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Types letters

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MBA/MMS sem 1

MBA/MMS sem 1

Published in: Education, Business

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Transcript

  • 1. Four Types of Business Letters For Business Writing
  • 2. Two Letter Techniques : Direct vs. Indirect
    • Best for:
    • Good news
    • Non-emotional issues
    • Audiences that prefer a straightforward approach
    • Best for:
    • Bad news
    • Less direct readers (some international)
    • Sensitive situations
    • Issues that need explaining
    • Introduction:
    • Establishes a reason for writing
    • Presents main idea
    • Introduction:
    • Acts as a buffer with a positive or neutral statement
    • Compliments the readers, agrees, appreciates, thanks, and more
    • Body:
    • Provides and explains details
    • Body:
    • Explains situation first
    • Leads up to the point/issue
    • States point/issue
    • If possible, links bad news with benefits
    • Does not place blame
    • Conclusion:
    • Reminds of any deadlines
    • Presents call for action
    • Looks to future
    • Conclusion:
    • Does not apologize
    • Gracious closing
  • 3. Tips For Business Letters
    • Think of them as mainly persuasive documents
    • Write a reader-orientated document not a writer-oriented document
    • Be respectful
  • 4. Inquiry Letters
    • Purpose: Ask for information
    • State clearly what information you are requesting and why
    • Write specific, concise, to the point questions that are both easy to understand and easy to answer
      • Use bullets to highlight the questions
      • Leave space for the readers to answer the questions
      • Attach a questionnaire if you have more than 5 questions
    • Specify when you need the answers by
    • Thank the reader
  • 5. Special Request Letters
    • Purpose: Make a special demand
    • State clearly who you are and why you are writing
    • Convince the reader to help
    • Show you are hard working
    • Discuss your reason for the request
    • Show you understand the situation and have done research
    • Discuss why the person you are writing to is the best person to help
    • Write specific, concise, to the point questions that are both easy to understand and easy to answer
      • Use bullets to highlight the questions
      • Leave space for the readers to answer the questions
      • Attach a questionnaire if you have more than 5 questions
    • Specify when you need the answers by
    • Thank the reader
    • Offer the reader a copy of the report or results
    • Ask for necessary permissions
  • 6. Sales Letters
    • Purpose: to persuade the readers to “buy” a product, service, idea, or point of view
    • Grab the reader’s attention
    • Highlight the product’s appeal
    • Show the product's use
    • Conclude with a request for action (buy it!)
    • Appeal to the reader with reader-centered issues (health, convenience, service, saving money…)
    • Use concrete words and colorful verbs
    • Be ethical and truthful
    • Don’t brag or go on
  • 7. Customer Relations Letters
    • Purpose: establish and maintain good relationships with the customers
    • Be diplomatic
    • Be persuasive
    • Write from and understand the reader’s perspective
    • There are several types…
  • 8. Claim Letters: A Type of Customer Relations Letter
    • Purpose: Express a complaint and request specific action (must have both)
    • Choose a direct or indirect approach
      • Direct is best for routine claim letters: claim is backed by guarantee, warrantee, contract, reputation, or more
      • Indirect is best for arguable claim letters: when the claim is debatable or unusual
    • Use a professional, rational, if possible positive, tone, and not a hostile, negative, and/or emotional tone
    • Clearly describe product or service with necessary details
    • Explain the problem with details
    • Propose a fair, precise, and appropriate request/adjustment
    • Present an explicit deadline
  • 9. Adjustment Letters: A Type of Customer Relations Letter
    • Purpose: Respond to claim letter with solution
    • Work to reconcile the situation and restore the customer's trust in your company
    • “Be prompt, courteous, and decisive”
    • Use a positive or neutral tone without being begrudging or taking full blame
    • Two types: “Yes” or “No”
  • 10. “ Yes” Adjustment Letters
    • Start with an apology and admit claim is justified
    • Quickly present favorable news
    • Specifically state how you are correcting the problem
    • Explain what happened and why
    • Conclude with a friendly, positive note
  • 11. “ No” Adjustment Letters
    • Use an indirect approach
    • “ Thank the customer for writing”
    • Restate the customer’s problem
    • Explain what happened and why without placing blame
    • Clearly state discussion without hedging
    • Link “no” to benefits
    • Conclude with concise gracious statement to (leave) open the door to future business
  • 12. There are the four types. Enjoy writing!