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Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
Life Balance: Importance and Approach
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Life Balance: Importance and Approach

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For our final project in Managerial Leadership, taught by Professor Harry Kraemer at the Kellogg School of Management, my team relied on primary (survey and interviews) and secondary (books, articles, …

For our final project in Managerial Leadership, taught by Professor Harry Kraemer at the Kellogg School of Management, my team relied on primary (survey and interviews) and secondary (books, articles, prior research) sources to determine the benefits of work-life balance, how professionals view it, and what they are doing to implement it in their lives.

We surveyed 200+ Kellogg alums in various life stages and interviewed multiple professionals, from the CEO of Brunner Advertising to the author of Cinderella of Wall Street to gain additional perspective.

Please keep in mind that the survey we conducted was not rigorously designed nor were the respondents heavily screened. It was meant primarily to learn how current professionals are implementing life balance.

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  • Several images were acquired via the Creative Commons on Flickr.

    Flexibility Slide
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/wmk/243834654/
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    Priorities Slide
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  • We’ve talked a lot about regularly prioritizing and selecting activities in the classroom, but clearly this is something that will continue to be essential throughout our careers. When we interviewed the founder and CEO of Brunner, an advertising agency, he mentioned that he has made countless tradeoffs and sacrifices along the way. He advised that you have to accept the reality that you will have to give things up throughout your career, and he is not alone. 35% of alums rely on prioritization to select jobs, determine what projects to work on, plan out their weekly schedules, and more.Furthermore, it’s important to take the time to periodically reassess your priorities, as they are likely to change to reflect changes in your career and life.Sacrificing life-balance for career success might just backfire, says Joan Gurvis of the Center for Creative Leadership (CCL) and co-author of Finding Your Balance.Essentially, executives and managers who received high scores on the balance questions had high scores on leadership effectiveness, too, with balance scores 16 percent higher than less effective leaders. In effect, leaders who are rated by coworkers as having more balance between work and personal life are seen as significantly more effective in their roles. Gurvis concludes that we can lead balanced lives and be more effective in our work.According to a study on ‘A Leader's Best Bet: Exercise’ by CCL, time invested in regular exercise, even if it means spending less time at work, is correlated with higher ratings of leadership effectiveness. It seems that a healthy lifestyle can help executives better cope with the stresses and demands of their positions, ultimately increasing their leadership effectiveness. What is interesting from a leadership perspective is that organizations stand to gain when their leaders are physically fit, said CCL's Sharon McDowell-Larsen.
  • Quote from Alum in Linked In Survey: “Our clients, leading companies, are highly suspect of hiring executives who do not show consideration of family and colleagues in their approach to executive responsibilities. In fact, they are more interested in learning about the breadth and substance of the candidate than about training and experience, which are self-evident. That's why they are leading companies, such as Abbott Labs and Berkshire Hathaway.”Figures are based on anExecutive Briefing Series by the Boston College Center for Work & Family. Work-life programs at organizations provide the following benefits:Improve financial performance and shareholder value (Study across S&P 500 firms)Reduce costs (e.g. Deloitte estimates a savings of $41.5 million in turnover costs alone, by retaining employees who would have left the firm if they did not have a flexible arrangement; Flexible scheduling at Chubb reduced unscheduled time off by 50% each month and overtime by 40% per employee)Improve employee satisfaction, which in turn improves business results (e.g. 67% of employees report high levels of job satisfaction in organizations with high levels of workplace flexibility, versus 23% in organizations with low levels of flexibility.)Improve productivity (e.g. 7,000 employees at British Telecommunications work from home and have increased productivity by 31%)Improve ability to attract and retain talentImprove employee health and wellbeing (e.g. 1998 study of flexible work arrangements by The Royal Bank of Montreal)
  • Figures based on a survey of senior Fortune 500 male executives (Miller & Miller, 2005)
  • Corporate Lattice: the corporate latter is no longer an apt analogy for the reality of modern business. This framework really encapsulates multiple aspects of companies’ efforts to create cultures that offer more life balance. The lattice framework involves (1) non-linear career paths with moves across as well as up and down, (2) flexibility in work timing and location, (3) more transparent cultures with multiple means and routes of communication and feedback (i.e., no more static top-down communications). Think of the flexibility Baxter gave Karen May during a time in which she was more focused on being a mother, knowing she would later gear back up into a more purely career-focused orientation. Time as Currency: Good compensation is required but not sufficient. The most compelling reward employees can be given is flexibility – flexible work hours and location, summer hours, closing office between Christmas and New Years.PTO: Concept is forcing employees to take time away from work each week. BCG – each consultant on a team guaranteed one completely uninterrupted evening off each week from 6pm forward (no Blackberries, etc.). This forced the consultant teams to communicate more often and effectively and plan their work more methodically. Effectiveness of this structure has been recently supported by a Harvard Business Review 4-year study. In addition to benefits noted in BCG example, employees also found knowing they had forced time off made them more productive and efficient in their intensity of work while at the office (i.e., they were getting as much if not more work done in less time). Telecommuting: trend being driven by (1) increased flexibility increases employee satisfaction w/o adversely affecting productivity and (2) reduced real estate costs (e.g., Capital One reduced real estate expenses by 20%)Vacations: Beyond obvious benefits of increased perspective and rest, Richard Branson notes that “spending time away taught me the art and importance of delegating. I quickly learned what I was good at and made sure I brought in people to help with those areas where I was weaker.” “Being away from the office for periods of time also means you develop a strong bond of trust with your senior colleagues.”
  • Perhaps the most unifying, theme we came across in our research was the importance of being proactive and deliberate when it comes to achieving life balance. Not surprisingly, “being proactive” is also the first trait listed in the famous “Seven characteristics of highly effective people” that was conceived by Stephen Covey. As you’ll see when we delve into more detail, the key to achieving life balance is first determining what kind of life you want to have outside the office and then building from there through job selection and the implementation your own personal systems. Put conversely, what you do NOT want to is go about being reactivein balancing your time. That is, you don’t want to simply let the day, week, month, year unfold with out a system or plan in place and just hope that the hours of your life get divvied up perfectly into Professor Kraemer’s six buckets, or trick yourself into believing that you’ll be able to somehow achieve your perfect balance flying by the seat of your pants with no system in place. This means that while your company may have some really beneficial telecommunication options, flexible hours, just going to a company where it’s possible to have the life balance you want won’t get the job done by a long shot. It takes careful planning, honesty with ones self, well-defined priorities, and thoughtful sacrifice, and these are things that all rely on self reflection.
  • Our team conducted primary research through a Qualtrics survey. We also read the book CEO Road Rules and lastly conducted a lot of secondary research. After compiling all the data we found that four key themes came up Planning, Flexibility, Prioritizing and Boundaries. We will go into each theme in the next four slides.Although the themes are presented individually, it’s worth noting that they often complement or enable each other. For example, by understanding one’s priorities, you can set up boundaries to respect those priorities, and then implement those boundaries through planning (blocking them off on the calendar).
  • We’ve talked a lot about regularly prioritizing and selecting activities in the classroom, but clearly this is something that will continue to be essential throughout our careers. When we interviewed the founder and CEO of Brunner, an advertising agency, he mentioned that he has made countless tradeoffs and sacrifices along the way. He advised that you have to accept the reality that you will have to give things up throughout your career, and he is not alone. Furthermore, it’s important to take the time to periodically reassess your priorities, as they are likely to change to reflect changes in your career and life.
  • In terms of life balance the most important component for CEOs who achieved Life balance was planning. The authors called the CEO’s planning a Significance Plan.Significance Plan: your dreams, vision, and goals as determined by what significance means to you. Many CEOs wished they had, first, done more planning sooner; second, done more thoughtful planning with better research; and, third thought in terms of combining personal and business plans to guide decision making” In their research on successful people who reported great satisfaction with their lives, Nash and Stevenson authors of the book Just Enough talked about the importance of life balance in goal setting. They believe we all have too many choices in our lives and our targets may shift and increase as more choices appear. Since a lot of accomplished people are achievement oriented they often ignore or set standards that are too high to balance with other goals. Nash and Stevenson suggest and validate that those who ask themselves, “What’s enough for me?” and apply this to four areas of their life, are in fact the most fulfilled. These four areas are happiness (what brings you pleasure and satisfaction in life), achievement (what accomplishments you are reaching for), significance (what positive impact you want to have on those you care about), and legacy (how you will build on your values to help others find future success). Within each area, the authors suggest you set goals in each of these categories: self, family, work and community. Wheel of Life: the wheel enables you to visualize how well your life is balanced and also determine areas of your life that might be “wobbling”. Wheel includes: Intellectual engagement, productive pursuits, Leisure/Recreation, Health care/physical fitness, close relationships, community/social relationships, home fit/location, personal growth, financial well-being.  Lydia Interview - Prepare a blueprint for your whole life; need to look at both short and long term. She laid out a plan for her life, with specific goals for 5, 10, 25 years, etc. She looked at her career as a vocation, and paced herself. Didn’t have to get everything done in 10 years. Thinks it’s important to know what your goals are and where you are going.41.5% of responses to the “What is your primary method of managing work-life balance” question involved planning  
  • When Lydia Fisher was starting her post-MBA career, she knew that she wanted to work on Wall Street, but she couldn’t work the hours required in investment banking. She ultimately chose to work for Bear Stearns, a smaller firm at the time, as a commissions-based broker. From the beginning, Lydia relied on flexibility (in selecting a job) to protect her life balance. Like Lydia, 35% of the surveyed alums explicitly stated relying on some form of flexibility, both at home and at work, to manage their life balance.Flexibility is not only about having options, but also about being able to use those options as necessary. Fortunately, an increasing number of companies are offering more flexibility to their employees by allowing them to work remotely or on modified hours. Although you may not have a lot of flexibility early on in your career, it’s important to remember that you always have the flexibility to select the industry and roles that you work in. For example, one alum working in Industrial reported that he “quit a very good job because <he> travelled too much.”
  • 26% of responses to the “What is your primary method of managing work-life balance” question involved setting boundaries Tactical boundaries include (examples from survey):Limiting overnight travelBlocking out “catch up time”Scheduling and sticking to scheduleLimiting online activity after 7pmKeeping a standard work scheduleComing in early and working through lunch 
  • Transcript

    • 1. LIFE BALANCE IMPORTANCE & APPROACH SHRUTI MEHROTRA, ASHLEE MILLER, RAGHU NAYANI, KEVIN NEWELL, ORLANDO O’NEILL, CLIFF ORR, DREW PALIN
    • 2. Agenda – Life Balanceq  Importance of life balance •  To companies •  To individualsq  Company actions to implement employee balanceq  What you can do to achieve balance
    • 3. Balanced leaders are better performers…q  Onaverage, more effective leaders received 16% higher scores on “balance” questionsq  Leaderswho exercise regularly were rated significantly higher on their leadership effectiveness by their bosses, peers and direct reports Source: Center for Creative Leadership
    • 4. . . . companies are beginning to realize theproductivity benefits of life balance… Link between Increased return Companies with highly employee satisfaction on capital committed employees and profit had a 22% higher 3 year stock return Flexible work 86% of employees Users of flexible work arrangements have satisfied with life arrangements reported a positive impact balance stay with lower stress levels and on productivity the company had more energy
    • 5. . . . along with employees, who are pushing for new ways of workingq  84% prefer jobs that let them realize their professional aspirations while having more time outside of workq  55% are willing to sacrifice their incomeq  73% believe senior management jobs can be restructured to increase productivity and balance Source: Miller & Miller
    • 6. Recognizing its benefits, companies are systematically facilitating employee balanceq  Corporate Lattice, Not Ladder •  Deloitte, Cisco, Thomson Reutersq  Time is the New Currency •  Brunner Advertisingq  Predictability, Teaming and Openness •  The Boston Consulting Groupq  Telecommuting •  Capital One, Virgin and many othersq  Vacations •  Virgin
    • 7. Companies can assist in achieving balance, but employees must also be proactive and responsible Every Kellogg student should understand that this will become an issue in mid 30s and beyond. I never anticipated it, and am not sure I would have done things differently, but it might have been easier if it hadnt been so surprising. - Kellogg Alum, on maintaining life balance Proactive Reactiveq  Take responsibility for q  Let their life be dictated by everything in their life circumstances, othersq  Control situations that arise q  Let situations control themq  Cause things to happen q  Respond to whatever happensq  Anticipate and prepare q  Wait, rely on impulse
    • 8. From primary and secondary research, four themes emerge for managing life balanceq  Interviews •  Seven professionals on different career tracks Prioritizingq  Alumni survey - LinkedIn •  235 responses Planning •  Across various life stages and industriesq  Prior books and articles Flexibility •  CEO Road Rules •  Just Enough •  NY Times Corner Office •  Inc.com articles Boundaries
    • 9. Prioritizing “Set priorities and stick to them.” – Kellogg Alum q  Need to periodically reassess and adjust priorities as necessary q  35%1 of survey respondents prioritize to determine how to spend their time, both at home and at work1.  Life balance management methods utilized by respondents often incorporated multiple themes, so percentages do not sum to 100%
    • 10. Planning “I follow a daily schedule with priorities aligned to my personal balance.” – Kellogg Alum q  Significance Plan: your dreams, vision and goals as determined by what is significant to you q  Just Enough: Ask What’s enough for me? when setting goals in four areas of your life: 1.  Happiness 2.  Achievement 3.  Significance 4.  Legacy q  42%1 of survey respondents use planning to manage life balance1.  Life balance management methods utilized by respondents often incorporated multiple themes, so percentages do not sum to 100%
    • 11. Flexibility“I go into work early so that I can be home for dinner with my family.” – Kellogg Alum q  Flexibility is about retaining and exercising options •  How/when/where you work •  Industry •  Job q  35%1 of survey respondents rely on flexibility to manage life balance q  Take advantage of flexibility at home and at work 1.  Life balance management methods utilized by respondents often incorporated multiple themes, so percentages do not sum to 100%
    • 12. Boundary Management “I make a daily commitment. Pencils down at 6:30pm.” – Kellogg Alum q  Boundary management: establishing and following rules, based on your plans and priorities, to manage life balance q  26%1 of survey responses q  Five key steps to boundary management: 1.  Establish values-based priorities 2.  Determine tactical boundaries 3.  Communicate expectations to managers and employees 4.  Discipline yourself to follow 5.  Re-evaluate periodically1.  Life balance management methods utilized by respondents often incorporated multiple themes, so percentages do not sum to 100%
    • 13. Takeaways to Achieve Life Balance1.  Career productivity/success and balance are reinforcing, not mutually exclusive2. You are chiefly responsible for achieving your own balance3. Prioritize and plan, but most importantly, implement – consistent, daily execution is the key to managing life balance
    • 14. THANK YOU
    • 15. APPENDIX
    • 16. Takeaways to Achieve Life BalancePrioritizing: Each week, take an hour to thinkabout what your priorities are for the week.And each day, take 10 minutes to think how youare going to use tomorrow to achieve thisweeks priorities.- Wendy Kopp, Teach for America
    • 17. Takeaways to Achieve Life BalanceSetting Boundaries: Need to have guidelines inyour life. Be sure to implement those guidelines,but be open to adapting. Don’t compromise thevalues/guidelines that are most important toyour priorities.-Lydia Fisher, Author/Entrepreneur
    • 18. Takeaways to Achieve Life BalanceSystematic effort: Regardless of if you havethe drive and passion to work 24/7, realizethat others around you likely do not. Mostpeople need time off, and as a leader youshould seek to provide your team with balanceby striving to limit the workweek to 5 days inorder to keep your team fresh and preventburnout.-Jeffrey Katzenburg, Dreamworks Animation.
    • 19. Takeaways to Achieve Life BalanceStay Disciplined: Use "forcers" to staydisciplined. If you want to focus on improvingyour health, commit to an ironman or amarathon, this will force you to stay dedicated.There is a more visible consequence- failure- ifyou get lax and think about ignoring this focus.-Jana Eggers, Spreadshirt
    • 20. Interview – Lydia FisherKellogg Class of ‘80, Author/Entrepreneur, www.cinderellaofwallstreet.com¨  How important is work/life balance to you? Very important. Parents were immigrants, and they instilled a strong sense of balance between education and family. Furthermore, her mom always pushed her to pursue her own career. She credits 3 items with her emphasis on life balance: 1) Upbringing/values 2) Vocation 3) Belief that life satisfaction comes from being balanced and self-reliant In her career, she has seen that being balanced leads to happier, more creative employees.¨  Has work/life balance become harder to achieve as you have moved up in your career? Her priorities changed as time moved on. Early on, she focused on spending time with her children. She found a job at Bear Stearns that allowed for flexibility, openly communicated priorities with her team, and set expectations. Later in her career, after her kids were in college, she was able to put more hours into her work, which she loved, so she didn’t mind.   Nonetheless, she looked for other activities to fill some of the time she had previously spent with her children. Thinks it is very important to do things outside of work because it provides perspective.
    • 21. Interview – Lydia FisherKellogg Class of ‘80, Author/Entrepreneur, www.cinderellaofwallstreet.com¨  Do you have a work/life balance “philosophy” or work/life balance rules? How do you maintain work/life balance? Need to have guidelines in your life. Be sure to implement those guidelines, but be open to adapting. Don’t compromise the values/guidelines that are most important to your priorities.   Don’t compromise yourself for your work. She was devoted to Bear Stearns, but it was not the center of her universe. So when it was taken over, while painful, Lydia was able to reinvent in another direction. Putting too much emphasis on 1 thing distorts your perspective.   Remember, can’t undo your decisions. She laid out a plan for her life, with specific goals for 5, 10, 25 years, etc. She looked at her career as a vocation, and paced herself. Didn’t have to get everything done in 10 years. Thinks it’s important to know what your goals are and where you are going.¨  How do you spend your work and free time? Before, she used her free time for her kids. Now, she is engaged in philanthropic activities, including mentoring.
    • 22. Interview – Lydia FisherKellogg Class of ‘80, Author/Entrepreneur, www.cinderellaofwallstreet.com¨  How did you and do you establish boundaries at work for work/life balance? Which methods do you feel are most successful? She lived by her values and communicated them to her team and employer when appropriate. Thinks it is crucial to live by the values, or else it becomes just talk.¨  What kind of career trade-offs have you made in the past to preserve your work/life balance? Lydia chose her career with work/life balance goals in mind. She wanted to work in investment banking, but knew she couldn’t be a banker due to the long hours and travel. She needed to have flexibility and independence, especially given that her family had random time requirements. Although Bear Stearns was a smaller firm when she joined, her position in the commission-based sales and trading side had more defined hours and no travel requirements, so it gave her the flexibility needed to spend time with her children.   Initially focused more on her children, but as the kids grew older she began ramping up her work hours appropriately. It’s important to love the work you are in because you are going to spend so much time at work. Make sure you are getting something out of it (personal satisfaction).   Need to have a long-term, sustainable career outlook. Don’t burn yourself out early on, because it’s not a sprint into the c-suite.
    • 23. Interview – Lydia FisherKellogg Class of ‘80, Author/Entrepreneur, www.cinderellaofwallstreet.com¨  What kinds of lifestyle trade-offs have you made in the past to preserve your career trajectory? Had to make trade-offs throughout her career. ¤  Prioritized the most important things and put the time into those things ¤  Sacrificed her social life early on to focus on career and family, so she wasn’t able to network as much ¤  Gave up on some of her personal interests while finding ways to integrate the others into her larger scheme of priorities. For example, she bought a step machine so that she could do exercise while her children did homework ¤  Accepted slower career advancement initially, but she was still able to eventually reach the top spot of Senior Managing Director and become one of the top producers in the Private Client Services Division at Bear Stearns Need to be incredibly efficient in your life. Cut the fluff out, because if you don’t invest in the things that matter most to you, you won’t get the desired returns.¨  What would be your main takeaways for graduating MBA students? ¤  Know yourself and your priorities, your strengths and weaknesses, and then find the right venue through which to flourish ¤  Prepare a blueprint for your whole life; need to look at both short and long term ¤  Try to have a targeted number of different goals consistent within one’s overall life plan, and go for it ¤  Don’t forget to live
    • 24. Interview – Lydia FisherKellogg Class of ‘80, Author/Entrepreneur, www.cinderellaofwallstreet.com Lydia spent near three decades on Wall Street, the last two as a Senior Managing Director at Bear Stearns. She built one of the largest producing teams within the Private Client Services Division investing for corporations, families and executives. Lydia graduated with a BA in English Literature from the University of Notre Dame and an MBA from the JL Kellogg Graduate School of Business. She is the Founder and President of Galyda Media and, publisher/author of “Cinderella of Wall Street.” www.cinderellaofwallstreet.com Lydia participates in multiple professional and philanthropic organizations. She is a member of the Chicago Finance Exchange (a Chicago-based women’s network of top finance professionals) and a member of 85 Broads (a New York-based global women’s network). Lydia has been invited to host an event for the Kellogg Women’s Business Alumni in Finance and is a member of KAMP (Kellogg Alumni Mentorship Program). Lydia is an Honorary Member of the Center for The Study of The Great Ideas. She is a long-time member of the Joffrey Ballet Women’s Board and a former Governing Member of the Chicago Symphony. Lydia is the mother of two sons and a pianist.
    • 25. Interview – V.J. SingalKellogg Class of ‘79, Communication Consultant/Speaker, www.verbalenergy.com¨  How important is work/life balance to you? Very important. There are 3 key events that drove home the importance of life balance to V.J. in the early 1990s. 1.  He read an article in Fortune magazine where the author mentioned he has done countless interviews where Fortune 500 CEOs have wept, expressing regret for not having spent enough time with their families when their children were young. V.J. also highlighted two movies, Harvey (1950) and Lost Horizon (1937), that teach that anyone can create a peaceful place in their mind. It is a lesson that he thinks helps when you suffer setbacks. 2.  His best friend died suddenly at age 42. He had witnessed the same thing at Texas Instruments, when his mentor, a Kellogg alum, contracted cancer in her mid-thirties and died 6 weeks later. It taught him that there are no guarantees in life, so you can’t keep deferring your priorities. 3.  He came across a presentation by Stephen Covey (author of “The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People”) that extolled the need to take care of the important items (priorities) first: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-VDxKLSyksI. He came away with the lesson that you can and should schedule 3-4 major items, like vacations, every year to nourish your life while still managing all of the day-to-day demands.
    • 26. Interview – V.J. SingalKellogg Class of ‘79, Communication Consultant/Speaker, www.verbalenergy.com¨  How do you maintain work/life balance? 1.  Planning and scheduling activities in advance. If he didn’t preplan vacations, using nonrefundable tickets, he would most likely not take them, opting to work instead. Fortunately, he has learned that once you schedule the things that are critical to ensuring a work/life balance, you can still somehow fit all the day-to-day work-related activities in the remaining space. 2.  Making public commitments, either in writing or verbally, to hold himself to his priorities. Once he has “thrown his hat into the ring,” he will definitely pursue or work on those items, such as taking the time to go to a nature preserve at least one weekend every month with his wife. 3.  Using rational fear as motivation to maintain certain activities, such as exercise, that he might otherwise not keep up with. For example, he has gone jogging every day for the past 22 years. When he first started doing so, it wasn’t because he was naturally athletic; in fact, he thinks that he is probably more inclined to not doing exercise. But, he was able to motivate himself to do it because of his fear that he is more prone to illness (due to hereditary factors). He has learned to embody some fears through specific events, like the death of his best friend, to make them more effective motivators.
    • 27. Interview – V.J. SingalKellogg Class of ‘79, Communication Consultant/Speaker, www.verbalenergy.com V. J. Singal is a Houston-based communication consultant, coach, trainer, and speaker, and the author of The Articulate® Professional (3rd Edition, 2008). His recently launched blog Juicy and readily applicable communication tips on how to communicate with impact can be viewed at www.thearticulateprofessional.blogspot.com. Educated at Welham Preparatory School and The Doon School, he has a B.Tech. in civil engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, and an MBA with Distinction from Northwestern Universitys Kellogg School of Management. His opinions have been published in The Wall Street Journal and The Economist, and aired on the BBC, CNN Headline News, and KTRK-TV (Houstons ABC affiliate). V. J. spent over 20 years with Fortune 100 corporations, most recently with Texas Instruments. He has presented workshops on How to Emphasize Your Point in Just Three Sentences, The Five Techniques of Highly Effective Communicators, Advanced Public Speaking, and related topics to, among others, ExxonMobil, Shell, City of Houston, and students at Northwestern Universitys Kellogg School of Management.
    • 28. Interview – Mike BrunnerEntrepreneur and CEO of Advertising Agency, www.brunnerworks.com¨  Can you describe your perspective on work/life balance? Has your perspective evolved over time? I see work and “life” as almost interchangeable, as business is fulfilling for me. I don’t define myself by “work” and “life” and totally agree with the “life balance” concept versus a “work/life balance” concept. As an entrepreneur, I had to make sacrifices to build the business. You have to have critical mass, or your firm won’t make it. I was OK with the trade-offs in the early part of my career, but I was realistic about them.¨  Do you have a work/life balance “philosophy” or work life balance rules?  How do you maintain work/life balance? My life balance philosophy has evolved over time. I’m not a big rules guy. I believe that for every law you have, you have an outlaw. My goals were to build the company and have fun along the way.¨  How did you and do you establish boundaries at work for work/life balance?  Which methods do you feel are most successful? Listen to your body, it’s like an athlete. You can’t run yourself into the ground. Most folks that are fairly driven must watch out and put “gas in your tank”. The holidays, especially around the New Year, help me to recharge. I’m a big believer in fitness and try to get in 4 work outs a week. It’s a great stress reducer and helps me to clear my head.
    • 29. Interview – Mike BrunnerEntrepreneur and CEO of Advertising Agency, www.brunnerworks.com¨  How do you set expectations about your work schedule at home or with friends?  This is really all about setting expectations with your loved ones and having open communication. You must put your choices in context and perspective and realize that (1) you are going to have peaks and valleys at work and (2) you have to realize it’s not just about your career.¨  Any thoughts about life balance as an employer? An important component here is that, as an employer, the game has changed entirely. Time is absolutely the new currency. If I want to make staff happy, I must give them time. It’s equal to or better than anything else I can do. I need to pay people well, but they are most interested in time off, flexible hours and have shorter summer hours. I shut down the office between Christmas and New Years. Flex time is also a great thing as it allows people to work different parts of the week from home. The work economy has completely changed and employers need to do these things now.
    • 30. Interview – Mike BrunnerEntrepreneur and CEO of Advertising Agency, www.brunnerworks.com Michael Brunner is the driving force behind Brunner’s growth to $200 million since the brand launched in 1989. Earlier than most of the competitors, he foresaw the importance of differentiation in the ultra- competitive advertising arena and led the company with his unique perspective. He has developed an original business model founded on two key components: Number 1. People first. And number 2. Diversified strategic growth.Michael’s accomplishments have not gone unnoticed in the industry. He served on the national board ofthe American Association of Advertising Agencies and was an active member of the American MarketingAssociation and Carnegie Mellon University’s School of Entrepreneurship. He also served as president ofthe American Advertising Federation’s Pittsburgh Ad Club and was on its board for six years.Michael is well known in Pittsburgh for his untiring efforts to serve the community and is a strongadvocate of community service especially when it comes to creating opportunities for young peopleentering the marketing and advertising business. He earned a bachelor of arts at Bowling GreenUniversity and a master’s degree at the University of Pittsburgh. Michael and his wife Marita reside in Peter’s Township. He is an avid golfer and wine enthusiast.
    • 31. InterviewMBA Graduate, Former Retail Executive¨  Can you describe your perspective on work/life balance? Always need to be conscious of the balance, while understanding that you aren’t going to have a lot of choices early on. Furthermore, your current life status (single, married, married with children, etc.) matters.   Their advice: ¤  Be conscious of your balance ¤  Ask yourself if the work hours are worth it ¤  Answer the question honestly, and modulate your expectations¨  Has your perspective evolved over time? First 10 years of their career were very imbalanced. Were managing their career through the philosophy of “whatever it takes.” Need to have a good partner or be a “strong” individual if you are on your own to make this work.   In the latter part of their career, they worked just as much as before, but now they had more flexibility, resources, and experiences, so they were able to manage their balance a lot better. This rebalancing occurred naturally as they progressed up the ladder. Found that priorities shift naturally as you grow older and become more mature.
    • 32. InterviewMBA Graduate, Former Retail Executive¨  How actively would you say that you manage your work/life balance? There is a period of management, but then it becomes a natural part of how you live. It also depends on what you consider work and fun. Some things that might be considered work for others are fun for them, so they don’t mind putting the hours into those activities.¨  Please describe your primary methods for managing work/life balance? ¤  Personal assistant: someone that helps you organize your life ¤  Delegation: knowing what to do and what to delegate out ¤  Prioritization: knowing what is and what isn’t important. “Will it move the needle or not?” ¤  Being organized ¤  Using time creatively: take advantage of dead time. Would hold phone meetings with different locations on the drives in and out of work   Thinks that your ability to manage work/life balance depends on: ¤  Where you are in your career ¤  What your priorities are: have your own personal Maslow Matrix ¤  What industry/profession you are in
    • 33. InterviewMBA Graduate, Former Retail Executive¨  Were you able to manage your work/life balance as effectively when you first started working? Not as much. Found that it was much harder to focus on this early on in their career. As you move up, you get more flexibility, such as being able to set your own hours. Can also make tradeoffs that you didn’t have early on.   There are professions where you can manage the balance better, but you can’t expect to have a lot of balance early on.
    • 34. Survey DataAdministered to Kellogg alumni in different life stages Respondents by Kellogg Graduation Date 235 73 50 37 30 45 Total <5yrs 5-10yrs 11-15yrs 16-20yrs 21+ yrs
    • 35. Survey Data Administered to Kellogg alumni in different life stages All Respondents Importance of Life Balance Level of Life Balance Management 98100 100 83 80 80 69 66 60 60 51 40 35 40 31 20 20 11 9 4 5 2 5 1 0 0Not Important at All Very Important Not active at all Very Active
    • 36. Survey Data Administered to Kellogg alumni in different life stages < 5 Years Post MBA Importance of Life Balance Level of Life Balance Management 30 30 25 25 26 24 24 18 18 15 14 12 12 12 12 7 6 4 3 6 2 1 0 0Not Important at All Very Important Not active at all Very Active
    • 37. Survey Data Administered to Kellogg alumni in different life stages 5-10 Years Post MBA Importance of Life Balance Level of Life Balance Management 30 30 25 24 24 19 18 18 15 12 11 12 12 8 6 3 6 1 2 1 2 1 0 0Not Important at All Very Important Not active at all Very Active
    • 38. Survey Data Administered to Kellogg alumni in different life stages 11-15 Years Post MBA Importance of Life Balance Level of Life Balance Management 30 30 24 24 18 15 18 13 12 12 10 11 9 9 6 6 6 1 0 0Not Important at All Very Important Not active at all Very Active
    • 39. Survey Data Administered to Kellogg alumni in different life stages 16-20 Years Post MBA Importance of Life Balance Level of Life Balance Management 30 30 24 24 18 15 18 12 13 12 12 8 6 6 3 6 1 2 0 0Not Important at All Very Important Not active at all Very Active
    • 40. Survey Data Administered to Kellogg alumni in different life stages 21+ Years Post MBA Importance of Life Balance Level of Life Balance Management 30 30 24 24 18 17 18 18 14 12 12 10 11 6 6 4 6 3 1 1 1 1 1 2 0 0Not Important at All Very Important Not active at all Very Active
    • 41. Survey Data MBA Grad Importance of Level of Date Industry/Role balance1 Management2 Primary Method for Managing Balance Under 5 years Consulting 5 4 Setting boundaries for myself. For example: try to not work over the weekends. Under 5 years marketing consulting 3 3 Under 5 years Consulting 5 5 Under 5 years Consulting 2 4 Starting a new work-out routine every Monday. And giving up on Tuesday. Under 5 years med device 5 4 dont have any specific methods working from home in the evenings rather than staying in the office unnecessarily; Under 5 years Consulting 3 3 communicating openly with my teams about project norms around work/life balance Foodservice/ Under 5 years 6 6 Block my entire calendar for work, school and family Hospitality setting clear expectations at beginning of each project with team members (9am-6pm core Under 5 years 6 6 hours, then work from home, no weekend work) 5-10 years Pharmaceutical 6 5 Setting limits on the hours I spend in the office and pushing back on work requests self employed - putting life and activities first and then choosing a career/job that compliments those 16-20 years 6 6 corporate finance activities 16-20 years it 7 7 work extra when needed to permit scheduling of family events Financial, federa Disengaging from work when I am at home and making sure scheduling doesnt cross over Under 5 years 7 7 credit union. between the work and personal. 21+ years 7 7 use e-calendar for all appts, including working out, kids events 21+ years Government 6 5 Try to adhere to specific down periods devoted to family Under 5 years Finance 5 5 11-15 years Attorney 6 5 Work less 21+ years 6 6 flexible working hours and days 21+ years market research 7 6 I go into work early so I can be home for dinner with my family. I work out at lunch so I can 5-10 years 6 6 get my daily exercise. Finally, I bring my laptop home so I can answer e-mails and finish other work after I put my kids to bed. 5-10 years 7 51.  Survey question: How important is work-life balance to you at this point in your career? (1=not important at all, 7=very important)2.  Survey question: How active are you in managing your work-life balance? (1=not active at all, 7=very active)
    • 42. Survey Data MBA Grad Importance of Level of Date Industry/Role balance1 Management2 Primary Method for Managing Balance Under 5 years Telecommunications 7 5 Individual investor 11-15 years 7 7 Define your personal core values and make decisions that align with such values and entrepreneur Under 5 years student 4 4 exercise, spend time with my family Consulting and Stay in control: started my own consulting business & am also co-founder of a 16-20 years 7 7 pharmaceuticals pharmaceutical startup. 11-15 years IT [Software] 7 4 try to prioritize between big buckets 5-10 years Automotive 7 5 Be in The schedule 21+ years manufacturing 5 6 making sure I’m involved in many activities outside of work Under 5 years Software 5 4 Using Outlook Calendar to understand home time vs. time on the road. Under 5 years 6 6 Under 5 years 7 4 vacation, adjusting our work schedules (start the day early), work from home options 21+ years 5 3 Prioritization of work and home activities. Management None - I make $1.2million a year and have no expectations of work life balance 5-10 years 2 1 Consulting whatsoever 11-15 years 5 4 work from home I try to have really meaningful vacations (trips, beach, etc.). Things that my family will never Under 5 years 6 4 forget. I dont have a choice. My wife also works full-time and we have 2 young children, so we 5-10 years Consumer Goods 7 5 share pick up and drop off duties. This forces me to make time for my family whenever I am not traveling for work. 21+ years 7 7 Work long days during the week to keep free time available on the weekends. Take my 21+ years Telecommunications 5 5 earned vacation time off (didnt use to do that) 11-15 years 6 5 taking a day off and ignoring the PDA picking a job without travel requirements, choosing to work within a 30 minute drive (each 5-10 years healthcare 7 5 way) from home self-employed 5-10 years 7 6 Systems, like Getting Things Done by David Allen. consultant1.  Survey question: How important is work-life balance to you at this point in your career? (1=not important at all, 7=very important)2.  Survey question: How active are you in managing your work-life balance? (1=not active at all, 7=very active)
    • 43. Survey Data MBA Grad Importance of Level of Date Industry/Role balance1 Management2 Primary Method for Managing Balance Have negotiated for half day Fridays for three seasons and Fridays off in summer. Also 11-15 years Advertising 6 6 aggressively manage my workload by saying "no." to things and ruthlessly prioritizing 5-10 years Consulting 4 4 Maintain open communication with my wife. strategic innovation/ For me, its about being disciplined -- getting exercise every day, visiting with family, 5-10 years 6 6 research getting together regularly with friends, staying on top of personal finances, etc. 16-20 years Outsourcing service 6 5 Having remote access so that I can work from home or any location with good wi-fi. 16-20 years 5 6 11-15 years Technology - software 7 6 Under 5 years 7 7 Prioritization and focus. Under 5 years Finance 7 7 Calendar management Under 5 years 5 5 Stay away from work related stuff on the weekends. 11-15 years 6 5 You have to say "no" to work. Use adaptive scheduling (synchronized with family) and also use a coach to assist in goal 5-10 years 5 5 setting & execution. Marketing, especially Working as a freelance consultant rather than for a corporation; it allows me more 21+ years 7 6 for non-profits flexibility in scheduling and residence 5-10 years 6 5 Managing work commitments, working from home managing upwards to be proactive on deadlines and then leaving work to spend time on 16-20 years engineering services 6 6 other priorities in the evening Under 5 years Technology Sales 6 7 Schedule out my day beforehand (as much as possible) more effective usage of resources and deligate work, using calendar, prioritizing work and Under 5 years consulting 7 7 ask for help from others. Under 5 years Retail - Law 7 7 School (Kellogg and children (14 and 17) are all demanding Under 5 years Pharmaceutical 5 5 Scheduling life time 11-15 years 6 6 communications / 5-10 years 4 4 Discipline. public affairs1.  Survey question: How important is work-life balance to you at this point in your career? (1=not important at all, 7=very important)2.  Survey question: How active are you in managing your work-life balance? (1=not active at all, 7=very active)
    • 44. Survey Data MBA Grad Importance of Level of Date Industry/Role balance1 Management2 Primary Method for Managing Balance My primary method is focused around limiting my overnight travel. Trying to only go on mandatory business trips. In addition, I am now not scheduling every minute of every day 5-10 years 7 4 with non-stop conference calls. Leaving blank areas in the calendar is difficult but seems to be working. looking at the schedule a day at a time to balance childrens activities between me and my 5-10 years Utilities 7 4 spouse Ive begun consulting to allow flexibility in taking care of family obligations and taking 21+ years 7 7 advantage of some personal enrichment 21+ years Marketing research 6 6 Made a career change to bring greater flexibility into my job 5-10 years Insurance marketing 6 2 Exercise and time away from work 11-15 years Retail 7 7 Eliminating travel, not checking blackberry or emailing others after "hours", private aviation 16-20 years 5 5 Try to manage schedule as best as I can and use weekends wisely industry Balance is not the term, I pick the things that are most important and go full bore at them- 5-10 years 5 5 sometimes sacrificing family sometimes sacrificing work 16-20 years 6 6 working out during the day and not working late 21+ years 4 6 11-15 years Financial Services 7 7 I have a flexible schedule with reduced hours. it requires active thought and participation by you and all interested parties (home/work/ 21+ years 6 6 other activities) Nothing is more important than family. That goes for me and my employees. If that is in good shape, the work people produce will be that much better. You may run across the 16-20 years Education 7 6 ocassional person who takes unfair advantage of that philosophy and that is the person you call out to "shape up or ship out". real estate Under 5 years 6 5 development In a transition mode right now - I just got pregnant and all of the sudden what once wasnt that important is now extremely important! I am not sure how to proceed but have started Under 5 years 6 4 letting the managers in my company know that achieving work life balance is going to be very important.1.  Survey question: How important is work-life balance to you at this point in your career? (1=not important at all, 7=very important)2.  Survey question: How active are you in managing your work-life balance? (1=not active at all, 7=very active)
    • 45. Survey Data MBA Grad Importance of Level of Date Industry/Role balance1 Management2 Primary Method for Managing Balance 21+ years Financial Services 6 6 Setting up priorities 16-20 years Non-profit 7 6 Doing work at home, on train, etc. outside of work hours. 21+ years Minerals 7 7 Setting and keeping to a schedule I provide a work schedule to my wife at the outset of each week to let her know when Ill Under 5 years Institutional Trading 7 6 be around so we can maximize the limited amount of time we have together. 21+ years 5 5 association 21+ years 7 5 working in an environment that respects family and compensatory time off management Under 5 years Computer Technology 7 5 prioritize often and compartmentalize my projects across all functions of my life. Office furniture Job selection - less travel, less stress, more flexible hours. The cost is lower challenge; less 16-20 years 6 6 dealer intellectually satisfying work 11-15 years 5 5 Being an entrepreneur Under 5 years Consumer products 4 4 setting a daily finish time for work activities independent 16-20 years 6 6 trying hard not to work on weekends marketing consultant Ive taken myself off of a "career track" and only work on a contract basis in consulting; I 11-15 years 7 6 pick and choose when/what projects I can or will work on. Also do a lot of work from home. Under 5 years Packaging Services 5 5 Leaving work on time as much as possible. I try to spend time at home on the weekends, and find ways to fly home early, or out late. I Under 5 years 6 7 struggle a great deal with this. Planning in advance, blocking out time on my calendar for "catch up time" which can be 5-10 years Tax Accounting 7 6 used for anything but is reserved only for me (no one @ work can pre-book that time on my calendar) Under 5 years 6 5 Calendar 16-20 years 5 4 Under 5 years Retail 7 5 16-20 years 7 3 Trying to schedule business trips around important family dates, but it is very difficult. 5-10 years Airlines 6 5 No work on weekends, push back on work that I cannot do in work time1.  Survey question: How important is work-life balance to you at this point in your career? (1=not important at all, 7=very important)2.  Survey question: How active are you in managing your work-life balance? (1=not active at all, 7=very active)
    • 46. Survey Data MBA Grad Importance of Level of Date Industry/Role balance1 Management2 Primary Method for Managing Balance 21+ years 3 5 Use a more scheduled timeframes for work and plan both work and personal Under 5 years 6 5 Information Working from home and using a Blackberry allow me to be productive even when not in an 21+ years 6 6 Technology office Managing my in office time wisely to maximize output and allow myself to be at home Under 5 years 7 5 more. Also managing travel, combining meetings to reduce trips out of town. 16-20 years 6 6 Planning activities, limiting on line activity after 7pm. Commercial Real listening to my wife and children. looking for opportunities to participate in their lives and 16-20 years 7 7 Estate providing new activities for them. 11-15 years High tech -- software 7 6 Time shifting, working from home, selective travel, on line meetings 21+ years 6 5 allocating time off 5-10 years 6 6 I have chosen work at a less demanding travel role while my kids are young 21+ years 4 3 Personal control over scheduling Under 5 years Legal 7 5 Trying to create boundaries and limits to my work 11-15 years 6 5 Ensure that expectations at work of deliverables are realistic. Ensure that boundaries are 5-10 years Software 6 6 known and understood by colleagues. 5-10 years Software 6 5 When I was downsized from Corporate I started investigating other business opportunities 5-10 years 7 7 that would allow me to pro-actively manage my w-l balance, namely going into business for myself. I try to keep a standard work schedule. We scheduled time to do things together as a 5-10 years Non-profit publishing 7 6 family. Under 5 years 3 4 11-15 years distribution 5 4 turning off blackberry Primary, although not very proactive way is dedicating time when I need to take care of Under 5 years consulting 6 2 personal commitments and family time and making it up later in the evenings. 11-15 years 5 5 managing my schedule efficiently, being clear on prioritization of tasks1.  Survey question: How important is work-life balance to you at this point in your career? (1=not important at all, 7=very important)2.  Survey question: How active are you in managing your work-life balance? (1=not active at all, 7=very active)
    • 47. Survey Data MBA Grad Importance of Level of Date Industry/Role balance1 Management2 Primary Method for Managing Balance Aerospace and 21+ years 4 4 Calendar - certain times reserved for family and outside work activities defense Under 5 years retail 7 5 I traveled internationally 38 weeks a year. I have 5 kids and wasnt involved in their lives. Under 5 years CPG 7 7 I earned my MBA from Kellogg in June of 2010 in order to move positions within my organization. This move has enabled me to take control of my work-life "blend" Under 5 years Own company 6 6 Shut down the work part when necessary. People can wait for me. Management Am I forgetting important dates, events, relatives well-being not related to work? I monitor 21+ years Consulting/Executive 7 7 my calendar; sure clue to balance. and Board Search 5-10 years Ecommerce 7 7 Technology to be able to work at hours and time that are appropriate. started my own company in 2004 (when I was 35) - this is a GREAT topic and something 11-15 years 7 7 current students need to anticipate Packaging; consumer Under 5 years 7 6 Dedicating certain times of the week to both career and non-career activities. goods (non food) 16-20 years 7 6 Haven’t taken a full time job in 10 years... mostly 15 - 30 hour a week commitments fully assess work/life/family consequences and get buy in from all (family) before 11-15 years Medical devices 7 7 proceeding schedule my priorities – if I want to attend a cub scout meeting or soccer practice, I make 11-15 years Military 7 7 an appointment for it in my calendar. I also make it a point to call my wife at lunch as were often so beat at the end of the day that the conversation isnt always cheerful! Under 5 years Banking 5 3 Trying to leave the office and getting myself off of go-nowhere projects. 16-20 years Internet 6 5 5-10 years 6 6 integrated work/family schedule 5-10 years Healthcare 6 5 Adjusting working hours around family commitments, 11-15 years Consulting 6 6 Spend 1 hour with children and at least 30min-1 hour exclusively with spouse every day. I work diligently to continually assess where I am most needed - and where I most need to 21+ years 6 6 be. Also a very disciplined planner. picking the job. Have dinner everyday with the family. At least once a week pick up the 5-10 years Medical Device 6 5 kids from school. no working before kids are in bed.1.  Survey question: How important is work-life balance to you at this point in your career? (1=not important at all, 7=very important)2.  Survey question: How active are you in managing your work-life balance? (1=not active at all, 7=very active)
    • 48. Survey Data MBA Grad Importance of Level of Date Industry/Role balance1 Management2 Primary Method for Managing Balance Setting time goals for non-work activities weekly. I set loose and flexible goals when Engineering and Under 5 years 5 5 possible so I can be flexible if something comes up at work but still achieve my goal of Construction personal time during the week. Under 5 years tech (software) 3 3 running my own start-up at the moment so work-life balance is taking a back seat Under 5 years 6 6 Under 5 years Consulting 6 6 Set priorities and stick to them 5-10 years consumer products 7 7 take control of your calendar, and put important family items on calendar first. Working consistent hours so I can pick my infant daughter up at daycare the same time Under 5 years medical devices 6 5 every day since routine is important at her age 21+ years Consulting 6 6 Under 5 years 4 3 Construction / 5-10 years 7 7 Federal Market 16-20 years 6 6 prioritization of work activities to allow sufficient time for outside interests I keep my family first, and prioritize my work based on what needs to be done 16-20 years Publishing 7 7 immediately vs. later. Under 5 years Telecommunications 6 4 Scheduling & Work from home Under 5 years Media 7 6 Prioritizing 11-15 years tech 7 7 flexible scheduling/work from home 5-10 years 6 4 5-10 years 7 6 Managing deliverables in all aspects, taking care not to over commit Healthcare Under 5 years 7 7 Manufacturing 16-20 years IT 7 7 finding a professional part-time job, reducing career/money expectations Coming in early and working through lunches to be home at a reasonable hour. Attempting 5-10 years 7 5 to bunch up meetings at off site locations so that overnight travel can be minimized. 5-10 years Telecommunications 7 4 21+ years Consulting 6 61.  Survey question: How important is work-life balance to you at this point in your career? (1=not important at all, 7=very important)2.  Survey question: How active are you in managing your work-life balance? (1=not active at all, 7=very active)
    • 49. Survey Data MBA Grad Importance of Level of Date Industry/Role balance1 Management2 Primary Method for Managing Balance I left "big corporate" (the biggest, actually) to run my own business. Less effort managing 21+ years Retail 7 5 process and politics means more time for me. I delegate all the issues that could be dealt without my personal participation even if I can Under 5 years 6 6 do them quicker (but not better) Under 5 years retail 7 7 setting up a regular schedule to work from home Under 5 years CPG 5 5 21+ years Higher Education 6 4 Schedule vacations far in advance. Education 16-20 years 7 5 Choice of employment - trade off pay/responsibility for flexibility Management Distributor to building 21+ years 5 6 As an independent entrepreneur, I control my own agenda contractors communication 21+ years 7 7 Limiting my work-day objective to six identifiable accomplishments consulting 16-20 years Hotels. hospitality 7 6 Making time for family events, even if it is during the workday. Ensuring that each week some time spent in nature preserves, and watching at least one 21+ years Training 7 7 "great" movie, and the like, SCHEDULING ACTIVITIES THAT HAVE A FEE ASSOCIATED WITH THEM. IF I PAY, I WILL 11-15 years CONSULTING 6 4 MAKE SURE I SHOW UP. Private Equity/ schedule control: ensuring that I see my kids in the morning each day and before they go to Under 5 years 6 5 Venture Capital bed declining career opportunities or assignments that negatively impact the balance and tip 21+ years 7 7 too far toward work Consumer durables I put family first.... but there are some time-dependent activities (i.e. Annual Sales Meeting) 21+ years 5 5 manufacturing that I must make time for. Trying to commit to leaving work at a certain time & not working at home while my husband Under 5 years Manufacturing 6 3 is also at home. 5-10 years cpg 7 7 21+ years finance 1 1 With the chance of job loss so high, work has to come first1.  Survey question: How important is work-life balance to you at this point in your career? (1=not important at all, 7=very important)2.  Survey question: How active are you in managing your work-life balance? (1=not active at all, 7=very active)
    • 50. Survey Data MBA Grad Importance of Level of Date Industry/Role balance1 Management2 Primary Method for Managing Balance 5-10 years Investment Banking 7 7 5-10 years 7 7 Managerial 11-15 years 6 5 Consulting Under 5 years Bio Tech 6 4 Strong self-discipline with schedule (7 Habits principles) and occasional reminders that I can 16-20 years Retail 7 5 not do everything.....nor do I wan to. 5-10 years Technology 6 6 Work after hours when family is in bed 11-15 years Software 6 7 plan things ahead of time Aggressive in managing/protecting evening schedule. Willing to sacrifice early AM hours 21+ years pharmaceutical 6 6 to gain family time in the evening Aerospace and Under 5 years 6 5 Weekly meeting with my Wife to plan the upcoming week Defense Commercial Real Working longer hours and weekends in which I am not time constrained. Then working Under 5 years 6 6 Estate shorter hours on days that I am time constrained. Also delegate to employees more. Small business Setting priorities and giving personal priority items the same consideration as work priority 21+ years 7 6 consulting items 21+ years Executive Search 7 7 I follow a daily schedule with priorities aligned to my personal balance 11-15 years 7 7 Avoiding work at home - no blackberry / laptop / email. If I need to check it in the Under 5 years 6 6 evenings or weekends, I set a specific time range for it. I set time boundaries for work email and calls. I try not to take the BB or laptop on Under 5 years Financial Services 7 5 vacations. Always make time to work out. quit a very good job because I travelled too much. constantly looking at how much time I 16-20 years industrial 7 5 put in at work and jobs I take by reflecting on "when I am 70 and look back on this time, will I say I made the right decision?"1.  Survey question: How important is work-life balance to you at this point in your career? (1=not important at all, 7=very important)2.  Survey question: How active are you in managing your work-life balance? (1=not active at all, 7=very active)
    • 51. Survey Data MBA Grad Importance of Level of Date Industry/Role balance1 Management2 Primary Method for Managing Balance Managing work-life balance is a combination of juggling priorities. At work you need to focus on the strategic initiatives that are critical to the organizations success and at times let 11-15 years Education 5 5 less important initiatives take a back seat. Outside of work I manage balance between, working out, taking time to connect with friends/family, faith/church, and giving back to those less fortunate thru my time. Stop checking blackberry at home as much as possible. Check messages once every few Under 5 years Retail 5 5 hours on weekends. getting family schedules as early as possible, constantly discussing possibilities with my 21+ years pharamceuticals 6 7 spouse and children Healthcare Products Regular prioritization of work, assessment of full organization work load, focus on the 5-10 years 7 7 Manufacturing impactful activity, process improvement 21+ years Investments 7 6 I manage my own calendar and have access to those of my family. Taking the time off when I need it. Managing my department so it will funciton when Im not 21+ years Industrial machinery 7 7 there. Start with family obligations, personal schedule. To the extent possible, fill in business Packaging and 5-10 years 6 4 obligations around these "pillars". Next reconcile family vs. business priority. Where Displays conflicts exist, engage managers/partners to aid in reconciling. Manufacturing/Sales 21+ years of Construction 4 5 Equipment Under 5 years Consulting 5 5 Time boxing work activities so they dont take over personal / family activities Make sure scope and expectations are setup upfront and build in target work-life balance 5-10 years Consulting 7 7 into scope wireless 11-15 years 6 2 Time management and use allocated time to defined priorities telecommunications management 11-15 years 7 7 being self-employed and taking accountability for how much and when I work consulting I left McKinsey in Chicago, moved closer to extended family in Atlanta (free babysitting - Under 5 years Hospitality 7 7 key with 3rd child), found a job with no travel1.  Survey question: How important is work-life balance to you at this point in your career? (1=not important at all, 7=very important)2.  Survey question: How active are you in managing your work-life balance? (1=not active at all, 7=very active)
    • 52. Survey Data MBA Grad Importance of Level of Date Industry/Role balance1 Management2 Primary Method for Managing Balance 5-10 years Human Resources 6 2 Trying not to let work e-mails and calls interfere overwhelm my evenings and weekends 21+ years 7 5 Not checking work e-mail on weekends. Work on weekends only by prior arrangement. Providing clients with clear, up front communication of my personal commitments and Management Under 5 years 7 7 gaining an equally clear understanding of their expectations in advance of beginning a Consulting project Under 5 years For Profit Education 6 5 Management 5-10 years 6 7 Telling my EA to actively manage my appointments and tasks Consulting 11-15 years Retail Oil & Gas 6 5 Gym 3x per week. Under 5 years IT 7 5 Changed jobs. Made expectations clear at time of hire. Remind management that I will 11-15 years 6 7 always deliver, but need evenings & weekends for family. Investment Control my work time and try to follow a disciplined approach to time management to give Under 5 years 7 5 Management my work and family their fair share of my time. B2B. Making/selling Keep focus on family. Participate in my kids school/sports activities and sacrifice work time 5-10 years cleaning products and 6 5 for family time if needed. equipment. Corporate finance 21+ years 2 2 advisory Get in the office early, leave at 6PM, have dinner with my wife and kids. If needed, do e- 16-20 years Equipment 6 5 mail late at night at home. Schedule adult time every week with spouse 5-10 years pharmaceuticals 6 4 Not sure what you mean here, but having one source of truth for a calendar and putting all 5-10 years Health Care 7 7 of my commitments in one place is a good start. Under 5 years telecommunications 2 3 I am trying a new method of breaking my life into buckets and determining how many hrs a Under 5 years financial services 7 6 week I should spend in each a week- just went to Kramers 8 bricks of leadership presentation a week ago Use vacation and sick days for time off for balance. Use sick time for Doctor’s 16-20 years 7 4 appointments etc.1.  Survey question: How important is work-life balance to you at this point in your career? (1=not important at all, 7=very important)2.  Survey question: How active are you in managing your work-life balance? (1=not active at all, 7=very active)

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