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Leveraging social media

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Talk given to the Canadian Bar Association on June 25, 2014

Talk given to the Canadian Bar Association on June 25, 2014

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Leveraging social media Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Speakers: Omar Ha-Redeye, Fleet Street Law Lisa Stam, Koldorf Stam LLP Leveraging Social Media in Your Practice June 25th, 2014 CBA L.@.W. SERIES
  • 2. 2 Co-Presenters: Omar Ha-Redeye, Lawyer Fleet Street Law Lisa Stam, Partner Koldorf Stam LLP
  • 3. 3 Outline of Presentation  Introduction  WHY Incorporate Social Media into Practice?  HOW to Incorporate Social Media into Practice?  Conclusion  Questions?
  • 4. 4 WHY Incorporate Social Media into Your Practice? Four Main Focuses of Social Media  Client Development  Professional Responsibilities to Educate the Public  Reputation Management  Your Professional Development
  • 5. 5 1. Client Development Client Development  Word of mouth has always been the main source of referrals • Not enough, you want to remain at the top of the mind  To be on the top of the mind of your target market you must be memorable • Cannot be memorable without being noticed  Economic challenges have increased competition, including in law • Must differentiate ourselves to remain relevant • Being a great lawyer isn’t enough in today’s market  Level Playing Field – the new world of online opportunity • Clients are looking for relevant and practical expertise, not just an established firm
  • 6. 6 1. Client Development (cont’d) Client Development (cont’d)  How to do this? • Seek out and identify opportunities in workplace, among friends, acquaintances and networks • Speaking and writing opportunities help disseminate to broader audience • Leadership positions in organizations creates great visibility • Community service creates bonds with like‐minded people • Show your personality; be real and authentic • Social Media!!
  • 7. 7 1. Client Development (cont’d) Some Social Media Sites  Facebook  Twitter  LinkedIn  Instagram  Tumblr
  • 8. 8 1. Client Development (cont’d)  Blogs,  Blogs, and  Blogs:  Build an online body of expertise  Platform doesn’t matter (WordPress, LexBlog, firm website blogs, etc.)  Be Google-able for your expertise
  • 9. 9 1. Client Development (cont’d)  Smartphones allow for constant connectivity to Social Media  Constant connectivity to you  Social Media is NOT just for the young Image(s): http://www.inventionmachine.com/Portals/56687/images/SocialMediaConnect.jpg http://socialmediatoday.com/sites/socialmediatoday.com/files/imagepicker/219241/social-media-best-practices.jpg
  • 10. 10 1. Client Development (cont’d) Source: http://www.inc.com/news/articles/2010/08/users-over-50-are-fastest-growing-social-media-demographic.html
  • 11. 11 1. Client Development (cont’d) NO ONE USES THE YELLOW PAGES ANYMORE. Image: http://www.chrishiggins.in/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/remember-yellow-pages.jpg
  • 12. 12 2. Professional Responsibility Ha-Redeye, Omar and Tarantino, Bob, Overview: The Rules of Professional Conduct and Their Application to the Legal Profession Online (and Off) (March 1, 2012). Internet and E-Commerce Law in Canada, Vol. 12, No. 11, March 2012. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2140435 Professional Responsibility  As Legal Professionals, we have a duty to educate the public  Rule 6.01 of Ontario’s Rules of Professional Conduct  Rule 2.1-1 and 2.1-2 of the Model Code of Professional Conduct  Integrity of the profession requires education of the public
  • 13. 13 2. Professional Responsibility (cont’d)  Online civility is of utmost importance  Consider Rule 4.01(6) of Ontario’s Rules of Professional Conduct and Rule 7.2-1 of the Model Code of Professional Conduct.  Must avoid flaming
  • 14. 14 2. Professional Responsibility (cont’d) Other Rules to be vigilant of:  All rules relating to marketing under Rule 3.02 of the Ontario Rules of Professional Conduct and Rule 4.2-1 of the Model Code of Professional Conduct  A lawyer may market professional services, provided that the marketing is: • (a) demonstrably true, accurate and verifiable; • (b) neither misleading, confusing or deceptive, nor likely to mislead, confuse or deceive; • (c) in the best interests of the public and consistent with a high standard of professionalism.  Definition of competence under Rule 2.01 (1)(k) of the Ontario Rules of Professional Conduct and 3.1-1(k) of the Model Code of Professional Conduct  “competent lawyer” means a lawyer who has and applies relevant skills, attributes, and values in a manner appropriate to each matter undertaken on behalf of a client including … • (k) adapting to changing professional requirements, standards, techniques, and practices.
  • 15. 15 2. Professional Responsibility (cont’d)  Consider also including a policy on social media usage in your employee handbook. Source: http://www.intersectionconsulting.com/2010/social-media-overlap/
  • 16. 16 3. Reputation Management Reputation Management  You must be in control of your reputation online  Key danger with no online presence are rating sites  Your online reputation can be a game changer – a real opportunity or a disaster
  • 17. 17 3. Reputation Management (cont’d) Source: http://www.ripoffreport.com/r/lawyerratingzcom/internet/lawyerratingzcom-Their-reports-are-not-honest-they-selectively-edit-out-reports-Interne-1052236
  • 18. 18 3. Reputation Management (cont’d)  With no online presence, there is no counter balance to disgruntled clients.  Judges are especially vulnerable to disgruntled online commentary.  Its impact can last for years.
  • 19. 19 3. Reputation Management (cont’d) Google Search 2011
  • 20. 20 3. Reputation Management (cont’d) Google Search 2014
  • 21. 21 3. Reputation Management (cont’d) Opportunities through good reputation management:  Develop expertise  Develop practice you want, not just what your firm provides  Raise profile with media, conference organizers, industry leaders, and other online amplifiers
  • 22. 22 4. Your Professional Development Your Professional Development:  Stay on top of current legal developments  Join online conversations of case law and legal issues (or at least listen to those that really get into it)  Learn from your peers
  • 23. 23 HOW to Incorporate Social Media into Your Practice How to Incorporate Social Media into your practice:  No, you do not need to be on Facebook five hours a day;  No, you do not need to create a huge marketing department;  No, you do not need to be particularly clever, witty or eloquent (although a bit of humour and/or modesty doesn’t hurt)
  • 24. 24 HOW to Incorporate Social Media into Your Practice (cont’d)  HOW:  Find time savers: • Do spend the time to set up an infrastructure that will in part take care of itself • Use tools that curate info for you, and that filter out the noise: – e.g. RSS feeders, TweetDeck, Hootsuite, Flipboard, etc. – Set up lists and groups in your feeds – Use scheduled tweets, posts, etc.
  • 25. 25 HOW to Incorporate Social Media into Your Practice (cont’d)  HOW:  Find time savers (cont’d): • Delegate what you can, but don’t ghost write everything • Focus on your area, not everything out there • You don’t have extra time - and neither do your peers and clients, so keep it concise and brief
  • 26. 26 HOW to Incorporate Social Media into Your Practice (cont’d) How to be good at social media:  Listen to others first  Go where the conversations are  Collaborate and share info  Be professional, but don’t take yourself so seriously  Focus on expertise, not just volume of activity
  • 27. 27 Conclusion  Social Media is an inevitability of modern legal practice.  Lawyers have a responsibility to learn how to use it properly.  However, we must be aware of pitfalls and limitations to this emerging form of communication  BUT – there are so many opportunities – jump in and participate or let the opportunities pass you by…
  • 28. 28 Questions?  Do people take law societies seriously on social media?  How involved should law societies be with social media?  Should we even care about how lawyers behave on social media?  Should law societies regulate social media behaviour?  If so, what would be appropriate remedies? Microsoft ClipArt
  • 29. 29 Experience the CBA ADVANTAGE! www.cbapd.org/National