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Center for Technology in Government by Dr. Theresa Pardo

Center for Technology in Government by Dr. Theresa Pardo

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Center for Technology in Government Center for Technology in Government Presentation Transcript

  • Dr. Theresa A. Pardo Center for Technology in Government University at Albany, State University of New York www.ctg.albany.edu [email_address] +1 518-442-3892
    • CTG fosters public sector innovation , enhances capability , generates public value , and supports good governance.
  • Thought leadership in Public Sector ICT Innovation
    • Building research and practice partnerships
      • to define information and technology related problems , challenges, and opportunities.
      • to provide innovative policy leadership and practice guidance to ensure success in the complex world of government information technology.
      • to solve critical problems facing government agencies working separately or together to share information and create levels of capability to interoperate across the boundaries of government organizations and national borders.
      • to plan strategies and assess impact of those strategies; open government, social media, mobility, cloud computing, and more.
    View slide
  • Core research and practice competencies
    • Open Government Planning and Public Value Assessment
    • Understanding Value and Risk in Public Sector IT Investments
    • Building Intergovernmental Collaborations
    • Information Sharing and Integration
    • Interoperability
    • Social Media – Policy for government
    • Social Media – As a service deliver platform
    • Building a Case for Strategic Technology Innovation
    • Capability Assessment and Action Planning
    • XML as a Website Content Management Tool
    • Critical Decision Making During Crisis
    • Transnational Public Sector Knowledge Networks
    View slide
  • Practice innovations through research partnerships Venues for Research Improvements in Practice Practical Problems of Government Practitioner skill and knowledge Academic skill and knowledge
  • “ What is technically possible may not be organizationally feasible or politically or socially desirable.” “ Advanced IT applications in government must integrate policies, processes, information, and technology.” CTG Addressing the quintessential underlying problems of ICT use in government
  • CTG Enhancing Capability
    • CTG’s Open Government Public Value Assessment Tool (PVAT)
    • CTG’s Eight Essential Elements of Social Media Policy
  • Building an Open Government Plan A Public Value-Based Strategy
  • Question of Interest
    • Does our open government plan, taken as a whole, optimize our resources and capabilities, and maximum public value to all citizens and stakeholders ?
  • A common view of public returns The Investment A Better World Good things happen
  • Traditional v. Public ROI
      • Public measures:
      • many more social and political returns are possible
    Public ROI Traditional ROI
      • Government measures
      • cost savings
      • budget increases
      • productivity gains
      • service quality
      • cost-effectiveness
      • strategic position
  • Foundations of a Public Value View
    • Two major kinds of public value:
      • The value to the public that results from improving the government as a public asset
      • The value that results from delivering specific
      • benefits directly to persons or groups
    • The public value point of view:
      • Assessing public returns should reveal value in terms of stakeholder interests
  • CTG’s Open Government Portfolio Public Value Assessment Tool (PVAT)
    • A tool designed to support open government planning by offering a systematic approach to identifying the public value of an agency's or government’s open government portfolio.
  • Lessons Learned – Why create PVAT?
    • Agency challenges in:
    • linking high level principles of participation, collaboration, and transparency to specific stakeholders and values to strategic agency missions
    • prioritizing ongoing and planned initiatives based on the stakeholders they serve and the value proposition for each
    • re-tooling information lifecycle from collection, management, use, and dissemination to support OG initiatives
    • developing concrete plans for internal change to support new skills and requirements to support
    • OG opportunities
  • PVAT In Use – Creating Value
    • PVAT used to guide the United States Department of Transportation’s Open Government Planning Process
    • “ Using the PVAT we looked in a new way at our open government portfolio to see how our investments in openness and transparency could create value for a wide range of DOT stakeholders.”
      • H. Giovanni Carnaroli , Associate Chief Information Officer (CIO) for Business-Technology Alignment and Governance at the U.S. Department of Transportation.
  • Public Value Types
    • Economic: income, asset values, liabilities, entitlements, risks to these.
    • Political: personal or corporate influence on government & politics.
    • Social: family or community relationships, social mobility, status, identity.
    • Quality of life: security, health, recreation, personal liberty
    • Strategic: economic or political advantage or opportunities, goals, resources for innovation or planning.
    • Ideological: alignment of beliefs, moral or ethical values with government actions or outcomes.
    • Stewardship: public’s view of government officials as faithful stewards.
  • Public Value Generators
    • Efficiency
    • Effectiveness
    • Intrinsic enhancements
    • Transparency
    • Participation
    • Collaboration
  • Systematic Approach to OG
  • Support Choice Making About Investments in OG
  • CTG’s Open Government Portfolio Public Value Assessment Tool (PVAT)
    • Over 300 individual downloads by over:
      • 10 Countries
      • 20 US Federal Agencies
      • 50 US County and municipal agencies
      • 70 Non-governmental and research organizations
      • 15 Consulting companies
  • CTG’s Open Government Portfolio Public Value Assessment Tool (PVAT)
    • Learning more and working with CTG
      • Formal Training Program.
      • Custom Training Program.
      • Hands on support from CTG in the form of consultations with planning teams as well as management of planning and assessment processes.
  • Social Media, Citizen Engagement, and Government
  •  
  • Government social media trends
    • Reaching citizens
      • 46 percent of respondents see it as important for government to post information and alerts on sites like Facebook or Twitter
    • Interacting and communicating
      • 13% of internet users read a blog of a government agency or official, and 2% have posted a comment
      • 5% of internet users followed a government agency or official on a social networking site, only 1% of internet users have posted comments
      • 2% of internet users followed a government agency or official on Twitter (this represents 7% of Twitter users)
    • Perception
      • 41% of people agree that such services are a waste of government money
    Source: Pew Research Center, How Americans Interact with Government Online, April 2010
  • Source: Eight Essential Elements of Social Media Policy, Center for Technology in Government, 2009
  • CTG’s Eight Essential Elements of Social Media Policy
    • CTG’s Eight Essential Elements Report used around the world to inform social media policy development processes.
  • United States DOT Uses CTG’s Eight Essential Elements to Structure Social Media Policy Development Process
    • DOT’s Open Government Plan imposed a Fall 2010 deadline for the DOT to develop its first social media policy.
    • The total time to develop the policy was 6 months.
    • An interdisciplinary working group of 30 DOT employees participated.
    July 2010 June 2010 August 2010 Sept/Oct 2010 November 2010
  • CIOP Social Media Policy Covers Employee Access Official Use Professional Use Personal Use Account Management Official Use Professional/ Personal Use Acceptable Use All Use Employee Conduct Official Use Professional/ Personal Use Security Citizen Conduct Official Use Legal Official Use Professional/ Personal Use Acceptable Apps Official Use Professional Use Personal Use Public Affairs led the drafting of policy statements Social Media Policy Working Group Drafted All Use General Counsel led the drafting of policy statements OCIO led the drafting of policy statements Drafting Policy Statements Citizen Conduct Professional/ Personal Use Content Professional Use Personal Use Official Use
  • Drafting Roles and Responsibilities
    • The Working Group used a Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, Informed (RACI) Matrix to determine what individuals, offices and governance bodies would oversee each policy statement.
    • Responsible parties spanned the OCIO (CISO, CTO, ACIO for Policy Oversight), General Counsel, Public Affairs, Human Resources, and the modal equivalents of those offices.
    • These roles and responsibilities were then included in the draft policy.
  • Coordinating Policies in the DOT Duration: Flexible Duration: Two Weeks Duration: Two Weeks Upon completion of reviews, DOT CIO performs final review and approvals
  • CTG’s Eight Essential Elements and DOT Social Media Policy: A policy development partnership
    • Covers all DOT Employees
    • Specifies an approval process for official accounts
    • Lists specific account management requirements
    • Requires an approved tools list to be developed by the OCIO
    • Requires tool specific guidance to be developed separately—the policy covers high level requirements for records management, accessibility, PRA, intellectual property, and advertisements.
  • CTG’s Social Media Policy Eight Essential Elements
    • Learning more and working with CTG
      • Formal Training Program.
      • Custom Training Programs.
      • Hands on support from CTG in the form of consultations with policy development teams as well as implementation planning and impact assessment processes.
  • Fostering Innovation Building Capability
    • Open Government Portfolio Public Value Assessment Tool (PVAT)
    • All CTG Open Government Related Publications
    • Designing social media policy for government: Eight essential elements
    • CTG’s Publications and Reports
    • CTG’s Annual Report
    • CTG fosters public sector innovation , enhances capability , generates public value , and supports good governance.
  • Dr. Theresa A. Pardo Center for Technology in Government University at Albany, State University of New York www.ctg.albany.edu [email_address] +1 518-442-3892