Ali O. Oncel Geophysicist Networking
Networking: What is it? <ul><li>“ Networking is the deliberate process of  exchanging information, resources,  support and...
Hidden Jobs <ul><li>80% of all available jobs   aren’t posted  in the classifieds or on job boards.  </li></ul><ul><li>60%...
Context <ul><li>Literature Review </li></ul><ul><li>Networking Tips </li></ul><ul><li>Electronic Networking </li></ul>
Recent Publications
Context <ul><li>Literature Review </li></ul><ul><li>Networking Tips </li></ul><ul><li>Electronic Networking </li></ul>
Source :http://www.marketitwrite.com/images/crains.pdf
 
Tips for no-pain networking
Top  Networking Tips <ul><li>Prepare an &quot;elevator speech“   </li></ul><ul><li>Use your existing ties   </li></ul><ul>...
  Elevator Pitch Data shows that when you initially meet someone, their  first impression of you is formed within the firs...
Context <ul><li>Literature Review </li></ul><ul><li>Networking Tips </li></ul><ul><li>Web 2 - Networking </li></ul>
<ul><li>&quot; Web 2.0 &quot; refers to what is perceived as a second  generation  of  web development  and  web design . ...
WIKI <ul><li>A  wiki  is a  website  that uses  wiki software , allowing the easy creation and editing of any number of  i...
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  • Networking for Success: Who Will Connect You to Your Next Job? By Emily Breckenridge According to New York career-management firm, BH Careers International, 80% of all available jobs aren’t posted in the classifieds or on job boards. Additionally, 60% of people surveyed by BH said they got their last job by networking [http://www.careerjournal.com/jobhunting/networking/20050215-bradford.html]. Though networking can be awkward and uncomfortable, the fact is, it is the best way to find a job. Here are a few tips to help you develop, and successfully execute a networking strategy. 1) Prepare an elevator pitch. Data shows that when you initially meet someone, their first impression of you is formed within the first two minutes they spend with you. After that first impression is formed, it is extremely difficult for it to be changed. A 30-second elevator pitch should be a part of every professional’s job search arsenal, including yours, for this very reason. An elevator pitch is a quick speech that you have memorized in case you ever meet someone who you need to make a good, professional impression on. It is also a great starting point for beginning a conversation with employers at job fairs, or as a way of summarizing yourself at the beginning of an interview. Make it upbeat, and to the point, stating who you are, what you do and what you’re looking for. For additional information on elevator pitches, check out First Impressions: How to Deliver a Professional 30-second Elevator Pitch from the September 18, 2007 issue of TechNews. 2) Keep your marketing tools up-to-date. Keep your resume, and any social or professional network profiles up-to-date. You should provide a resume to all of your networking contacts as an initial point of reference, and send them a new one every time you add something new to it (i.e. a new degree or a new job). If you have a MySpace or other social networking site profile, make sure that it is appropriate, and that nothing on it would prevent a job offer if a potential employer saw it. 3) Tap into your existing network. It’s a small world, and you never know who your parents’ friends or your friends’ friends might know. Spread the word that you’re looking for a job to family, friends and ex-colleagues, and ask if they might be able to offer any advice. Then have that network connect you to a broader one, by asking, “Do you know anyone else who might be helpful for me to meet?” 4) Become involved in an industry-specific association. Professional organizations and associations are one of the best ways to expand your network. Student membership fees are usually inexpensive, and the benefits of membership definitely outweigh the cost. Professional associations are an easy way to connect with others in your field, and these connections often result in job referrals. Many associations also post job ads on their websites, sometimes limiting access to members. Many HR representatives report that they like to advertise, sometimes exclusively, on these sites, because good candidates are usually members of professional organizations. Additionally, many HR representatives report that they use association conferences and/or trade shows to seek potential hires, because attendance and participation show that a person is committed to staying on the cutting edge of the field. To increase your visibility to HR at those events, don’t just attend association events or trade shows – instead, participate! Volunteer to help organize a meeting or a part of the event, offer your expertise by presenting on a topic, or simply just ask educated questions. 5) Take it slow. If you’ve met someone for the first time whom you think would be a great person to have in your professional network, don’t rush it. Build your relationship with your new contact before asking for help. Stacey L. Bradford of the Wall Street Journal suggests that you “Consider dropping a personal note to any new contact you meet at an industry event. Then follow-up, perhaps with a helpful article or introduction to someone you know.” 6) Networking is a two-way street. Show your concern and interest for your networking contacts, and make sure that you are a benefit to all of them by referring them to positions for which you think they are qualified, and by putting them in touch with people whom you think might help them, etc. Ask them questions about themselves and their business experience. The more you help them, the more they will be inclined to help you. 7) Don’t ask for a job! Instead, ask for advice. When you ask someone about their experience in a field, or for their advice on job searches, they are typically more generous with their time. If you are qualified for a job that they may have open, they’ll ask you to apply. 8) Mind your manners. Always follow up a conversation or meeting with your networking contacts with a thank you note or email. Also, keep the contact updated on your job search by mentioning any interviews you’ve had recently or any offers you’ve received. 9) Respect your contact’s time. Your contacts have their own responsibilities. Make sure that you respect their time by always being flexible, and by not continually asking for favors. Additionally, make sure that you do not call too often. If you’re not sure what’s too much, just ask them. 10) Be in it for the long-run. Your relationships with your networking contacts should not end when you begin a job. These should be relationships that you maintain longterm. Plan on staying in touch by arranging a monthly touch base with a few contacts where you call them or send them an email to update them on your career, and to find out if there is anything new going on in their lives. Fostering a long-term relationship can lead to further opportunity years from now.
  • NEW YORK (CNNMoney.com) -- Can&apos;t seem to find a job? Maybe you&apos;re just not looking in the right places. Because of the overwhelming number of job seekers ready to pounce on new openings, employers often bypass the big online job boards and even placement agencies, and try to fill job openings directly. Over 80% of today&apos;s jobs aren&apos;t advertised, according to Howard Poplinger, owner of human-resource company Epic Development and Evaluation. Companies are relying more heavily on their current employee networks, or on local or specialized job pools, to avoid the flood of unqualified candidates that comes with high unemployment. &amp;quot;Businesses go to employees first and ask if they know anybody,&amp;quot; Poplinger said. That way, managers don&apos;t have to go through the time-consuming process of placing an ad and sorting through applicants, he explained. With nearly 14 million people unemployed, there are more than five job seekers per opening, according to the Labor Department&apos;s most recent data. &amp;quot;Employers are definitely leaning on their employee population to get referrals for people that their employees trust,&amp;quot; said Kathy Robinson, the founder of TurningPoint, a career consulting firm in greater Boston. &amp;quot;Otherwise they have to screen thousands of applicants.&amp;quot; According to Robinson, open positions may eventually make it onto big job sites, but only after employers reach out to their employees or a select group of recruiters first. &amp;quot;The first couple of weeks is the quiet period, which is mostly word of mouth,&amp;quot; she explained. For example, one company recently reached out to Robinson, looking for qualified candidates to fill an opening for a human resources associate, which was neither posted on the company&apos;s Web site nor listed on any job boards. When employers do advertise, they are much more selective in where they post by utilizing smaller, free sites that are unique to a skill set or a specific market, according to Tig Gilliam, CEO of Adecco Group North America, a unit of the world&apos;s largest employment staffing firm. Small or mid-sized business owners, in particular, generally have more luck finding a qualified resource through a site specific to engineers in Pittsburgh, for example, rather than a major job board that caters to all types of job seekers nationwide. &amp;quot;Big job boards are of limited help for them because so many of the users aren&apos;t in the area they are recruiting,&amp;quot; he said. Uncovering hidden jobs Gilliam recommends that job seekers expand their search tools and reduce their dependency on the major job sites that have become so popular over the last decade. Remember the help wanted ads in your local paper? Gilliam suggests adding them to your search repertoire, in addition to smaller online job boards that specialize in a certain skill set, community or region. A Google search can usually bring up any job boards specific to your home town. More targeted industry listings can be found on the Web sites for professional associations and societies, such as the Software Contractors&apos; Guild or the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants. Even the local listings on Craigslist can be an asset for some job seekers. Vanchinathan Chandrasekaran found his new job on a Florida Craigslist site. When Chandrasekaran, 25, was looking for a job he said the response rate from Craigslist far exceeded that from the more popular job search sites. &amp;quot;Though the companies were small, I was happy that someone was looking into my résumé,&amp;quot; he said. Soon, Chandrasekaran found a position as a software developer with a firm in Boca Raton through a Craigslist ad and started his new job in January. According to career experts, there are also ways to tap into a company&apos;s network to find out about openings, even if the positions are never advertised publicly. Robinson suggests that job seekers &amp;quot;dig deeper when thinking of connections&amp;quot; at choice companies. Joining local networking groups for your profession or LinkedIn may uncover a connection to an employee at the company -- such as sharing the same alma mater -- which could be the foot in the door you need, she said. Joining a company&apos;s community online, through sites like Facebook and Twitter may also provide access to openings before the general public. Without an &amp;quot;in&amp;quot; at the employer of choice, job seekers can still gain an advantage by contacting the company directly, even if there are no open positions posted. When it comes to finding out about jobs that are unadvertised, it often boils down to &amp;quot;knocking on doors,&amp;quot; Poplinger said. Have you found a job recently? We want to hear from you. Send us an email and attach a photo. Tell us where you got hired and how you landed the job and you could be profiled in an upcoming story on CNNMoney.com. For the CNNMoney.com Comment Policy, click here .   First Published: June 10, 2009: 11:30 AM ET
  • Networking for Success Thomas Brooks Many of us network well in social settings, but miss opportunities for networking to advance our careers or entrepreneurial endeavors. This article will give you a guide to networking success. Key 1 - Have a Strategic Plan: Figure out your career or entrepreneurial goals, and then put in place a networking plan and list of desired relationships to make it happen. For example, if you want to be U. S. Surgeon General, you could start by making a list of politicians, executives at the Center for Disease Control, AMA leaders and even former surgeon generals that you want to meet. As you make progress in your career, continually revise your goals, and your list of desired networking contacts. If you have an aggressive goal (e.g. CEO of a Fortune 500 firm, raising $50 million in venture capital), you have to network above your current peer group. Don’t take on a snobbish attitude with your current peers, but stretch yourself to meet the “ high flyers”. Key 2 – Have a Giving Mindset: Before you begin the execution of your strategic plan, take on a sincere, giving mindset. Be ready to give, help, or facilitate. The goal of your networking efforts should not be immediate gain for yourself. For example in job searching, don’t lead with your resume; set up 15 minute phone meeting, or better yet a meeting in person with the hiring manager. The outcome of the meeting may be that the job is not right for you, and that you may give the hiring manager a lead for the person that is eventually hired. Now, you have helped two people, the hiring manager and the newly hired employee. You have grown your sphere of influence, which will benefit you in the long run. Key 3 - Show Up: You have to get out there. Take advantage of receptions and events held by organizations in which you are a member. Better yet, go to functions of organizations where you can find the “high flyers” on your strategic list (see Key #1). Since you have to eat anyway, use meals to move relationships forward (kind of like dating). For example, if you are new to your company’s marketing department, have lunch with the engineering manager. Or, instead of eating dinner alone, attend a reception that serves hors d&apos;oeuvres to make good use of your valuable time. When you get there, make sure you are prepared. This means that you not only have a business card, but you also know what you have to offer (Key #2) to the people that you want to meet. Know your approach, so that you are confident as you break the ice. Make relevant conversation, and then close smoothly without monopolizing the other person’s entire evening. Don’t leave the conversation without a reason to follow up (Key #7). Key 4 - Don’t Be Afraid to Ask: As you already know, the worst thing that can happen when you ask is that you get a “no” as a response. If you approach each interaction with a giving attitude, and build a relationship first, you will be in a stronger position before you ask for help. Find a connection first, even if it is something as simple as the fact that you both grew up in the same state. Also, when you ask for something, make it easy for the person to say yes. For example, if you have a mentor, don’t ask her to get you promoted in six months, but do ask her to coach you on how you can develop the skills that will make you more likely to be promoted by the various managers in the company. Key 5 - Be a “Thought Leader”: You want to have something intriguing to say at all of these lunches, dinners and networking receptions. Strive to be a “thought leader,” especially in your particular field. When you have something interesting to say, people will remember you when you follow up with them later. Also, once you are recognized as a thought leader, you should get yourself placed as a speaker or panel discussion participant at conferences and workshops. This is free PR to build your individual &amp;quot;brand&amp;quot;, and will enhance your scope of influence in your field. Also, it is very easy to network when people are approaching you after your speech. Key 6 - Volunteer Locally: With a sincere, giving mindset, get involved locally in a way that’s congruent with your strategic plan. Eventually, you want to get on the organization’s board. For example, I have a real passion for reaching back to help inner city youth. Thus, I have worked for about 8 years as a volunteer in Houston, Dallas and Atlanta in the Leaders of Tomorrow (LOT) teen mentoring program. The LOT program is sponsored by the National Black MBA Association (NBMBAA). Eventually, I became a board member of NBMBAA-Atlanta, which allowed me to meet an eventual business partner for our online business (www.MinorityProfessionalNetwork.com). Of course, I did not know I would meet an eventual business partner in Atlanta when I started the volunteer effort in Houston back in 1995. But, it did make strategic sense for me to do my volunteer work under the umbrella of a professional organization of high flyers (NBMBAA) rather than though another community organization. Key 7 - Have a Reason to Follow Up: When you meet a high flyer that fits your strategic plan, do not leave the conservation without a reason to follow up. Usually this reason should be based on something you can volunteer to do to help them. For example, if you are a young med student and you meet your U.S. congressman at a reception, ask for his card so that you can volunteer for the next campaign. Or, tell the congressman about your friend who edits an online news webzine that might want to do an interview about the congressman’s education bill. Remember, the goal of your networking efforts should not be immediate gain for yourself. Ten years later, that same congressman may be in a position to help you get on an important public policy committee as you pursue your goal of being Surgeon General (see previous example). Before you follow up, ask the person how they would like you to follow up (e.g. some people prefer a phone call on Friday morning, and some prefer e-mail). Key 8 - Follow Up: Always follow up. They “high flyers” that you want in your sphere of influence meet many people every day. Some follow up, but most don’t. And when you do follow up, remember to be courteous to the person that answers the phone. It may be a secretary whose intention is to screen all calls. Be ready to give a compelling reason why the high flyer should return your call. For example, “ The congressman asked me to give him a call to help facilitate an interview with a key reporter who happens to be a friend of mine. The interview may result in coverage of the congressman’s reelection bid.” In summary, don’t forget that networking can take place anywhere, at any time. So, be prepared and make sure you bring something to the table. Bring a business card, too. Like any other important activity, you should practice. Always be genuin
  • Get out there Be an activist Aim carefully Make others feel like a million Have a patience Work at it
  • Get out there Be an activist Aim carefully Make others feel like a million Have a patience Work at it
  • Breaking Ice: If you&apos;re surrounded by familiar faces, then you will appear less approachable than someone who is flying solo or talking to one other person. With networking, the name of the game is to connect with people you don&apos;t know or solidify relationships with people you don&apos;t know well. You can strike up a conversation by asking an open-ended question. &amp;quot;What did you think of the speaker?&amp;quot; or &amp;quot;How long have you been part of this organization?&amp;quot; will go further than a yes-or-no question like &amp;quot;Come to these often?&amp;quot; or &amp;quot;Can I borrow your pen?&amp;quot; A simple &amp;quot;Hello, how are you?&amp;quot; works well, too. People love to talk about themselves, so showing genuine interest will start you off on the right foot. Building your network By offering to help the other person first before you ask her for a favor, you show generosity and a willingness to collaborate. That gesture will ensure a positive, mutually helpful relationship in the future. She had already published two books, and I was still trying to build my writing portfolio, but she was happy to chat with me because she said my enthusiasm kept her inspired when she was feeling overwhelmed or uninspired.
  • Prepare an &amp;quot;elevator speech: Write a summary of what you want people to know about you that can. Use your existing ties : Start by tapping existing contacts including friends, family and ex colleagues. Target trade groups. Join the dominant trade or industry group in your area. Show Interest In others. Stop focusing on yourself and take an interest in the other person. Don&apos;t ask for a job. It may force the other person to say no to you. Instead, seek advice Don&apos;t be selfish. No matter how desperate you are, remember networking is a two way street. Don&apos;t abuse relationships. There&apos;s no rule here for how many phone calls are too many Follow through . Nothing can kill a budding relationship faster than not writing a proper thank you note. Prepare an &amp;quot;elevator speech.&amp;quot; Write a summary of what you want people to know about you that can be delivered in less than 30 seconds. Make it upbeat and succinct: who you are, what you do, what you&apos;re looking for. More than that, and you risk turning off the listener, says Debra Condren, a career coach and business psychologist with offices in New York and San Francisco. Since you get only one chance to make a first impression, she recommends practicing your elevator speech in front of a mirror, and then on friends, before taking it to a networking event. Use your existing ties. Start by tapping existing contacts including friends, family and ex colleagues. Spread the word that you&apos;re looking for a job and ask if anyone has a contact who might be able to offer advice. Then make sure to ask every person you meet for two or three more referrals. (&amp;quot;Do you know anyone else who might be helpful for me to meet?&amp;quot; can be an effective question.) Target trade groups. Don&apos;t waste time at big events catering to people in many industries. Join the dominant trade or industry group in your area. Preferably, it should have a barrier to entry, at least a membership fee. Consider volunteering on one of the group&apos;s committees, to meet members. Show Interest In others. Career experts say the secret is to stop focusing on yourself and take an interest in the other person. Ask questions and get the contacts to talk about themselves and their business experience. This is easier than you might think. Don&apos;t ask for a job. It may force the other person to say no to you. Instead, seek advice, says Dan Strakal, co author of &amp;quot;Better Job Search in 3 Easy Steps&amp;quot; and owner of Success Positioning Systems, an Albuquerque, N.M., career services firm. People are likelier to be generous with their time, if you ask for their counsel. Don&apos;t worry. If you seem qualified for an opening, they&apos;ll refer you to the right person to set up an Interview. Build relationships. Strangers won&apos;t put their reputations on the line for you. Build ties with a new contact before asking for help. Consider dropping a personal note to any new contact you meet at an industry event. Then follow up perhaps with a helpful article or introduction to someone you know. Don&apos;t be selfish. No matter how desperate you are, remember networking is a two way street. If&apos; you&apos;ve met with a recruiter, you, can always offer to introduce him to the smartest people you know in your industry, says Melanie Mulhall, a career coach and corporate consultant in Broomfield, Colo. If you are a young job seeker with, little experience, you may not be able to help a finance chief land his next position but his daughter might be applying to colleges and want to hear your take of a school. Don&apos;t abuse relationships. There&apos;s no rule here for how many phone calls are too many. Just try to gauge if you&apos;re coming across as always looking for a favor. Follow through. Nothing can kill a budding relationship faster than not writing a proper thank you note. In many cases, you can e mail it, but don&apos;t assume the content is any less important than in snail mail. A three line message with a smiley face won&apos;t cut it. Keep the other person abreast of how your meeting went with someone he or she referred you to. Maintain your network. Cultivate ties even when you aren&apos;t job hunting. Remember, the majority of jobs go unpublished, so you may hear of an exciting opportunity. Stacey L. Bradford is an associate editor of SmartMoney.com . E mail: [email_address]
  • 1) Prepare an elevator pitch. Data shows that when you initially meet someone, their first impression of you is formed within the first two minutes they spend with you. After that first impression is formed, it is extremely difficult for it to be changed . A 30-second elevator pitch should be a part of every professional’s job search arsenal, including yours, for this very reason. An elevator pitch is a quick speech that you have memorized in case you ever meet someone who you need to make a good, professional impression on. It is also a great starting point for beginning a conversation with employers at job fairs, or as a way of summarizing yourself at the beginning of an interview. Make it upbeat, and to the point, stating who you are, what you do and what you’re looking for. For additional information on elevator pitches, check out First Impressions: How to Deliver a Professional 30-second Elevator Pitch from the September 18, 2007 issue of TechNews.
  • Networking

    1. 1. Ali O. Oncel Geophysicist Networking
    2. 2. Networking: What is it? <ul><li>“ Networking is the deliberate process of exchanging information, resources, support and access in such a way as to create mutually beneficial relationships for personal and professional success ”. </li></ul>
    3. 3. Hidden Jobs <ul><li>80% of all available jobs aren’t posted in the classifieds or on job boards. </li></ul><ul><li>60% of people surveyed by BH Careers International , said they got their last job by networking </li></ul>
    4. 4. Context <ul><li>Literature Review </li></ul><ul><li>Networking Tips </li></ul><ul><li>Electronic Networking </li></ul>
    5. 5. Recent Publications
    6. 6. Context <ul><li>Literature Review </li></ul><ul><li>Networking Tips </li></ul><ul><li>Electronic Networking </li></ul>
    7. 7. Source :http://www.marketitwrite.com/images/crains.pdf
    8. 9. Tips for no-pain networking
    9. 10. Top Networking Tips <ul><li>Prepare an &quot;elevator speech“ </li></ul><ul><li>Use your existing ties </li></ul><ul><li>Target trade groups </li></ul><ul><li>Show Interest In others </li></ul><ul><li>Don't ask for a job </li></ul><ul><li>Build relationships </li></ul><ul><li>Don't be selfish </li></ul><ul><li>Don't abuse relationships </li></ul><ul><li>Follow through </li></ul><ul><li>Maintain your network </li></ul>Source : http://www.nmc.edu/careers/support/networking.html
    10. 11. Elevator Pitch Data shows that when you initially meet someone, their first impression of you is formed within the first two minutes they spend with you. After that first impression is formed, it is extremely difficult for it to be changed .
    11. 12. Context <ul><li>Literature Review </li></ul><ul><li>Networking Tips </li></ul><ul><li>Web 2 - Networking </li></ul>
    12. 13. <ul><li>&quot; Web 2.0 &quot; refers to what is perceived as a second generation of web development and web design . It has led to the development and evolution of web-based communities, hosted services , and web applications . Examples include social-networking sites , video-sharing sites , wikis , blogs , mashups and folksonomies . </li></ul>Web 2.0 Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Web_2.0
    13. 14. WIKI <ul><li>A wiki is a website that uses wiki software , allowing the easy creation and editing of any number of interlinked Web pages , using a simplified markup language or a WYSIWYG text editor, within the browser. [1] [2] Wikis are often used to create collaborative websites , to power community websites, and for note taking . </li></ul>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wiki
    14. 15. Course Management
    15. 16. Project Management
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