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Smarting the Dumb Pipes
 

Smarting the Dumb Pipes

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Ross Turk gave this keynote talk at Gluecon 2010 in Denver, Colorado.

Ross Turk gave this keynote talk at Gluecon 2010 in Denver, Colorado.

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    Smarting the Dumb Pipes Smarting the Dumb Pipes Presentation Transcript

    • les seaux stupide Oh, sorry, I work for a french company now. We are required to prepare our presentations in english poignées de porte de réseau and french...it’s kind of a new experience for me - pour une dactylo sueur like being in Canada! Wednesday, May 26, 2010
    • smarting the dumb pipes network services for developers This is the story of how we’re applying the lessons of an open ecosystem to a closed one. Wednesday, May 26, 2010
    • main() { main() { for(;;) { puts “hello, world!”; puts “hello, world!”; } } } #include <stdio.h> #include <stdio.h> main() { main() { for(;;) { for(;;) { printf ("hello, world!n"); printf ("hello, world!n"); printf ("I like you.n"); } } } } I worked at SourceForge for all of the last decade, where my job was to make sure people could share technology and make it better. Now I work in telecommunications. Wednesday, May 26, 2010
    • I’ve gone from working in the most open ecosystem in the world to one of the most tightly controlled. Wednesday, May 26, 2010
    • the network You may wonder what we’re doing here. We haven’t exactly done a good job so far of “working” with modern developers. Wednesday, May 26, 2010
    • This is Alcatel-Lucent’s US headquarters. Raise your hand if you know what we do. Nobody? Really? Oh, well let me tell you. Wednesday, May 26, 2010
    • Central Serving Regional Offices Office Transport VoIP Soft Phone 7342 ONT Indoor DH Residential Up to 64 1692 CP Gateway MSE GPON Splitters DHCP ONTs per PON Line GX 550 Ethernet, HomePNA Multiservices or MoCA GPON Metropolis® DMXtend Switch IPTV Access Multiplexer Set Top Box 7342 ONT 7342 OLT POTS Distribution Analog Phone Cabinet 1692 Sealed Expansion MSE Active 1696 Module 1692 WDM MS OPS Active Access Point DWDM IP Services Router 1692 OPS Access Point IP Services Router 7330 This is what we do. We sell FTTN GR303 things that let companies Access Point MDU TR008 build and run the net works IP Services Router Remote Expansion V5.2 Module Gateway you use every day. TDM Switch This graph is an example our marketing standards team Metropolis® DMXpress Metropolis® uses to teach us how to make Access Multiplexer DMXtend Access Multiplexer neat and legible graphs. Everything we do is complex. Wednesday, May 26, 2010
    • And it has to be complex, because one day it’s going to be bolted into somebody’s rack... Wednesday, May 26, 2010
    • ...or buried underground... Wednesday, May 26, 2010
    • ...or left at the bottom of the sea. Wednesday, May 26, 2010
    • Most developers (and users) see the net work as something they put packets into and receive packets from. unspeakably huge, complex, mysterious, packets stuffy network packets thing that nobody understands Wednesday, May 26, 2010
    • That’s where the phrase comes from. Developers just want the net work to do one thing: be a reliable pipe to put data through. the “dumb pipe” Wednesday, May 26, 2010
    • And why not? We all expect things in our everyday life to behave as if they’re simple when they’re anything but. When I’m at home and I want to discard a liquid of some sort, I pour it in the drain. Wednesday, May 26, 2010
    • When I want water, I get it from the faucet. I don’t know where my waste water goes or where my fresh water comes from, I just trust that it will work. The pipes in my house are truly “dumb” to me. Or, maybe, I’m dumb to them. Wednesday, May 26, 2010
    • This makes the net works feel kind of bad because, well, nobody likes to be taken for granted. What? You don’t feel sorry for them? Let’s all say “ awwww”. To be fair, the net works have been taking us for granted a little bit too. There’s another, better, reason why this is a problem. Wednesday, May 26, 2010
    • The bigger problem is that the situation is financially untenable. Pricing the net work as a cheap commodity hasn’t been working very well. Services have driven way more demand than anybody expected, or have designed the current business model around. Something new has to be done, or we may see drastic changes to the net as we know it: the end of flat-rate ser vice or more and more dropped calls). revenue per user network demand industry awesomeness (disclaimer: this data is complete bs, i made it up to illustrate the point) Wednesday, May 26, 2010
    • user context preferences, contacts, device, location content storage, distribution, transcoding communications The net works have the potential to be more than just a commodity, though - they can offer call control, messaging a lot of capabilities that developers can’t get anywhere else. accounting payments, authentication, history Wednesday, May 26, 2010
    • Raise your hand if you’ve had a good experience ...? partnering with a carrier and developing against these ser vices. Nobody? Really? Wow! Central Serving Regional Offices Office Transport VoIP Soft Phone 7342 ONT Indoor DH Residential 1692 CP Gateway Up to 64 GPON Splitters MSE DHCP ONTs per PON Line GX 550 Ethernet, HomePNA Multiservices or MoCA GPON Metropolis® DMXtend Switch IPTV Access Multiplexer Set Top Box 7342 ONT 7342 OLT POTS Distribution Analog Phone Cabinet 1692 Sealed Expansion MSE Active 1696 Module 1692 WDM MS OPS Active Access Point DWDM IP Services Router 1692 OPS Access Point IP Services Router 7330 FTTN GR303 Access Point MDU TR008 IP Services Router Remote Expansion V5.2 Module Gateway TDM Switch Metropolis® DMXpress Metropolis® Access Multiplexer DMXtend Access Multiplexer Wednesday, May 26, 2010
    • Here’s what’s happened instead: people have found a way around. Developers figured out how to do a lot of this stuff, while only relying on the net work to send and receive packets. This has generally been very successful, but I think that the net work can play a much larger part than that. Wednesday, May 26, 2010
    • In order for a developer to access these capabilities without needing a partnership with a carrier and a full understanding of st net work internals, they need to be exposed using re web services. network enablers esperanto ims sandwich parlay Central Serving Regional Offices Office Transport VoIP Soft Phone 7342 ONT Indoor DH Residential Up to 64 1692 CP Gateway MSE GPON Splitters DHCP ONTs per PON Line GX 550 Ethernet, HomePNA Multiservices or MoCA GPON Metropolis® DMXtend Switch IPTV Access Multiplexer Set Top Box 7342 ONT 7342 OLT POTS Distribution Analog Phone Cabinet 1692 Sealed Expansion MSE Active 1696 Module 1692 WDM MS OPS Active Access Point DWDM IP Services Router 1692 OPS Access Point IP Services Router 7330 FTTN GR303 Access Point MDU TR008 IP Services Router Remote Expansion V5.2 Module Gateway TDM Switch Metropolis® DMXpress Metropolis® Access Multiplexer DMXtend Access Multiplexer Wednesday, May 26, 2010
    • A large benefit of exposing these capabilities through web services is that they aren’t just available to the cable router, set-top box, or mobile device that connects you to the net work...they’re available to applications that run anywhere. Wednesday, May 26, 2010
    • The problem with net work ... ? providers opening up APIs to developers is that there are so many of them. Over 700. Partnering with a single carrier is hard, who wants to partner with 700? enablers network provider 3 provider 2 provider Wednesday, May 26, 2010
    • What the industry needs is a centralized place for developers to code against that knows which net work to pass the request along to. We’re in a good position to do this because we’re close to the net works without actually being one of them. unified network API enablers enablers enablers provider 1 provider 2 provider 3 Wednesday, May 26, 2010
    • But wait - we were talking about money. How does any of this fix the carrier business model? Wednesday, May 26, 2010
    • Some net works charge developers per-call for access to their services, costing as much as five cents/call for the most expensive ones. location: $0.045/call sms: $0.035/call Wednesday, May 26, 2010
    • sms 300,000/day advertising 500,000/day (eCPM of $2) Let’s say, for example, you built an application using SMS and advertising, and you were able to get enough users to send 300k SMSs every day and show 500k ad impressions. Wednesday, May 26, 2010
    • sms + advertising revenue: $1,000/day sms cost: ($10,500)/day net: ($9,500)/day By paying for SMS messages on a per-call basis, you could possibly lose a substantial amount of money...and, worse, it doesn’t scale. Wednesday, May 26, 2010
    • API pricing models that charge up-front fees for developers can make it really hard to get your business off the ground. Wednesday, May 26, 2010
    • This may be a bit of a departure, but I will come back around: Some things go really well together, like chocolate and peanut butter, strawberries and cream, mayonnaise and french fries, cocaine and baking soda. + I think the same thing holds true for net work capabilities and other technology. + + sms + advertising location + billing Wednesday, May 26, 2010
    • Instead of charging per call, developers can use bundled APIs to share their revenues with API and net work providers. If these providers give you something of value, and you’re successful enough to make money, they get paid. $700 That’s what we’re working on. $125 developer ad provider $75 sms provider network provider $70 overhead $30 Wednesday, May 26, 2010
    • sms + advertising revenue: $1,000/day to providers: ($300)/day net: $700/day Using a bundled API, our example app begins to generate revenue. Wednesday, May 26, 2010
    • This is hard. Really hard. Not only do we need to prove that the business model works, but we need to build the APIs and convince the carriers to turn them on. This might take a while, even though we’re being super aggressive. Wednesday, May 26, 2010
    • If you have an API that you think might pair up with a capability from the net work to make something interesting, email this guy. He’s sitting right over there. redg wants your api really bad redg.snodgrass@alcatel-lucent.com 415-254-7921 Wednesday, May 26, 2010
    • We have APIs in our lab that you can play around with. Although only one carrier is on-board now, we’re in talks with lots of carriers to expand the program. http://openapiservice.com Wednesday, May 26, 2010
    • What net work API would you use in your app if we were to launch it tomorrow? What capabilities have we not thought of? what APIs should the network expose? ross.turk@alcatel-lucent.com 310-498-0797 Wednesday, May 26, 2010