Digital game-based learning once removed:Teaching teachers<br />Adviser: Chiung-huiChiu<br />Presenter:Tzu-yuan Hsu<br />W...
Introduction<br />According to a recent study (Becker & Jacobsen, 2005), approximately half of the teachers surveyed would...
Related work<br />Teachers still use computers primarily for administrative tasks rather than teaching.<br />Computer proc...
What do teachers need to know about games?<br />Teachers often lack the skills and knowledge to integrate technology effec...
What do teachers need to know about games?<br />Teachers must also be capable of assessing these games and reviews themsel...
Course design<br />Teachers cannot be expected to embrace digital games as tools for learning without confidence in their ...
Course design<br />The project allowed for a choice between one of two main themes:<br />(1) Design a game to be used in a...
Course design<br />In addition to the readings and discussions, various games were examined, demonstrated and discussed in...
Post-mortem<br />Class participants who play games for entertainment found that they began to look at games in a new light...
Conclusions<br />Professional Development offerings are desperately needed, as ways to provide basic games literacy as wel...
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Digital Game Based Learning Once Removed Teaching Teachers

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Digital Game Based Learning Once Removed Teaching Teachers

  1. 1. Digital game-based learning once removed:Teaching teachers<br />Adviser: Chiung-huiChiu<br />Presenter:Tzu-yuan Hsu<br />Wen-yi Liu<br />Becker, K. (2007). Digital game-based learning once removed: Teaching teachers. British Journal of Educational Technology, 38(3):478-488.<br />2009/10/28<br />
  2. 2. Introduction<br />According to a recent study (Becker & Jacobsen, 2005), approximately half of the teachers surveyed would be interested in trying games and simulations in class.<br />Although interest seems high, there are significant genuine barriers to adoption, which include a lack of resources (time and equipment) as well as a lack of understanding of how to use games.<br />Teachers need resources that are readily available.<br />
  3. 3. Related work<br />Teachers still use computers primarily for administrative tasks rather than teaching.<br />Computer processor, memory speeds, and storage capacities continue to grow by leaps and bounds.<br />Games have the potential to offer an inquiry-based, constructivist approach that allows learners to engage with the material in an authentic, yet safe environment.<br />
  4. 4. What do teachers need to know about games?<br />Teachers often lack the skills and knowledge to integrate technology effectively into their classrooms.<br />Some teachers will resist all attempts to alter their opinions about the use of games as learning technologies, and individual opinions must be respected, but if the attitude one holds is the result of insufficient information, then providing that information can only help.<br />It is important for teachers to be able to address the inevitable concerns of parents and administrators when the prospect of playing games.<br />
  5. 5. What do teachers need to know about games?<br />Teachers must also be capable of assessing these games and reviews themselves.<br />Evaluating an application for suitability is time consuming, so we must consider ways that educators can use to share their evaluations easily.<br />There are several advocates and researchers who are doing this now (Kirriemuir, 2006; McFarlane, Sparrowhawk & Heald,2002; Prensky, 2006), and it is expected that more will be created.<br />
  6. 6. Course design<br />Teachers cannot be expected to embrace digital games as tools for learning without confidence in their own ability to use games effectively to enhance learning, or without a sound understanding of the games’ potential as well as their limitations.<br />In the spring of 2005, the author designed and taught a graduate-level course on DGBL intended primarily for teachers.<br />The course was designed as an introduction to digital games and gaming for instruction and learning.<br />
  7. 7. Course design<br />The project allowed for a choice between one of two main themes:<br />(1) Design a game to be used in a learning situation, complete with a high-concept design and a prototype of the learning game.<br />(2) Design a learning situation or instructional intervention that makes use of a COTS or other existing game, including lead-up activities, gameplay with goals and debriefing.<br />
  8. 8. Course design<br />In addition to the readings and discussions, various games were examined, demonstrated and discussed in each class.<br />Playing the games was a key feature of the course design.<br />Both a commonly cited obstacle to technology adoption and a real consideration is the problem of school resources.<br />The majority of the ‘purely’ commercial games that were examined were used as examples to help the participants achieve game literacy and were used to illustrate some of what is possible in game environments.<br />
  9. 9. Post-mortem<br />Class participants who play games for entertainment found that they began to look at games in a new light as the course progressed.<br />Traditional lecturing approaches require passivity and acceptance, but games are fundamentally dependant on the concept of agency.<br />By the end of the course, all participants were ‘converts’—especially those who were least convinced at the start.<br />
  10. 10. Conclusions<br />Professional Development offerings are desperately needed, as ways to provide basic games literacy as well as ways to help develop teachers who can add this new medium to their repertoire.<br />It is absolutely essential that teachers be allowed and encouraged to play games. — to be able to assess whether a specific game might be useful for them in the classroom, and, if so, under which conditions.<br />In the future, educational technologists will be able to specialize in digital games design and development just as they do now in distance learning.<br />

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