When Innovation Gets Difficult

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Keynote address delivered at the 2009 annual Midwestern Higher Education Compact meeting in Fargo, ND, November 9, 2009.

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  • After listening to John Seeley Brown, I'm all about the Data-Driven Teaching: Real-time pedagogy via dashboards (slide 103). This approach builds upon some of the most documented effective principles of Applied Behavioral Analysis. I love it!

    Referencing quote on slide 114 'It is not necessary to change. Survival is not mandatory.'-W.E. Demming: I love the idea that survival demands change.

    David Wiley, thank you for promoting a vision and means for institutional innovation!
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When Innovation Gets Difficult

  1. 1. When  Innova*on  Gets  Difficult From  technological  to  ins*tu*onal  innova*on David  Wiley,  PhD Department  of  Instruc*onal  Psychology  &  Technology Brigham  Young  University Monday, November 9, 2009
  2. 2. What  Business  Are  We  In?   A  warm  up  discussion Monday, November 9, 2009
  3. 3. http://www.buffalocommons.org/storyimages/ICE-Delivery-Wagon.jpg Monday, November 9, 2009
  4. 4. What  Business  Are  You  In?   Bringing  people  to  campus? Gran*ng  degrees? Helping  people  get  jobs? Helping  people  learn? Monday, November 9, 2009
  5. 5. The  20th  century  was  a  *me  of   technological  innova*on;   the  21st  century  must  be  a  *me  of   ins,tu,onal  innova*on. Monday, November 9, 2009
  6. 6. Gap  Analysis Let’s  get  some  context Monday, November 9, 2009
  7. 7. Capacity  Gap Demand  for  higher  educa*on   versus  system  capacity Monday, November 9, 2009
  8. 8. 39.6%  enrolled  in  higher  educa*on Monday, November 9, 2009
  9. 9. Extend  This  APR  Worldwide 150M  new  students  coming  into higher  educa*on Monday, November 9, 2009
  10. 10. Currently  at  120M More  new  students  than   current  total  students Monday, November 9, 2009
  11. 11. In  India  Alone 2400  new  universi*es  in  25  years Monday, November 9, 2009
  12. 12. Two  New  Universi*es  Per  Week (Just  to  serve  India) Monday, November 9, 2009
  13. 13. US  APR  Will  Con*nue  to  Grow Knowledge  economy  jobs Monday, November 9, 2009
  14. 14. Employer  Turns*les US  Department  of  Labor  predicts  today’s   student  will  have  10-­‐14  jobs  by  age  38 Monday, November 9, 2009
  15. 15. More,  More,  More More  people need  more  schooling   more  oden Monday, November 9, 2009
  16. 16. Current  System  Will  Not  Scale   Radical  -­‐  not  incremental  -­‐  improvements in  capacity  are  necessary Monday, November 9, 2009
  17. 17. Affordability  Gap Cost  higher  educa*on   versus  available  funds Monday, November 9, 2009
  18. 18. What’s  the  Common  Theme? USC,  Carnegie  Mellon,  Georgetown,   Johns  Hopkins,  Mount  Holyoke,  Duke,   Vanderbilt,  Tuds,  Cornell,  Oberlin,  Vassar Monday, November 9, 2009
  19. 19. 2009-­‐2010  Cost    >    $50,000 Top  100  list  ends  at  $46,860 Monday, November 9, 2009
  20. 20. Tui*on  Increases  8%  Per  Year Cost  doubles  every  decade (Health  care  grows  at  6%  per  year) Monday, November 9, 2009
  21. 21. Textbook  Prices  Up  62% In  the  last  decade (General  books  up  19%) Monday, November 9, 2009
  22. 22. 2009-­‐2010  -­‐  $1,100  in  Textbooks Average  two  year  program  tui*on  $2,500 Monday, November 9, 2009
  23. 23. More,  More,  More Tui*on  costs  more, textbooks  cost  more, much  faster  than  GDP  (4%) Monday, November 9, 2009
  24. 24. Cost  Trends  Unsustainable   Radical  -­‐  not  incremental  -­‐  improvements in  affordability  are  necessary Monday, November 9, 2009
  25. 25. Relevance  Gap Distance  between  higher  educa*on   and  the  real  world Monday, November 9, 2009
  26. 26. Then vs Now Analog ⇒ Digital Tethered ⇒ Mobile Isolated ⇒ Connected Generic ⇒ Personal Consuming ⇒ Contribu*ng Closed ⇒ Open Monday, November 9, 2009
  27. 27. Analog  ⇒  Digital Music,  Phones,  TV,  Newspapers, Movies,  Journals,  Communica*ons, Intelligence,  Defense Monday, November 9, 2009
  28. 28. Tethered  ⇒  Mobile Phones,  Internet  Access, Employment   Monday, November 9, 2009
  29. 29. Isolated  ⇒  Connected People,  Content,  Systems Monday, November 9, 2009
  30. 30. Generic  ⇒  Personal Cars,  Computers,  Mobile  Phones Monday, November 9, 2009
  31. 31. Consuming  ⇒  Contribu*ng Radio  /  Podcas*ng,  Newspapers  /  Blogs   Movies  /  Vodcas*ng Monday, November 9, 2009
  32. 32. Closed  ⇒  Open Sodware  (OSs,  Applica*ons),   Data  (Weather,  GIS), Content  (Blogs,  Wikis) Monday, November 9, 2009
  33. 33. Then vs Now Analog ⇒ Digital Tethered ⇒ Mobile Isolated ⇒ Connected Generic ⇒ Personal Consuming ⇒ Contribu*ng Closed ⇒ Open Monday, November 9, 2009
  34. 34. Educa/on vs Everyday Analog ⇒ Digital Tethered ⇒ Mobile Isolated ⇒ Connected Generic ⇒ Personal Consuming ⇒ Contribu*ng Closed ⇒ Open Monday, November 9, 2009
  35. 35. academic,  adj.  pointless;  irrelevant e.g.,  an  academic  exercise Monday, November 9, 2009
  36. 36. Wait!    We’re  Educa,on! Our  historic  monopoly  is  being   challenged  on  almost  every  front Monday, November 9, 2009
  37. 37. Why  Do  Students  Come? Content,  Research,  Support  Services   Social  Life,  Degrees Monday, November 9, 2009
  38. 38. Content MIT  OpenCourseWare,  Wikipedia,   Flat  World  Knowledge,  etc. Monday, November 9, 2009
  39. 39. Research Public  Library  of  Science,  Arxiv.org,   Google  Scholar,  etc. Monday, November 9, 2009
  40. 40. Support  Services ChaCha,  Yahoo!  Answers,   RateMyProfessor,  Email,  Instant   Messaging,  Twiler,  etc. Monday, November 9, 2009
  41. 41. Social  Life Facebook,  MySpace,  MMOG, iPhone  loca*on-­‐aware  apps,  etc. Monday, November 9, 2009
  42. 42. Degrees MCSE,  RHCE,  CCNA Monday, November 9, 2009
  43. 43. The  Monopoly  Is  Being  Busted Everything  we  provide  is  now  offered   by  someone  else Monday, November 9, 2009
  44. 44. When  Ins*tu*ons  Specialize They  usually  provide  beler  quality   at  a  beler  price Monday, November 9, 2009
  45. 45. Higher  Ed? Already  men*oned  cost How’s  our  quality? Monday, November 9, 2009
  46. 46. Monday, November 9, 2009
  47. 47. Industries  Failing  Everywhere Banks,  Insurance,  Automobiles Higher  Educa*on? Monday, November 9, 2009
  48. 48. A  Bail  Out  for  Higher  Ed? More  like  double-­‐digit  budget  cuts Monday, November 9, 2009
  49. 49. No,  No,  No No  feeling  of  relevance No  monopoly  posi*on No  bail  out  coming Monday, November 9, 2009
  50. 50. Quintessen*al  Crisis We  can’t  muster  sufficient  capacity, many  who  need  us  most  can’t  afford  us, and  our  budgets  are  being  slashed. Monday, November 9, 2009
  51. 51. Ignoring  the  Problem  is  Not  a  Strategy Christensen’s  Crucial  Conversa,ons Monday, November 9, 2009
  52. 52. The  20th  century  was  a  *me  of   technological  innova*on;   the  21st  century  must  be  a  *me  of   ins,tu,onal  innova*on. Monday, November 9, 2009
  53. 53. Technology  Gap Technology  use  in  higher  educa*on   and  the  real  world Monday, November 9, 2009
  54. 54. Ader  applying  for  admission  to  the  university,   registering  for  classes,  and  paying  tui*on,  Jay   makes  his  way  into  a  large,  stadium  sea*ng-­‐ style  room.  Talking  during  the  lecture  is   forbidden  and  the  professor  has  a  strict  “lids   down”  policy  to  help  students  focus  on  the   class.  Having  read  his  textbook  and  reviewed   the  assigned  handouts,  Jay  joins  150  other   students  in  listening  to  a  50-­‐minute  lecture. Analog,  tethered,  isolated,   generic,  consuming,  closed Monday, November 9, 2009
  55. 55. From  his  dorm  room,  a  cafe,  and  a  bus,  Jay   connects  to  the  Internet  via  his  laptop  and   searches  Google  for  informa*on  relevant  to   tomorrow’s  test.  Temporarily  stymied,  he  chats   with  friends  on  the  phone  to  see  if  they  can  assist   in  his  search.  Finding  a  good  source,  he  follows   links  to  explore  related  informa*on,  ignoring   irrelevant  material.  Later  that  evening  at  study   group  Jay  shares  his  find  with  friends. Digital,  mobile,  connected,   personal,  contribu*ng,  open Monday, November 9, 2009
  56. 56. Technology  Integrated  in  Courses? 74%  of  faculty  say  yes 62%  of  students  say  no Monday, November 9, 2009
  57. 57. Administra*ve  Efficiency Streamlined  applica*on,  registra*on,   handout  distribu*on,  homework  submission Monday, November 9, 2009
  58. 58. No  Improvement  of  Core  Business Teaching  and  Learning Monday, November 9, 2009
  59. 59. Improving  Core  Business Amazon’s  recommended  books Grocery  store’s  personalized  coupons Monday, November 9, 2009
  60. 60. What  About  E-­‐learning? Monday, November 9, 2009
  61. 61. What  About  E-­‐learning? Quite  innova*ve  in  1995! Monday, November 9, 2009
  62. 62. Characteris/cs  of  E-­‐learning Analog or Digital Tethered or Mobile Isolated or Connected Generic or Personal Consuming or Contribu*ng Closed or Open Monday, November 9, 2009
  63. 63. Openness  is  the  Cornerstone Openness  underpins  everything  interes*ng   happening  online  and  is  “what  they  expect” Monday, November 9, 2009
  64. 64. Why  Make  Such  a  Claim? Let’s  ask  Alexa  what  the  50  most   popular  sites  on  the  web  are… Monday, November 9, 2009
  65. 65. Sites  Where  Anyone  Can... Share  a  video,  share  a  photo,  share  a  blog  post,   share  their  personal  info,  share  their  ra*ngs,   share  their  files,  share  their  exper*se   Monday, November 9, 2009
  66. 66. Characteris/cs  of  E-­‐learning Analog or Digital Tethered or Mobile Isolated or Connected Generic or Personal Consuming or Contribu*ng Closed or Open Monday, November 9, 2009
  67. 67. Connec*ng You  can’t  connect  to  something  if  you   don’t  have  access  to  it Monday, November 9, 2009
  68. 68. Personalizing You  can’t  adapt  or  localize  something if  you  don’t  have  the  rights  to  modify  it Monday, November 9, 2009
  69. 69. Contribu*ng You  can’t  contribute  if  there’s   no  outlet  for  your  work Monday, November 9, 2009
  70. 70. What  Does  Openness  Mean  for  HE? Monday, November 9, 2009
  71. 71. The  Open  Access  Movement Providing  access  to  the  research   created  at  the  university Monday, November 9, 2009
  72. 72. The  Open  Educa*on  Movement Providing  access  to  the  teaching  and   learning  materials  created  at  the  university Monday, November 9, 2009
  73. 73. Monday, November 9, 2009
  74. 74. 74 Monday, November 9, 2009
  75. 75. 75 Monday, November 9, 2009
  76. 76. Monday, November 9, 2009
  77. 77. 77 Monday, November 9, 2009
  78. 78. 78 Monday, November 9, 2009
  79. 79. 79 Monday, November 9, 2009
  80. 80. 80 Monday, November 9, 2009
  81. 81. Monday, November 9, 2009
  82. 82. These  Are  Bolt-­‐Ons Not  radical  innova*ons with  openness  as  a  core  value Monday, November 9, 2009
  83. 83. The  20th  century  was  a  *me  of   technological  innova*on;   the  21st  century  must  be  a  *me  of   ins,tu,onal  innova*on. Monday, November 9, 2009
  84. 84. Monday, November 9, 2009
  85. 85. Monday, November 9, 2009
  86. 86. We’ve  Moved  Beyond  the  Garage Ins*tu*onal  innova*on  is  infinitely   more  difficult  than  technical  innova*on Monday, November 9, 2009
  87. 87. E.g.,  Stakeholders Is  innova*on  by  commilee  possible? Monday, November 9, 2009
  88. 88. E.g.,  Accredita*on How  innova*ve  can  you  be  without   sacrificing  accredita*on? Monday, November 9, 2009
  89. 89. Would  You  Rather  Be... Accredited  and  out  of  business? Unaccredited  and  s*ll  in  business? Monday, November 9, 2009
  90. 90. Ins*tu*ons  are  Designed  En**es Not  naturally  occurring  en**es Monday, November 9, 2009
  91. 91. Design “Purposive  choice  under  constraint” Monday, November 9, 2009
  92. 92. Constraints Are  at  least  as  different  a6er  the  Internet as  they  were  a6er  Gutenberg Monday, November 9, 2009
  93. 93. E.g.,  From  Cheap  to  Free Gutenberg  made  copies  cheap,   but  the  Internet  made  them  nonrivalrous Monday, November 9, 2009
  94. 94. Previous vs Current Analog ⇒ Digital Tethered ⇒ Mobile Isolated ⇒ Connected Generic ⇒ Personal Consuming ⇒ Contribu*ng Closed ⇒ Open Monday, November 9, 2009
  95. 95. New  Constraints  Require  New  Designs Not  post  hoc,  bolted-­‐on  fixes Monday, November 9, 2009
  96. 96. Food  for  Thought  1 Western  Governor’s  University Monday, November 9, 2009
  97. 97. Dynamic  Specializa*on Hagel  and  Brown Monday, November 9, 2009
  98. 98. Food  for  Thought  2 Open  University  of  the  Netherlands Monday, November 9, 2009
  99. 99. The  EMO An  intriguing  lifelong  learning  model Monday, November 9, 2009
  100. 100. Food  for  Thought  3 University  of  the  People Monday, November 9, 2009
  101. 101. Give  Away  the  Razor,  Sell  the  Blades Raymond’s  The  Magic  Cauldron Monday, November 9, 2009
  102. 102. Food  for  Thought  4 The  Open  High  School  of  Utah Monday, November 9, 2009
  103. 103. Data-­‐Driven  Teaching Real-­‐*me  pedagogy  via  dashboards Monday, November 9, 2009
  104. 104. OER  for  Con*nuous  Improvement Local  control  means  rapid  gains   Monday, November 9, 2009
  105. 105. Food  for  Thought  5 Bologna  Process  and  the European  Higher  Educa*on  Area Monday, November 9, 2009
  106. 106. A  la  Carte  Degrees Why  not  take  math  at  MIT,  physics  at   Berkeley,  law  at  Stanford,  classics  at   Chicago,  New  Testament  at  BYU,  etc.,   and  call  it  a  degree? Monday, November 9, 2009
  107. 107. Food  for  Thought  6 Land-­‐grant  University  2.0 (Hint:  it  would  include  openness) Monday, November 9, 2009
  108. 108. Food  for  Thought  7 Morrill  Act  III (Hint:  it  would  include  openness) Monday, November 9, 2009
  109. 109. The  20th  century  was  a  *me  of   technological  innova*on;   the  21st  century  must  be  a  *me  of   ins,tu,onal  innova*on. Monday, November 9, 2009
  110. 110. Only  You  (Policymakers)  Can  Innovate You  can’t  wait  for  two  guys  in  a  garage   to  fix  higher  educa*on’s  problems Monday, November 9, 2009
  111. 111. You  Must  Become  Conversant The  affordances  of  the  Internet  cannot   remain  the  exclusive  province  of  gearheads Monday, November 9, 2009
  112. 112. The  Technology  Exists (The  technology  caused  the  change   in  our  constraints  /  context!)   Monday, November 9, 2009
  113. 113. Is  the  Will  to  Innovate  There? There  will  be  very  real  costs (either  way) Monday, November 9, 2009
  114. 114. “It  is  not  necessary  to  change.   Survival  is  not  mandatory.” W.  E.  Deming Monday, November 9, 2009
  115. 115. Thank  You david.wiley@byu.edu hlp://davidwiley.org/ Monday, November 9, 2009

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