• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Media and Conflict Resolution
 

Media and Conflict Resolution

on

  • 538 views

Ilia State University, Tbilisi, Georgia

Ilia State University, Tbilisi, Georgia

Statistics

Views

Total Views
538
Views on SlideShare
472
Embed Views
66

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
3
Comments
0

1 Embed 66

https://twitter.com 66

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • {}

Media and Conflict Resolution Media and Conflict Resolution Presentation Transcript

  • Onnik James Krikorian Journalist, Photojournalist, Media Consultant and Trainer http://www.onnik-krikorian.com http://twitter.com/onewmphoto http://www.facebook.com/onewmphoto http://www.conflict-voices.net http:www.facebook.com/conflictvoices onewmphoto@gmail.com Ilia State University, Tbilisi, Georgia 16th October 2013
  • Media and Conflict Resolution “When war is declared, truth is the first casualty” Arthur Ponsonby, Falsehood in Wartime, 1928 Ilia State University, Tbilisi, Georgia 16th October 2013
  • Nagorno Karabakh • 1994 ceasefire • Approx 25,000 dead • Approx 1 million refugees and IDPs • 16 percent of Azerbaijan controlled by Armenian forces • Border skirmishes and clashes, increase in sniper incidents. Over 3,000 dead since 1994 ceasefire • New generations living without contact with the other side • Conflict a political tool in Armenia and Azerbaijan • Peace deal still elusive • Threat of new war Ilia State University, Tbilisi, Georgia 16th October 2013
  • Attitudes towards Resolution Ilia State University, Tbilisi, Georgia 16th October 2013
  • Trust in the Media Ilia State University, Tbilisi, Georgia 16th October 2013
  • Media Perpetuating Conflict? [...] people are often inclined to consider their existing attitudes and beliefs to be true and filter the news through this lens. Thus, they accept messages in order to maintain their original perceptions. […] bias in the local media [...] serves as a means to fuel and perpetuate hatred. This is a role the media has and continues to play with regards to the conflict over Nagorno Karabakh. Armenian and Azerbaijani International News Coverage – Empirical Findings and Recommendations for Improvement, Caucasus Resource Research Centers (CRRC) http://epfound.am/files/mb_fg_report_finalized_edited_12.27.2008.doc Ilia State University, Tbilisi, Georgia 16th October 2013
  • Media Perpetuating Conflict? [A] negative context [is set] in the public consciousness, which hinders dialogue and mutual understanding […] Without more accurate and unbiased information […] free of negative rhetoric and stereotypes, Armenians and Azerbaijanis will continue to see themselves as enemies without any common ground. Armenian and Azerbaijani International News Coverage – Empirical Findings and Recommendations for Improvement, Caucasus Resource Research Centers (CRRC) http://epfound.am/files/mb_fg_report_finalized_edited_12.27.2008.doc Ilia State University, Tbilisi, Georgia 16th October 2013
  • Attitudes in Armenia Ilia State University, Tbilisi, Georgia 16th October 2013
  • Attitudes in Azerbaijan Ilia State University, Tbilisi, Georgia 16th October 2013
  • Attitudes in Georgia Ilia State University, Tbilisi, Georgia 16th October 2013
  • Alternative Narratives Nowhere in the world can you find two groups of people closer to each other. That is why we often have these stupid disputes between Armenians and Azeris. "This house is Armenian" or "this house is Azeri." Or "this music is Armenian or Azeri." This is exactly because the two have so much in common. [...] I normally say, and people don't like this, that Armenians are just Christian Azeris and Azeris are just Muslim Armenians. That is how much they are alike. Seymur Baycan, Re-arming the Caucasus, Al Jazeera English http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cz47DkYn4Kk Ilia State University, Tbilisi, Georgia 16th October 2013
  • Alternative Narratives We hear far too little of what I call this “third narrative” of the Armenian-Azerbaijani conflict, a narrative of peace. It spins the idea that the two peoples are capable of getting along fine, have lived together in the past and, if politicians are able to overcome differences on the Karabakh conflict, can live together in the future. International mediators are too timid to speak this narrative or feel that it is not their business. The media in both countries suppresses it. Thomas de Waal, senior associate in the Russia and Eurasia Program at the Carnegie Endowment and author of Black Garden: Armenia and Azerbaijan through Peace and War http://conflict-voices.net /conflict_voices_may_2011.html Ilia State University, Tbilisi, Georgia 16th October 2013
  • Alternative Narratives Above: Azerbaijani Prisoner of War (PoW) Right: Azerbaijani PoW and Civilian Hostages Photos © Onnik Krikorian 1994 Ilia State University, Tbilisi, Georgia 16th October 2013
  • Alternative Narratives Ilia State University, Tbilisi, Georgia 16th October 2013
  • Another Alternative? Throughout history, war has affected media, with conflict often creating an information void. In the 21st century, media has begun to affect war more than ever before. Digital media technologies [...] have increased communication and information dissemination in conflict settings [...]. These new tools can be used to foment violence or to foster peace, and it is possible to build communication systems that encourage dialogue and nonviolent political solutions. Ivan Sigal, Global Voices Executive Director, Digital media in conflict-prone societies, Center for International Media Assistance (CIMA) http://cima.ned.org/publications/research-reports/digital-media-conflict-prone-societies Ilia State University, Tbilisi, Georgia 16th October 2013
  • Global Voices Global Voices is a community of more than 300 bloggers and translators around the world who work together to bring readers reports from blogs and citizen media everywhere, with an emphasis on voices that are not ordinarily heard in the mainstream media. Global Voices is translated into more than 30 languages by volunteer translators, who have formed the Lingua project. Additionally, Global Voices has an Advocacy website and network to help people speak out online in places where their voices are censored. We also have an outreach project called Rising Voices to help marginalized communities use citizen media to be heard. Technology for Transparency examines the use of online tools in increasing transparency and accountability globally. Ilia State University, Tbilisi, Georgia 16th October 2013
  • Russia-Georgia War Ilia State University, Tbilisi, Georgia 16th October 2013
  • Professional or Citizen Media? Anyone who believes that all citizen media are objective and impartial is either mad or hasn't actually read any citizen media. […] What's become very difficult is using citizen media to understand what's actually happening on the ground. As we all know, some of the reports from both camps in the South Ossetian conflict were likely manufactured and inaccurate. This sort of situation can get even more complicated when there aren't impartial journalists on the ground. Ethan Zuckerman, Global Voices co-founder http://www.eng.kavkaz-uzel.ru/articles/13149/ Ilia State University, Tbilisi, Georgia 16th October 2013
  • Social Media Crossing Borders Ilia State University, Tbilisi, Georgia 16th October 2013
  • http://conflict-voices.net Caucasus Conflict Voices Ilia State University, Tbilisi, Georgia 16th October 2013
  • Internet Use Armenia 2011 Media Public Opinion and Preference Survey, Caucasus Resource Research Centers (CRRC) Ilia State University, Tbilisi, Georgia 16th October 2013
  • Imaginary Cosmopolitanism I study the ways new media shapes people's perceptions of the world. It's my fond hope that social networks such as Facebook will help users broaden their perspectives by listening to a different set of people than they encounter in their daily life. But I fear services such as Facebook may be turning us into imaginary cosmopolitans. [...] Is Facebook a space for cross-cultural interaction? For fomenting reactionary hatred? Or is it primarily a space for online interaction with our local, offline friends? Ethan Zuckerman, Global Voices co-founder, Does Facebook unite us or divide us? http://edition.cnn.com/2010/OPINION/08/03/zuckerman.facebook.global/index.html Ilia State University, Tbilisi, Georgia 16th October 2013
  • Cyber Utopian or Skeptic? The reason why the KGB wants you to join Facebook is because it allows them to learn more about you from afar. It allows them to identify certain social graphs and social connections between activists. Many of these relationships are now self-disclosed by activists by joining various groups. Evgeny Morozov, author of The Net Delusion: The Dark Side of Internet Freedom http://www.rferl.org/content/interview_morozov_internet_democracy_promotion/2284105.html Ilia State University, Tbilisi, Georgia 16th October 2013
  • The Media and ICT4D? http://www.Elva.org Ilia State University, Tbilisi, Georgia 16th October 2013
  • Questions & Discussion […] the internet is not magic; it is a tool. Anyone who wants to use it to bring nations closer together has to show initiative, and be ready to travel physically as well as virtually. As with the telegraph before it—also hailed as a tool of peace — the internet does nothing on its own. The Economist, A cyber-house divided http://www.economist.com/node/16943885?story_id=16943885 Ilia State University, Tbilisi, Georgia 16th October 2013