How Silicon Valley Became a Special Place

1,483 views

Published on

Published in: Business
0 Comments
4 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,483
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
19
Comments
0
Likes
4
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

How Silicon Valley Became a Special Place

  1. 1. How Silicon Valley Became aSpecial Place for Innovation and Entrepreneurship Richard Allan Horning SNR Denton US LLP Silicon Valley Richard.horning@snrdenton.com
  2. 2. SNR Denton
  3. 3. I HELP THE TECHNOLOGYSTARTUP GROW FROM THIS
  4. 4. TO THIS
  5. 5. INNOVATIONInnovation is the specific tool ofentrepreneurs, the means by which theyexploit change as an opportunity for adifferent business or service. It is capable ofbeing presented as a discipline, capable ofbeing learned, capable of being practiced. (Peter Drucker, 1985, Innovation and Entrepreneurship)
  6. 6. ELEMENTS OF ANENTREPRENEURIAL ENVIRONMENT• Perceived Opportunities• Culture of Risk Takers and Respect for Failure• Support Infrastructure• Propagation of Knowledge and Skills• First Class Educational System Encouraging Entrepreneurship• Capital and Liquidity• Rewards and Honors• Repetition and Reinvestment
  7. 7. THE INVENTION OF SILICON VALLEYDon Hoefler, “Silicon Valley USA”,Microelectronic News, January 11, 1971
  8. 8. EARLY OBSERVATION OF THE OPPORTUNITY“In the hands of an enterprising people, what acountry [California] might be” -- Richard HenryDana, Jr., Two Years Before the Mast (1840)
  9. 9. A VAST WASTELAND“A village of 600 to 800 inhabitants … with thousands of ground squirrels burrowing in the plaza” – description of San Jose in 1846 when the population of all of California was 7,500“Not a single modern wagon to be had…, nothing but the old Mexican cart withwooden wheels, drawn by two or threepairs of oxen yoked by the horns” -- Lt.William Tecumseh Sherman, reportingon Monterey in 1847
  10. 10. JANUARY 24, 1848 Eureka !“Gold Mine Found”, The Californian, March15, 1848“California, no doubt, is rich in mineral wealth;great chances are here for scientific capitalists”
  11. 11. CALIFORNIA IN 1865• Population has soared to 365,000• Wheat crop more valuable than gold• Manufacturing revenue $20M greater than gold mined in foothills
  12. 12. JESUITS ARRIVE 1849
  13. 13. SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY FOUNDED 1851
  14. 14. THE BIG FOURCrocker, Hopkins, Stanford, Huntington
  15. 15. OPENING THE WEST 1863 - 1869
  16. 16. THE FARM
  17. 17. THE TECHNOLOGY STARTUP 1893
  18. 18. EARLY WI-FI
  19. 19. POULSEN WIRELESS / FEDERAL RADIO SPIN OFFS• Magnavox• Fisher Research Labs• Litton Industries• Lee de Forest• Frederick Terman
  20. 20. The “Godfather” of the Valley
  21. 21. THE LAND GRANT SCHOOL Founded 1855
  22. 22. BERKELEY CYCLOTRON (1932)
  23. 23. CROCKER RESEARCH LAB
  24. 24. WHERE IT ALL STARTED TV
  25. 25. THE IMPORTANCE OF NETWORKING“In the early days of the semiconductor industry there were certain places that everyone frequented and the standing joke was that if you couldn’t figure out your process problems, go down to the Wagon Wheel and ask somebody.”Annalee Saxenian, Regional Advantage (1996),p. xi
  26. 26. THE IMPORTANCE OF NETWORKING Woodside CA
  27. 27. NETWORKING OPPORTUNITIES
  28. 28. THE ROLE OF PROXIMITY IN INNOVATION “To the extent that product and processinnovation is based on new ideas and that thecreation of ideas is a social process involvingdiscussion, then geographic proximity isimportant in innovation”Michael Best, The New Competition: Institutionsof Industrial Restructuring (1990), p. 235
  29. 29. SHOCKLEY SEMI-CONDUCTOR
  30. 30. THE TRAITOROUS EIGHT
  31. 31. THE GOLD RUSH LEGACYBusiness & Professions Code Section16600“Except as provided in this chapter, everycontract by which anyone is restrained fromengaging in a lawful profession, trade, orbusiness of any kind is to that extent void.”
  32. 32. COOPERATIVE COMPETITION
  33. 33. EXIT POSSIBILITIES
  34. 34. EXIT POSSIBILITIES
  35. 35. EXIT POSSIBILITIES
  36. 36. WHY SILICON VALLEY SUCCEEDED• "Its the regulatory environment, the cultural attitudes, the social and professional networks that connect people. Its the attitude toward failure - how you deal with that. Those are things that are much harder to change than it is to build up the research facilities." Prof. William Miller, Stanford

×