Open journalism & the open web project management

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  • 1. Open Journalism & the Open Web Project Management September 27, 2010
  • 2. Who am I?
    • Rob Purdie – Scrum Practice Leader, The Economist online
        • Have managed technology projects since 1995
        • Received PMP certification in 2003
        • Started Important Projects, Inc. in 2004
        • Began practicing Agile methods in 2006
        • Received ScrumMaster certification in 2008
        • Started working with The Economist in 2008
      • [email_address]
      • http://twitter.com/robpurdie
      • http://facebook.com/robpurdie
      • http://robpurdie.net
    Open Journalism & the Open Web – Project Management September 27, 2008
  • 3. Session outline
    • What is project management? (10 mins)
    • What makes Web development projects so hard? (10 mins)
    • How should hacks and hackers manage projects? (15 mins)
    • Questions (15 mins)
    • Assignment (10 mins)
    Open Journalism & the Open Web – Project Management September 27, 2008
  • 4. What is project management?
    • "A composite activity with multiple dimensions" – Max Wideman
    • "The application of skills, knowledge, tools and techniques to
    • project activities to meet project requirements" – PMBOK
    • " The discipline of planning, organizing, securing and managing
    • resources to bring about the successful completion of specific
    • goals and objectives " – Wikipedia
    Open Journalism & the Open Web – Project Management September 27, 2008
  • 5. The project management challenge
    • To meet the requirements of the project and achieve the
    • objectives of the project while honouring the constraints of the
    • project
    • These constraints are typically scope, time and cost
    Open Journalism & the Open Web – Project Management September 27, 2008 S T C
  • 6. When can projects succeed?
    • When there is an equitable commitment between the sponsor
    • and the team – when risks are shared
    • When project success has been defined up front
    • When scope, time and cost (and quality) are mutually
    • consistent and attainable
    • When there is planning before doing
    • When an approach has been established and is understood
    • When the sponsor is empowered to make decisions
    • When the organizational culture is supportive and free of
    • obstacles
    • When the people involved are reasonable and fair and trust
    • each other
    Open Journalism & the Open Web – Project Management September 27, 2008
  • 7. What makes Web development projects so hard?
    • Requirements are often poorly defined or unknown or change
    • Estimates are typically inaccurate
    • Relationships between people involved are often dysfunctional
    • Teams work remotely more and more often
    • Traditional sequential life cycle approach actually increases risk
    Open Journalism & the Open Web – Project Management September 27, 2008
  • 8. How should hacks and hackers manage projects?
    • Closely, together
    • Incrementally (bit by bit) and iteratively (with time set aside to
    • improve the bits)
    • On a time and materials basis
    • With profound respect for each other
    Open Journalism & the Open Web – Project Management September 27, 2008
  • 9. Agile manifesto
      • “ We are uncovering better ways of developing software by doing it and helping others do it.
      • Through this work we have come to value:
      • Individuals and interactions over processes and tools Working deliverables over comprehensive documentation Customer collaboration over contract negotiation Responding to change over following a plan
      • That is, while there is value in the items on the right, we value the items on the left more.”
    Open Journalism & the Open Web – Project Management September 27, 2008
  • 10. Agile principles
    • Our highest priority is to satisfy the customer through early and continuous delivery of valuable software.
    • Welcome changing requirements, even late in development. Agile processes harness change for the customer's competitive advantage.
    • Deliver working software frequently, from a couple of weeks to a couple of months, with a preference to the shorter timescale.
    • Business people and developers must work together daily throughout the project.
    • Build projects around motivated individuals. Give them the environment and support they need, and trust them to get the job done.
    • The most efficient and effective method of conveying information to and within a development team is face-to-face conversation.
    • Working software is the primary measure of progress.
    • Agile processes promote sustainable development. The sponsors, developers, and users should be able to maintain a constant pace indefinitely.
    • Continuous attention to technical excellence and good design enhances agility.
    • Simplicity – the art of maximising the amount of work not done – is essential.
    • The best architectures, requirements, and designs emerge from self-organising teams.
    • At regular intervals, the team reflects on how to become more effective, then tunes and adjusts
    • its behavior accordingly.
    Open Journalism & the Open Web – Project Management September 27, 2008
  • 11. The Scrum process flow Open Journalism & the Open Web – Project Management September 27, 2008
  • 12. Questions
      •  
    Open Journalism & the Open Web – Project Management September 27, 2008
  • 13. Assignment
      •  
    Open Journalism & the Open Web – Project Management September 27, 2008
    • Pick a piece of functionality you would like to implement
    • Work together to break that functionality into features
    • Prioritize those features based on business/customer value
    • Come up with a plan for the incremental and iterative delivery