What is the current state of food production in the region?
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What is the current state of food production in the region?

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  • Introduce the topic and its relevance to deepening our understanding of the goals, strategies, and actions.
  • Source: National Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), 2012Map by Travis NortonPrime farmland: 196,739 acres Definition:It has the combination of soil properties, growing season, and moisture supply needed to produce sustained high yields of crops in an economic manner if it is treated and managed according to acceptable farming methods.Farmland of statewide importance: 255, 919 acresDefinition: Generally, additional farmlands of statewide importance include those that are nearly prime farmland and that economically produce high yields of crops when treated and managed according to acceptable farming methods. Some may produce as high a yield as prime farmlands if conditions are favorable. In some states, additional farmlands of statewide importance may include tracts of land that have been designated for agriculture by state law.Prime farmland if drained: 333,306 acresDefinition: Soils considered feasible for improvement by draining, by irrigating, by removing stones, by removing salts or exchangeable sodium, or by protecting from overflow are classified according to their continuing limitations in use, or the risks of soil damage, or both, after the improvements have been installed.Not prime farmland: 207,019 acresDefinition: Land that, for a combination of environmental and land use reasons, is not suitable for farming.
  • Talk about how soil quality only tells part of the story – we’re really concerned with how that soil is being currently used.Also note that farming takes place on many different land use types, especially on residential land. Remember also to talk about vacant land as an opportunity for expanding farmland.
  • This map shows Prime Farmland, Prime Farmland if Drained, and Farmland of Statewide Importance that is currently developed in some manner other than for farming and is hence ‘lost’ for farming.
  • This map shows the location of ag land in 2012 identified from satellite imagery. This would be something good to look at while you
  • Source: USDA Census of Ag, 2007Map source: National Agricultural Statistics Service (NASS), USDA Cropland Data Layer, 2012Map by Travis Norton
  • Source: National Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), 2011Map by Travis NortonPrime farmland: 196,739 acres Definition:It has the combination of soil properties, growing season, and moisture supply needed to produce sustained high yields of crops in an economic manner if it is treated and managed according to acceptable farming methods.Farmland of statewide importance: 255, 919 acresDefinition: Generally, additional farmlands of statewide importance include those that are nearly prime farmland and that economically produce high yields of crops when treated and managed according to acceptable farming methods. Some may produce as high a yield as prime farmlands if conditions are favorable. In some states, additional farmlands of statewide importance may include tracts of land that have been designated for agriculture by state law.Prime farmland if drained: 333,306 acresDefinition: Soils considered feasible for improvement by draining, by irrigating, by removing stones, by removing salts or exchangeable sodium, or by protecting from overflow are classified according to their continuing limitations in use, or the risks of soil damage, or both, after the improvements have been installed.Not prime farmland: 207,019 acresDefinition: Land that, for a combination of environmental and land use reasons, is not suitable for farming.
  • Source: USDA ERS, 2012. Emissions data from 2010. Total carbon emissions: 6,822 million metric tons CO2
  • Source: USDA ERS, 2012. Emissions data from 2010. Total carbon emissions: 6,822 million metric tons CO2
  • Source: National Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), 2011Map by Travis NortonPrime farmland: 196,739 acres Definition:It has the combination of soil properties, growing season, and moisture supply needed to produce sustained high yields of crops in an economic manner if it is treated and managed according to acceptable farming methods.Farmland of statewide importance: 255, 919 acresDefinition: Generally, additional farmlands of statewide importance include those that are nearly prime farmland and that economically produce high yields of crops when treated and managed according to acceptable farming methods. Some may produce as high a yield as prime farmlands if conditions are favorable. In some states, additional farmlands of statewide importance may include tracts of land that have been designated for agriculture by state law.Prime farmland if drained: 333,306 acresDefinition: Soils considered feasible for improvement by draining, by irrigating, by removing stones, by removing salts or exchangeable sodium, or by protecting from overflow are classified according to their continuing limitations in use, or the risks of soil damage, or both, after the improvements have been installed.Not prime farmland: 207,019 acresDefinition: Land that, for a combination of environmental and land use reasons, is not suitable for farming.
  • Population: US Census 2010Income & Poverty: 2010 ACS 5-year estimatesChange 2000 – 2010: - 3% (decline by 34,602) People 1,135,509
  • Source: US Census of Agriculture, 2007 DEFINE AGRICULTUAL OPERATIONS
  • Source: US Census of Agriculture, 2007
  • Source: US Census of Agriculture, 2007
  • Source: US Census of Agriculture, 2007
  • Source: USDA ERS, 2012. Emissions data from 2010. Total carbon emissions: 6,822 million metric tons CO2Regional ag production increased between 2005 and 2010, but employment declined – greater mechanization, energy use by farms
  • Source: USDA ERS, 2012. Emissions data from 2010. Water Use data is from the USGS Water Use report 20051.09 billion gallons equivalent to using water from 1,655 Olympic sized swimming pools per dayTotal carbon emissions: 6,822 million metric tons CO2
  • Source: US Census of Agriculture, 2007
  • Source: US Census of Ag 2007
  • Source: US Census of Ag 2007
  • Source: US Census of Ag 2007
  • Source: US Census of Ag 2007
  • Source: New York State Agricultural Districts Mapping Program, Cornell University Geospatial Information Repository, 2012
  • Farmland protection plans address loss of farmland.
  • Farmland protection plans address loss of farmland.

What is the current state of food production in the region? Presentation Transcript

  • 1. What is the current state of foodproduction in the region?
  • 2. Digging deeper• Land• Farms & Farmers• Products
  • 3. LandSource: USDA Cropland Data Layer, 2012
  • 4. Land and soilPrimefarmland20%Farmland ofstatewideimportance26%Primefarmland ifdrained33%Not primefarmland21%Land resourcesSource: National Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), 2012
  • 5. LandPrime Farmland Uses Acres % of landResidential 69,712 35%Agricultural Land 54,921 28%Vacant 30,219 15%Commercial 5,811 3%Wild, Forested, ConservationLands And Public Parks3,740 2%Other 32,335 16%Total 196,739 100%Source: National Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), 2012,NYS Tax Assessor Parcel File, 2012
  • 6. Land214,097 acres offarm-quality soil iscurrentlydeveloped.Source: National ResourcesConservation Service (NRCS), 2012,USDA Cropland Layer, 2012
  • 7. LandSource: USDA Cropland Layer
  • 8. LandSource: USDA Census of Ag, 2007860,000880,000900,000920,000940,000960,000980,0001,000,0001,020,0001,040,000050,000100,000150,000200,000250,000300,000350,000400,0001978 1982 1987 1992 1997 2002 2007ThousandsAcres of FarmlandErie-Niagara U.S.Total land (acres)1,002,240Farmland (acres)2002: 309,788 (31%)2007: 291,992 (29%)Change 2002-2007:-17,796 acres
  • 9. Land47%23%20%9%1% 1%1 to 49.9 50 to 99.9 100 to259.9260 to999.91,000 to1,999.92,000 ormoreAcres operatedShare of Farms by Size (acres operated)Source: USDA Census of Ag, 2007
  • 10. LandSource: USDA ARS, 2012Averageextremetemperaturesincreased by5 degreesbetween1986 and2005Temperature1981-2010 Average (ºF)Growing DegreeDays (base 50 ºF)Erie County 48.5 2,667NiagaraCounty48.3 2,647
  • 11. Land• Temperature: could increase by 3F by 2020and 8F by 2080.• Precipitation: projected to increase by 15%in spring and 10% in summer.Source: NYSERDA ClimAID, 2011
  • 12. LandUrban Farming & Community Gardening• No comprehensive inventory of urbanfarming and community gardening in theregionGrassroots Gardens• 73 gardens on 135 lots• 78 lots are vacant city-owned parcelsGreenprint Niagara• Two gardens in Niagara FallsBarriers• Acquiring land and guaranteeing tenure• Marketing goods
  • 13. Farms & Farmers
  • 14. Farms & FarmersSource: USDA Census of Ag, 2007Farms 2002 2007 Change%changeBi-County Region 2,090 2,080 -10 0%Erie Cnty 1,289 1,215 -74 -6%Niagara Cnty 801 865 64 8%Farmers 2002 2007 Change%changeBi-County Region 3,192 3,252 60 2%Erie Cnty 1,978 1,898 -80 -4%Niagara Cnty 1,214 1,354 140 12%
  • 15. Farms & Farmers• Over 2/3 of farmers are 45 and over• 35 percent of farmers are women• 96 percent of farmers are white• 48 percent list farming as a secondaryoccupation0%3%14%27%28%28%Under 2525-3435-4445-5455-6465+AgeSource: USDA Census of Ag, 2007
  • 16. Farms & Farmers• 98 percent of ag land is owner-occupied• 2 percent is tenant occupied• 10 percent farmed by corporations• 25 percent farmed by partnerships• 65 percent farmed byfamilies, individuals, or otherorganizationsSource: USDA Census of Ag, 200765%10%25%Farm Type by Acres OperatedFamilies, individuals, orotherCorporationsPartnerships 85%7%8%Farm Type by Number of Farms
  • 17. Farms & Farmers• Over 25 percent of ag land is treatedwith herbicideSource: USDA Census of Ag, 2007Ag land treated with… Acres% of AgLandChemicalsFungicide 9716 3.3Herbicide 73553 25.2Insecticide 40899 14Other chemicals 4123 1.4Fertilizer 119036 40.8Manure 48509 16.6• 4909 acres of organic ag land with 22organic operations
  • 18. Farms & FarmersEnergy & EmissionsUsage:• Between 2000 and 2004, energyuse by ag producers in New YorkState rose 2 percent, while theaverage U.S. state saw a drop inenergy use by over 1 percent.• Food system energyconsumption ranking (most toleast):• Processing• Household use• Agriculture• Packaging, transport, foodservicesEmissions:• Ag accounts for 8% of allemissions in the U.S.8%34%30%27%1%U.S. GHG EmissionsAgricultureCommercial & ResidentialIndustryTransportationOtherSource: USDA ERS, 2012
  • 19. Farms & Farmers• 281 of 2,080 farms are irrigated• 1.09 billion gallons of public water drawn/day for alluses• 0.47%, or 5.09 million gallons/day, drawn foragriculture• Irrigation: 4.01 mg/d• Livestock: 1.04 mg/d• Aquaculture: 0.04 mg/dSource: USGS, 2005, USDA Census of Ag, 2007Source: Erie County Water Authority20.3%0.5%0.4%0.1%0.0%2.7%0.1%75.8%Public Water UsePublic SupplyDomestic (Self-supplied)IrrigationLivestockAqua-cultureIndustrialMiningThermoelectric
  • 20. Farms & FarmersRevenues(top 5)($1,000) %Expenditures(top 5)($1,000) %Total 239,856 100 Total 176,366 100Animal sales 118,297 49.3 Hired labor 33,615 19.06Crop sales 102,379 42.7 Animal feed 25,211 14.29Farm sources 9,974 4.2Supplies andrepairs19,207 10.89Government& insurancepayments4,779 2 Depreciation 17,676 10.02Patronage andco-ops1,809 0.8 Seeds and plants 10,358 5.87Source: USDA Census of Ag, 2007
  • 21. ProductsSource: USDA Census of Ag, 2007
  • 22. ProductsLand Acres %Total 1,002,240 100Cropland 212,211 21Harvested Cropland 173,217 100%Hay 58,627 34%Corn grain 31,233 18%Haylage 24,378 14%Corn silage 23,338 13%Soybeans 13,165 8%Oats 4,744 3%Wheat 3,579 2%Apple 3,187 2%Grape 2,945 2%Sweet corn 2,408 1%Other 5,613 3%Source: USDA Census of Ag, 2007
  • 23. ProductsSource: USDA Census of Ag, 20071,16417,88853,929100,236Not for humanconsumptionSolely for humanconsumptionFor both human andanimal consumptionSolely for animalconsumptionAcres of harvested cropland grown…
  • 24. ProductsSource: USDA Census of Ag, 2007Farm productsSales($1,000)%Total sales 220,675 100%Livestock & poultry 118,297 54%Milk and dairy 88,569 40%Cattle and calves 11,108 5%Hogs and pigs 307 0%Other animals and products 1,461 1%Crops 83,678 38%Fruits, tree nuts, and berries 28,776 13%Vegetables (including soybeans) 27,262 12%Nursery, greenhouse, floriculture,and sod19,293 9%Grain, oilseeds, dry beans, dry peas 18,701 8%
  • 25. PoliciesAgriculturaldistrictsThe AgriculturalDistricts Law createsa favorable operatingenvironment forproducers and helpslarge tracts of landstay in activeproduction.Source: New York State Agricultural DistrictsMapping Program, Cornell UniversityGeospatial Information Repository, 2012
  • 26. PoliciesFarmland Protection Plans
  • 27. Policies• Local, state, and federaleconomic developmentopportunities• Farmer education andworkforce development• New-farmer programs• Incentives forsustainable growingpractices• Land acquisition forurban growing• Permitting and licensing