  10. 10. Is  it  really  blood?   –  Gastroccult  kits     •  Used  to  determine  if  blood  is  present  in  vomit.   •   Neutralizes  the  gastric  acid  in  emesis  making  it   more  accurate.   10  
  11. 11. Clinical  Evalua-on   •  Hemodynamic  stability   –  Vitals   •  Tachycardia,  orthosta-c,  hypotensive..     –  Perfusion   •  Mental  status,  urine  output,  capillary  refill…   •  Blood  in  the  oropharynx?   •  Hernia?   •  Skin  exam:  bruises,  petechia,  telangiectasia  ,   jaundice?   •  Blood/fissures  at  the  anus?   11  
  12. 12. Causes:  Neonates   Neonates  (less  than  1  month):   –  Upper   •  Hemorrhagic  disease  of  the  newborn     •  Swallowed  maternal  blood   •  Stress  gastri-s   –  Lower     •  Anal  fissure   •  Allergic  coli-s   •  Hirshsprungs  with  enterocoli-s   •  Malrota-on  with  volvulus   •  Necro-zing  enterocoli-s       12  
  13. 13. Case  #1   •  5  day  old  ex)38  week  breasfed  neonate  with   hematemesis.     Vitals:     •  Temp:  36.5   •  HR:  150   •  RR:35   •  BP:  70/45     Sick  or  Not  sick   13  
  14. 14. Upper  GI  bleed:  not  sick   •  Swallowed  maternal  blood  from  delivery  or   breast  feeding   –  Apt  test  (don’t  do  at  UM)   •  APT  (alum-­‐precipitated  toxoid)  test   •  gastric  contents  of  neonate  mixed  with  1%  sodium   hydroxide   •  maternal  hemoglobin  turns  rusty  brown   –  Kleihauer-­‐Betke:  sample  exposed  to  acid  to  eliminate   adult  hemoglobin  (quan-ta-ve  test)   –  Mom  usually  gives  great  history  of  painful  nursing     •  Gastri-s  from  stressful  birth   14  
  15. 15. Upper  or  Lower  GI  bleed   •  If  the  baby  was  born  at  home  or  mom  refused   Vitamin  K  shot            Hemorrhagic  disease  of  the   newborn.   –  Vitamin  K  deficiency   –  Peaks  48  to  72  hours     •  Other  coagulopathies   –  Liver  disease   –  Metabolic  disease   15  
  16. 16. Upper  GI  bleed   •  If  the  history  is  unclear            it  is  reasonable  to   check:     –  CBC   –  Coags   –  Chemistry  with  liver  enzymes       16  
  17. 17. Case  #2   •  5  day  old  ex)  36  week  neonate  presents  with   bloody  stool.   •  Vitals:     –  Temp:37     –  Heart  rate:  190   –  Respiratory  rate:  72   –  Blood  pressure  76/45   –  Pulse  ox:  97%  on  room  air     Sick  or  Not  sick?   17  
  18. 18. Source undetermined 18  
  19. 19. Necro-zing  enterocoli-s  (NEC)   •  Overall  rate  of  NEC  in  full  term  infants  is   approximately  0.7  per  1000  live  births,  which   is  almost  10%  of  all  cases   •  Mean  age  to  presenta-on  for  full  term  is  4-­‐5   days   •  Mean  age  to  presenta-on  for  premature  is  10   days   19  
  20. 20. Necro-zing  enterocoli-s  (NEC)   •  Most  common  acquired  gastrointes-nal   disorder   •  Small  (most  oken  distal)  and/or  large  bowel   becomes  injured   •  Intramural  air,  and  may  progress  to  frank   necrosis  with  perfora-on        Sepsis/Death   20  
  21. 21. Necro-zing  enterocoli-s  (NEC)   •  Cause  is  unknown   –  Intes-nal  ischemia     –  Coloniza-on  by  pathogenic  bacteria   –  Excess  protein  substrate  in  the  intes-nal  lumen   1.  2.  Santulli  TV,  Schullinger  JN,  Heird  WC,  et  al.  Acute  necro-zing  enterocoli-s  in  infancy:a   review  of  64  cases.  Pediatrics  1975;55(3):376–87.   Kosloske  AM.  Pathogenesis  and  preven-on  of  necro-zing  enterocoli-s:  a  hypothesis   basedon  personal  observa-on  and  a  review  of  the  literature.  Pediatrics  1984;74(6):1086– 92.   21  
  22. 22. Necro-zing  enterocoli-s  (NEC)   •  •  •  •  •  •  Bowel  rest     Nasogastric  tube  decompression   Fluid  resuscita-on   Blood  and  platelet  transfusion  if  needed   Broad-­‐spectrum  an-bio-cs   Pediatric  Surgery  Consult   22  
  23. 23. Case  #3   •  4  week  old  male  with  poor  feeding  today   presented  with  black  stool   •  Vitals:   –  Temp:  37.5   –  HR:  170   –  RR:  45   –  BP:  85/47   –  Pulse  ox:  97%   23  
  24. 24. Case  #3   In  the  emergency  department,  pa-ent’s  vomit   was  green   24  
  25. 25. Malrota-on  with  volvulus   25   Source undetermined
  26. 26. Source undetermined 26  
  27. 27. Malrota-on   •  14  year  old     boy  with  recurrent   abdominal  pain  and   bilious  emesis     Source undetermined 27  
  28. 28. Malrota-on   •  Incidence  of  malrota-on  is  1  in  500  live  births   •  60%  of  volvulus  cases  occur  in  the  first  month  of   life;  75%  by  1  year  of  age   •  Volvulus  occurs  in  70%  of  neonatal  malrota-on   cases   •  No  race  predilec-on;  male:female  is  3:2   •  Morbidity:  short-­‐gut,  TPN,  SBO,  recurrent   volvulus     •  Mortality:  3-­‐9%   28  
  29. 29. Malrota-on   •  Malrota-on  with  midgut  volvulus  is  the  most   cri-cal  surgical  emergency  in  the  newborn   period     •  Usually  presents  within  the  first  weeks  of  life   •  Presents  with  the  sudden  onset  of  melena  and   bilious  vomi-ng  in  a  previously  health  infant     29  
  30. 30. Normal   •  4th  and  5th  week  of  gesta-on   –  Duodenal  intes-nal  loop  comes  out  and  twists  90   degrees.  Counterclockwise.   –   Cecal  loop  rotates  180  degrees.   –  Total  of  270  degrees   –  Ileocecal  valve  in  right  lower  quadrant     –  Ligament  of  Treitz  in  the  lek  upper  quadrant.   –  Long  and  strong  mesenteric  base   30  
  31. 31. Malrota-on   •  Duodenal  intes-nal  loop  comes  out  but  does   not  rotate.   •  Cecal  loop  rotates  90  degrees  instead  of  180   degrees.   •  Cecum  ends  up  in  the  mid-­‐upper  abdomen.   –  Fixed  by  Ladd’s  bands  to  the  right  lateral   abdominal  wall.   •  Causes  obstruc-on  to  duodenum.   31  
  32. 32. •    Children  (>  1  month  to  2  years)     Upper   –  –  –  –  Esophagi-s/gastri-s   Hypertrophic  pyloric  stenosis   Pep-c  ulcer  disease   Esophageal  varices  from  portal  hypertension   •  Lower   –  –  –  –  –  –  –    Anal  fissure   Milk  protein  allergy   Intussuscep-on   Hernia   Meckel’s  diver-culum   Malrota-on   Gastroenteri-s     32  
  33. 33. Upper  GI  bleed   •  Significant  bleeding  regardless  of  the  cause   requires  inves-ga-on   –  Gastric  lavage  to  determine  con-nua-on  of   bleeding   –  Proton  pump  inhibitors  (IV)  shown  to  reduce  the   risk  of  rebleeding  of  ulcers,  hospital  stay  and  need   for  transfusion  (adult  studies)   –  H2-­‐  receptor  antagonists  not  found  to  be   beneficial  (adult  studies)   33  
  34. 34. Upper  GI  bleed   –  Octreo-de  for  esophageal  varices  *   •  Portal  venous  inflow  and  intravariceal  pressure   •  1  microgram/kg  over  5  min.  then  1  microgram/kg/hr   •  No  great  studies  in  pediatrics   •  Bleed  from  esophageal  varices  has  a  30%  mortality   rate**           –  Endoscopy   *Octreo-de  in  Pediatric  Pa-ents*Janice  B.  Heikenen,  †John  F.  Pohl,  ‡Steven  L.  Werlin,  and  §John  C.  Bucuvalas   Journal  of  Pediatric  Gastroenterology  and  Nutri6on   35:600–609  ©  November  2002  Lippincov  Williams  &  Wilkins,  Inc.,  Philadelphia     **Management  of  portal  hypertension  in  children.  Mile-  E,  Rosenthal  P.   Curr  Gastroenterol  Rep.  2011  Feb;13(1):10-­‐6.  University  of  California,  San  Francisco,  San  Francisco,  CA  94143-­‐0136,  USA.  Mile-E@peds.ucsf.edu       34  
  35. 35. Upper  GI  bleed   •  Resuscita-on   –  If  hemodynamically  compromised   •  Two  large  bore  IV   •  20cc/kg  of  normal  saline  given   •  Packed  red  blood  cells  given  15  cc/kg  maintain   hematocrit  near  30  g/dl   •  5cc/kg  PRBC  raise  Hct  5%   •  Fresh  frozen  plasma  to  correct  coagula-on   abnormali-es  15  cc/kg   •  Platelet  transfusion  for  platelets  <  50   35  
  36. 36. Case  #4   •  2  year  old  female  with  choking  episode,  now   with  blood  streaked  vomitus   Vital  Signs:   Temp:36.6   HR:  135   RR:28   BP:110/60   Pulse  ox:  98%  on  room  air   36  
  37. 37. Lower  GI  bleed   •  •  •  •  •  •  Anal  fissure   Gastroenteri-s   Intussuscep-on   Milk  protein  allergy   Meckel’s  diver-culum   Malrota-on     37  
  38. 38. Case  #5   15  month  old  female  with  chief  complaint  of   lethargy.     Vital  Signs:   Temp:  37.5   HR:  150   RR:  32   BP  90/54   Pulse  ox:  97%  room  air   38  
  39. 39. Intussuscep-on   •  Most  common  cause  of  bowel  obstruc-on   ages  3  months  to  5  years   •  50%  occur  between  3  months  to  1  year   •  80%  occur  by  2  years   •  Peak  incidence  at  7-­‐8  months   •  2-­‐4  cases  per  1000  live  births   •  Male:female  is  2:1   •  Mortality  1%   39  
  40. 40. Intussuscep-on:  Presenta-on   •  Severe  colicky  pain,  legs  and  knees  flexed   •  The  infant  may  ini-ally  be  comfortable  and   play  normally  between  the  episodes  but  then   progressively  weaker  and  lethargic   •  Less  then  15%  have  the  triad  of  pain,  palpable   sausage  mass  and  currant  jelly  stools   40  
  41. 41. Intussuscep-on:  Pathophysiology   •  Telescoping  of  ileum  into  colon            ileum   compressed        venous  conges-on          swelling         arterial  compression        ischemia             Bloody  stools   41  
  42. 42. Intussuscep-on:  Ultrasound   Source undetermined 42  
  43. 43. Intussuscep-on   •  Crescent  sign  LUQ   •  Target  sign  RUQ   •  Loss  of  hepa-c  outline   Source undetermined 43  
  44. 44. Intussuscep-on   •  Study  in  South  Africa  showed  that  Burkiv   lymphoma  presented  as  intussuscep-on     Intussuscep-on  as  a  presen-ng  feature  of  Burkiv  lymphoma:  implica-ons  for   management  and  outcome.   England  RJ,  Pillay  K,  Davidson  A,  Numanoglu  A,  Millar  AJ.   Department  of  Paediatric  Surgery,  Red  Cross  War  Memorial  Children's  Hospital,   University  of  Cape  Town,  Klipfontein  Road,  Rondebosch,  Cape  Town,  7700,  South   Africa,  r.england@doctors.org.uk.     44  
  45. 45. Case  #  6   •  A  six  week  old  formula  fed  infant  presents  with   two  stools  with  a  small  amount  of  blood  mixed   with  mucous   Vitals:     •  Temp:  37   •  HR:  130   •  RR:  32   •  BP:  72/49   Sick  or  not  sick   45  
  46. 46.   Cows  milk  protein  allergy     •  Immunologic  hypersensi-vity  reac-on  to  milk   proteins   •  2-­‐6%  formula  fed   •  0.5%  breast  fed  infants   •  50-­‐60%  present  with  gastrointes-nal/skin   symptoms   •  30%  respiratory  symptoms   46  
  47. 47. Management   •  Removal  of  cow’s  milk  from  the  diet   •  30%  also  allergic  to  soy   •  Need  hydrolyzed  protein  formula   47  
  48. 48. Finish  Study   The  study  involved  40  consecu-ve  infants  (mean  age:  2.7  months)   with  visible  rectal  bleeding  during  a  2-­‐year  period  at  the  Tampere   University  Hospital  Department  of  Pediatrics     •  18%  turned  out  to  be  allergic  coli:s  otherwise  no  cause  was  found   •  Suggested  virus  played  a  role                                     Rectal  bleeding  in  infancy:  clinical,  allergological,  and  microbiological  examina:on.   Arvola  T,  Ruuska  T,  Keränen  J,  Hyöty  H,  Salminen  S,  Isolauri  E.    Department  of  Paediatrics,  Tampere  University  Hospital,  Tampere,  Finland.   taina.arvola@uta.fi   48  
  49. 49. Case  #7   11  year  old  male  with  lethargy  and  pale   appearance.     Vital  signs:   Temp:  37.7   HR:140   BP:  90/60   Pulse  ox:  95%  room  air   49  
  50. 50. Case  #7   •  Labs  revealed:  hemoglobin  level  of  4.8  g/dl,   and  a  hematocrit  of  14.6%     By  the  way…he  has  been  having  bloody  stools   for  2  weeks   50  
  51. 51. Meckel’s  Diver-culum   Acid  secre-ng  mucosa   2%  (of  the  popula-on)   2  feet  (from  the  ileocecal  valve)   2  inches  (in  length)    2%  are  symptoma-c    2  types  of  common  ectopic  -ssue  (gastric  and   pancrea-c)   •  2  years  is  the  most  common  age  at  clinical   presenta-on   •  2  -mes  more  boys  are  affected.   •  •  •  •  •  •  51  
  52. 52. Meckel’s  Diver-culum   •  infants  and  preschool  children   –  slight  or  massive  GI  bleeding  -­‐  painless   •  incomplete  oblitera-on  of  omphalmomestenteric   duct   –  ectopic  gastric  mucosa  in  the  remnant   –  ulcera-on  of  mucosa  across  from  the  diver-culum     •  Meckel    Scan   –  Techne-um  pernechnetate  has  affinity  for  gastric   mucosa   52  
  53. 53. GI  bleeding  in  Adolescents   Upper   •  Pep-c  ulcer/gastri-s   •  Prolapse  (trauma-c)  gastropathy  secondary  to  emesis   •  Mallory-­‐Weiss  syndrome   •  Coagulopathy     •  Esophageal  varices     Lower   •  Bacterial  enteri-s   •  Inflammatory  bowel  disease   •  Colonic  polyps   •  Anal  fissure   •  Meckel’s  diver-culum   53  
  54. 54. Case  #  8   •  2  year  old  male  with  history  of  asthma  has  ear   pain  for  2  days,  now  bever  aker  taking   omnicef.    Mom  is  concerned  because  she   found  blood  in  his  stool.   •  Vitals:   –  37.5/122/23/97%  on  room  air    96/63   54  
  55. 55. Quiz   •  2  year  old  boy  with  bilious  vomi-ng  and   bloody  stools  since  last  night.    Presents  today   moderately  ill,  dehydrated  with  scaphoid   abdomen  and  no  bowel  sounds.    Aker  ABC   what  is  your  next  step?   55  
  56. 56. •  •  •  •  •  A.  Ultrasound  of  abdomen   B.  Upper  GI   C.  CT  of  the  abdomen   D.  Meckel  scan   E.  Upper  endoscopic  exam   56  
  57. 57. •  12  year  old  boy  S/P  Kasai  for  biliary  atresia   presents  with  pruri-s,  mild  icterus  and   hematemesis.    Physical  shows  an  anxious  boy   with  normal  vital  signs,  hepatosplenomegaly   and  prominent  venous  pavern  over  the   abdomen.    Stools  are  black  and  guaic  posi-ve.     Cause  of  hematemesis:   57  
  58. 58. •  •  •  •  •  A.  Pep-c  Ulcer  disease   B.  Esophageal  varices   C.  Posterior  nasal  bleeding   D.  Prolapse  gastropathy   E.  Thrombocytopenia   58  
  59. 59. •  5  year  old  with  intermivent,  painless  bright   red  blood  per  rectum  associated  with  bowel   movements  for  the  past  3  months.  Inspec-on   of  the  anus  shows  no  fissures  but  blood  on   rectal  exam.    Most  likely  cause:   59  
  60. 60. •  •  •  •  •  A.  Intussuscep-on   B.  Juvenile  polyp   C.  Meckel  diver-culum   D.  Pep-c  Ulcer  disease   E.  Ulcera-ve  coli-s   60  
  61. 61. •  5  year  old  girl  complains  of  severe  perianal   pain  on  stooling.    Physical  shows  an  intensely   red,  warm  and  tender  perianal  -ssue.    Rectal   shows  gross  blood.    What  organism  is  causing   these  findings?   61  
  62. 62. •  •  •  •  •  A.  Campylobacter   B.  C.  Diff   C.  Streptococcal   D.  Salmonella   E.  Shigella   62  
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