Author: John Williams, M.D., Ph.D., 2009License: Unless otherwise noted, this material is made available under the terms o...
Citation Key                      for more information see: http://open.umich.edu/wiki/CitationPolicyUse + Share + Adapt  ...
M1 - GI Sequence               Pancreas        John Williams, M.D., Ph.D.Winter, 2009
PANCREASGray’s Anatomy, wikimedia commons
The pancreas is made up of three functional components:      Endocrine – Islets 2%      Exocrine – Acinar 80%             ...
John Williams modified from Kent Christensen
REGULATION OF PANCREATIC SECRETION  Jim Sherman
Stimulation of Pancreatic Secretion during the Intestinal Phase      Frank Boumphrey, M.D., wikimedia commons
Stimulation of Pancreatic Secretion during the Intestinal Phase               Paracrine stimulation               Within t...
Source Undetermined
Concentration of Ions in Pancreatic Juice as a Function of Flow            Fig. 9-2 Johnson, L. Gastrointestinal Physiolog...
Pancreatic Bicarbonate output increases in response to                  low Duodenal pH              Fig. 9-5 Johnson, L. ...
Mechanism of Pancreatic Bicarbonate Secretion    John Williams
INTRACELLULAR TRANSPORT OF PANCREATIC SECRETORY PROTEINS                    Source Undetermined
Stimulus-secretion Coupling of Pancreatic Enzyme Secretion                  John Williams
Source Undetermined
Activation of Pancreatic Proenzymes in the Intestine involvesEnterokinase and activated Trypsin                           ...
Additional Source Information               for more information see: http://open.umich.edu/wiki/CitationPolicySlide 4: Gr...
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01.09.09: Pancreas

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Slideshow is from the University of Michigan Medical School's M1 Gastrointestinal / Liver sequence

View additional course materials on Open.Michigan:
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01.09.09: Pancreas

  1. 1. Author: John Williams, M.D., Ph.D., 2009License: Unless otherwise noted, this material is made available under the terms ofthe Creative Commons Attribution–Non-commercial–Share Alike 3.0 License:http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/We have reviewed this material in accordance with U.S. Copyright Law and have tried to maximize your ability to use, share, andadapt it. The citation key on the following slide provides information about how you may share and adapt this material.Copyright holders of content included in this material should contact open.michigan@umich.edu with any questions, corrections, orclarification regarding the use of content.For more information about how to cite these materials visit http://open.umich.edu/education/about/terms-of-use.Any medical information in this material is intended to inform and educate and is not a tool for self-diagnosis or a replacement formedical evaluation, advice, diagnosis or treatment by a healthcare professional. Please speak to your physician if you have questionsabout your medical condition.Viewer discretion is advised: Some medical content is graphic and may not be suitable for all viewers.
  2. 2. Citation Key for more information see: http://open.umich.edu/wiki/CitationPolicyUse + Share + Adapt { Content the copyright holder, author, or law permits you to use, share and adapt. } Public Domain – Government: Works that are produced by the U.S. Government. (USC 17 § 105) Public Domain – Expired: Works that are no longer protected due to an expired copyright term. Public Domain – Self Dedicated: Works that a copyright holder has dedicated to the public domain. Creative Commons – Zero Waiver Creative Commons – Attribution License Creative Commons – Attribution Share Alike License Creative Commons – Attribution Noncommercial License Creative Commons – Attribution Noncommercial Share Alike License GNU – Free Documentation LicenseMake Your Own Assessment { Content Open.Michigan believes can be used, shared, and adapted because it is ineligible for copyright. } Public Domain – Ineligible: Works that are ineligible for copyright protection in the U.S. (USC 17 § 102(b)) *laws in your jurisdiction may differ { Content Open.Michigan has used under a Fair Use determination. } Fair Use: Use of works that is determined to be Fair consistent with the U.S. Copyright Act. (USC 17 § 107) *laws in your jurisdiction may differ Our determination DOES NOT mean that all uses of this 3rd-party content are Fair Uses and we DO NOT guarantee that your use of the content is Fair. To use this content you should do your own independent analysis to determine whether or not your use will be Fair.
  3. 3. M1 - GI Sequence Pancreas John Williams, M.D., Ph.D.Winter, 2009
  4. 4. PANCREASGray’s Anatomy, wikimedia commons
  5. 5. The pancreas is made up of three functional components: Endocrine – Islets 2% Exocrine – Acinar 80% Digestive Enzymes Exocrine - Ducts 8% Bicarbonate Rich Fluid Innervation Vagal – Acini Ach main transmitter Ducts Islets Sympathetic – Islets NE main transmitter Blood Vessels
  6. 6. John Williams modified from Kent Christensen
  7. 7. REGULATION OF PANCREATIC SECRETION Jim Sherman
  8. 8. Stimulation of Pancreatic Secretion during the Intestinal Phase Frank Boumphrey, M.D., wikimedia commons
  9. 9. Stimulation of Pancreatic Secretion during the Intestinal Phase Paracrine stimulation Within the mucosa Endocrine stimulation John Williams modified from undetermined source
  10. 10. Source Undetermined
  11. 11. Concentration of Ions in Pancreatic Juice as a Function of Flow Fig. 9-2 Johnson, L. Gastrointestinal Physiology, 7th ed. Mosby Elsevier, Philadelphia, PA; 2007: 87.
  12. 12. Pancreatic Bicarbonate output increases in response to low Duodenal pH Fig. 9-5 Johnson, L. Gastrointestinal Physiology, 6th ed. Mosby Elsevier, St. Louis, MO; 2001: 102.
  13. 13. Mechanism of Pancreatic Bicarbonate Secretion John Williams
  14. 14. INTRACELLULAR TRANSPORT OF PANCREATIC SECRETORY PROTEINS Source Undetermined
  15. 15. Stimulus-secretion Coupling of Pancreatic Enzyme Secretion John Williams
  16. 16. Source Undetermined
  17. 17. Activation of Pancreatic Proenzymes in the Intestine involvesEnterokinase and activated Trypsin ` Jim Sherman
  18. 18. Additional Source Information for more information see: http://open.umich.edu/wiki/CitationPolicySlide 4: Gray’s Anatomy Plate 1100, Wikimedia Commons,http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Gray_1100_Pancreatic_duct.pngSlide 6 – John Williams modified from Kent ChristensenSlide 7 – Jim ShermanSlide 8: Frank Boumphrey, M.D., Wikimedia Commons, http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Pancreas_secretion.png,CC:BY-SA http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/Slide 9 – John Williams modified from undeterminedSlide 10 – Source UndeterminedSlide 11 – Fig. 9-2 Johnson, L. Gastrointestinal Physiology, 7th ed. Mosby Elsevier, Philadelphia, PA; 2007: 87.Slide 12 – Fig. 9-5 Johnson, L. Gastrointestinal Physiology, 6th ed. Mosby Elsevier, St. Louis, MO; 2001: 102.Slide 13 – John WilliamsSlide 14 – Source UndeterminedSlide 15 – John WilliamsSlide 16 – Source UndeterminedSlide 17 – Jim Sherman

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