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User generated content and citizen journalism

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Lecture on UGC and CJ delivered to year 2 students on the journalism degree at Birmingham City University, UK

Lecture on UGC and CJ delivered to year 2 students on the journalism degree at Birmingham City University, UK

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  • 1. Paul Bradshaw Senior Lecturer, Online Journalism, Magazines and New Media, School of Media, Birmingham City University, UK (mediacourses.com) Blogger, Online Journalism Blog User Generated Content and Citizen Journalism
  • 2. Don’t talk to me about Citizen Journalism.
  • 3. Don’t talk to me about UGC.
  • 4. Talk to me about Community.
  • 5. Joe Public
  • 6. + Joe Public Shiny thing
  • 7. + Joe Public Shiny thing =
  • 8. ?
  • 9. This is what news organisations want…
  • 10. … This is what news organisations get.
  • 11. =
  • 12.  
  • 13.  
  • 14. =
  • 15. now
  • 16. then
  • 17. then
  • 18. =
  • 19. =
  • 20. =
  • 21. =
  • 22. =
  • 23. =
  • 24. =
  • 25. =
  • 26. =
  • 27. Capturing ‘the mood’?
  • 28. “ The market is a conversation” http://www.cluetrain.com/
  • 29. Managing the community
  • 30. =
  • 31. The 1-9-90 rule http:// www.useit.com/alertbox/participation_inequality.html
  • 32. (you want to be in that 1%)
  • 33. Trolls http:// communitiesonline.homestead.com/dealingwithtrolls.html
  • 34. Why contribute? Why you?
  • 35. Passion (+ anger)
  • 36. Knowledge
  • 37. Social connection
  • 38. Money?
  • 39. Status?
  • 40. A voice?
  • 41. Training, help, exposure?
  • 42. Reciprocity
  • 43. Trust
  • 44. “ [W]hen the contaminated fuel incident happened a little while ago the BBC’s question on its website asking people to tell us where they bought their fuel if they had had a problem engine was the most accurate data any organisation in the country had about the location of the problem.
  • 45. “ Last year our defence correspondent Paul Wood became aware of widespread concern within the army about the condition of barracks. By using army websites and obtaining material from soldiers’ families he obtained pictures and information that painted a devastating picture of sub-standard accommodation.”
  • 46. “ Contributors posting on Twitter provided an earlier picture of the Barack Obama victory in the Iowa caucuses than any professionally organised exit poll or data collection. The potential for this sort of journalistic enterprise is only just being realised.”
  • 47. Peter Horrocks, head of BBC Newsroom http://blogs.pressgazette.co.uk/fleetstreet/2008/01/09/horrocks-only-1-per-cent-of-bbc-audience-contributes-ugc-value-apparent-only-when-filtered/
  • 48. Verify.
  • 49.
    • Never assume what you see/hear is true.
    • A journalist’s role is to guarantee credibility
    • Consider the source
    • Check IP address, etc.
    • See who links to it
    • Look for touching up, etc.
    • More: Quinn & Lamble (2008), Friend & Singer (2007), Web Search Garage etc.
  • 50. Legal.
  • 51. Libel Contempt of court
  • 52. ©
  • 53. Do something now
    • Identify an issue and think of a creative way to generate conversation around it in your online community/ies of choice. That might involve users and you:
      • Creating and sharing images
      • Posting tweets and retweeting them
      • Uploading images, video or audio
      • Contributing to forums
      • Joining groups and making pledges
      • Posting blog entries or adding comments
      • Voting in polls or completing surveys
      • Adding to or editing wikis
    • Key question: why do people pass things on? Why do they take part?
  • 54. Paul Bradshaw Senior Lecturer, Online Journalism, Magazines and New Media, School of Media, Birmingham City University, UK (mediacourses.com) Blogger, Online Journalism Blog [email_address]