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Managing Difficult Behaviour

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  • 1. Leading Staff & Managing Unsatisfactory Performance Understand the origins and the scope of employee rights and management rights. Explain why there must be a balance management’s rights and employees’ rights when designing employment policies. Understand the relationship between employer / employee and distinguish it from employment at will. Distinguish between progressive discipline procedures and positive discipline procedures. Managing Discipline
  • 2. Apply fair standards to a case of staff misconduct and justify the use of discipline. Manage difficult people who challenge their leaders with such problems as poor attendance, low performance, insubordination, and substance abuse. Avoid disciplinary actions by taking a proactive and strategic approach to managing your staff . Managing Discipline
  • 3. The performance problems have been documented and have been brought to the attention of the employee The employee has been given the opportunity to improve, and After a reasonable period of time, the problems have not been rectified. Management Rights Performance as Cause
  • 4.
    • Principals influence the school’s climate of fairness and ethical by the tone they set for employees They should:
    • Take actions that develop trust
    • Act consistently
    • Be truthful
    • Demonstrate integrity
    • Communicate rules and performance criteria
    • Document the facts
    • Consistent response to underperformance
    Fair Treatment
  • 5. Examples of Difficult Behaviour
    • Examples of Difficult Behaviour
    • Aggressive/abusive behaviour
    • Disruptive behaviour
    • Bored, apathetic and disinterested
    • Strange/bizarre behaviour
    • Non-attendance
    • Non Compliance
    • Scapegoating/victimisation
    • Lack of personal hygiene
    • Personality conflicts - Which aspects?
    Specific issues - things about this behaviour that make it difficult for me to manage: 1. ……………………………….. 2. ……………………………….. 3. ……………………………….. 1.0 Key issue Need to clarify what specifically about the behaviour is difficult for you to manage.
  • 6. Potential Reasons for Behaviour
    • Underlying Causes of
    • Difficult Behaviour
    • Don’t want to be there
    • Disability/health problems, eg. brain injury, psych illness, diabetes
    • Emotionally upset eg. Sad, angry, grieving
    • Inappropriate social skills, eg. Different culture, low self-awareness
    • Low self-esteem
    • Just having a bad day
    2.0 Are you aware of any issues this person is currently facing? 1. ……………………………….. 2. ……………………………….. 3. ………………………………..
  • 7. Recognising your own responses
    • Our Emotional Baggage
    • Early life experience
    • - Unresolved anger, grief and loss
    • - Our own prejudices
    • Personality style
    • Professional insecurities
    • Work stress
    • Home pressures and concerns
    • Just having a bad day
    By completing the exercise below, you can gain some insight into your sensitivities and begin to rationalise them so they don’t interfere with your relationships with others. The recipe is as follows: When someone is ________________, I feel __________________ and I respond by ____________________________. Do this specifically for the persons who’s behaviour you are struggling with. Complete the sentences after inserting the appropriate word. Eg.: When someone is criticising me, I feel hurt and picked-on and I respond by sulking and not talking to them. (words could include rude, unhappy, silent, upset sad, angry, depressed etc.) After completing the statements examine the irrational beliefs (see Popular Irrational Beliefs) behind them and begin to consciously reject and challenge them whenever you find yourself in a particular situations. 3.1 Undoing your buttons….. Our reactions to emotions displayed by others can reveal a great deal about our own sensitivities. These sensitivities, otherwise known as buttons, hot spots, triggers or Achilles heel, cause us to respond ineffectively to certain people and situations.
  • 8. Popular Irrational Beliefs
  • 9. Recognising your own responses - The person you have most control over is you!
    • Managing Yourself
    • Know your buttons or triggers
    • Refer on
    • Recognise you’re aroused/upset
    • Consciously calm and relax yourself
    • Take time to choose your response
    • Get another perspective and/or debrief
    • Deal with your feelings
    • Get over it!
    My Current Response patterns that are helpful: 1. ………………… 2. ……………… 3. ……………… 4. ……………… My Current Response patterns that are unhelpful: 1. ………………… 2. ……………… 3. ……………… 4. ……………… 3.2 You are most responsible for managing yourself. Once you are aware of your patterns of responding to your ‘difficult behaviour person’, decide which patterns are helpful and which are not .
  • 10. Prevention and Early Intervention
    • Prevention
    • Accept that it is OK to express feelings
    • Listen to and acknowledge your staff’s feelings and concerns
    • Behaviour observation
    • Be consistent in applying rules and boundaries
    • Re-assess, update
    • Reward positive behaviour and ignore non-damaging negative
    • Model appropriate behaviour
  • 11. Initial Techniques for Responding to Difficult Behaviour
    • Don’t add to the angst; stay calm, be discreet
    • Ignore negative, non-damaging behaviour
    • Communicate your concern clearly. Acknowledge the person’s feelings.
    • Refer back to contracts made earlier
    • Don’t issue ultimatums
    • Assess the impact on others. Seek advice if necessary .
    Identify your common initial reaction. What one thing do you do well? What one thing would you like to change? Do Well 1. ………………… Like to Change 1. ………………… Good Communications Skills Developing these skills is vital in controlling difficult situations, calming people down, and building trust and respect. Do not underestimated the power of non verbal communication - face the person, look them in the eyes, appropriate body posture, voice tone and facial expression. MOST communication occurs through these skills! Use active listening FIRST and then throughout - repeat their concern to make sure you understand. Clarify. Ask for more information. Apologise for the situation and state you want to help. Explain options available and summarise actions to be taken - yours and theirs. Avoid fight starters eg. but, always, never, you End pleasantly if possible.
  • 12. Self care issues and other support available
    • Recognise the effect an interaction has on you
    • Allow yourself recovery time
    • Be aware of things that help you to recover effectively and quickly
    • Be available to support others who may have been through a difficult interaction where possible
    • Access other helping agencies/support available to you
      • staff counselling
      • Regional support
    Develop your self awareness by listing the ways that dealing with difficult behaviour affects you: Physically………………...………. Emotionally…………………...….. Behaviourally…………………….. Ways to care for yourself: 1. 2. 3. 7.1 Dealing with difficult behaviour can be emotionally tiring. Caring for yourself during this time is vital to the effective management of the situation.
  • 13. A Summary Master Plan
  • 14.
    • Failure to deal honestly and fairly with difficult employees
    • Confronting an employee about problems is uncomfortable.
    • Many leaders simply do nothing.
    • “ Failure to act” is fundamentally unfair to the employee and the employer.
    • What’s A Manager To Do?
    • Get Help: Ask a colleague in your cluster or region for advice
    • The regional Office is responsible for you and the Department is responsible for you. Have an objective person review the proposed action --
    FAILING TO ADDRESS PROBLEMS
  • 15. Communicate Concerns : Use the “3 F’s” - fair, forthright and firm - Fair - (1) how he/she has treated other employees for similar infractions (2) whether the employee understood your expectations and the consequences for failing to meet them (3) whether there are extenuating circumstances which might explain the behavior (4) whether the employee has any past discipline issue. Forthright – Ensure that the employee is notified of your real concerns . Firm – Ensure that employee understands that changes must be made.

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