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IB AISA Brochure
IB AISA Brochure
IB AISA Brochure
IB AISA Brochure
IB AISA Brochure
IB AISA Brochure
IB AISA Brochure
IB AISA Brochure
IB AISA Brochure
IB AISA Brochure
IB AISA Brochure
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IB AISA Brochure

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  • 1. THE IB DIPLOMA PROGRAMME AT AISA
  • 2. AISA CONTENTS AISA Mission Statement .....................................................................................................3 What is the International Baccalaureate Diploma? .............................................................4 Why take the IB Diploma? ...................................................................................................5 Advantages of the IB Diploma ............................................................................................5 What to expect? ..................................................................................................................5 Earning the Diploma ............................................................................................................6 Subject Areas..................................................................................................................7-11 Page 2
  • 3. AISA Mission StatementOur mission at the American International School in Abu Dhabi is to produce reflective,responsible, independent and respectful students, who possess strong global citizenship, integrityand an appreciation for lifelong learning. Through our academic and extra-curricular programswe strive to provide a quality education that gives students the ability to reach their full potential,both academically and personally, and to make a worthwhile contribution to society. TheAmerican International School works in partnership with parents and the local community toaspire to this mission. Page 3
  • 4. AISA What is the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme?The International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme is a rigorous pre-university course of studies,leading to examinations, which fulfills the needs of highly motivated secondary school students between theages of 16 and 19 years. Designed as a comprehensive two-year curriculum that allows its graduates tocomplete requirements of various national education systems, the Diploma model is based on the patternof no single country but incorporates the best elements of many.The curriculum is displayed in the shape of a hexagon with six academic areas surrounding the core.Subjects are studied concurrently and students are exposed to the two great traditions of learning: thehumanities and the sciences. Page 4
  • 5. AISA Why take the IB Diploma? There are many reasons that students choose to participate in the IB Diploma Programme. Some find that IB offers them a challenge, and others choose it because it fulfils their home country’s university requirements. However, all of the participants join because of the preparation that it gives them for university. Many times students will be offered advanced placement or standing in university for their IB Diploma or Certificate achievements because the Diploma Programme is recognized for its rigorous academic requirements. Advantages of IB Diploma 1. The Diploma Programme provides a more well-balanced course of study, which allows the opportunity for specialization while still ensuring broad academic exposure. 2. Globally, the curriculum follows a uniform structure. 3. The IB Diploma is recognized in over 120 countries for university entrance. 4. Students who feel the full diploma does not fit their needs may opt for certificate opportunities which add to the quality of their college and university résumé. What to expect As stated earlier, the IB Diploma Programme is rigorous. Therefore, as a prospective IB Candidate you can expect to: • Learn and use sound time management skills. IB is not an honors program, but your success largely depends on your ability to organize your time. • Seek assistance when necessary. You will have to build strong working relationships with staff, administration and your peers. • Be responsible and motivated, your levels of responsibility and motivation are also keys to your success in IB. • Get to know your school and local community. • Learn from peers as well as professionals. • Prioritize. IB takes much of your time outside school, but if you can prioritize, you can continue most of your extra-curricular activities. Page 5
  • 6. AISA Earning the Diploma IB grading differs from the traditional High School format. Instead of percentages, IB classes are graded on a point scale of 1 (minimum) to 7 (maximum). Then there are three other points offered for CAS, TOK and Extended Essay. This makes the maximum total of points that a student can earn 45. 6 subjects x 7 + 3 bonus = 45 points Extended Essay and TOK are graded on a letter scale of A (Excellent) to E (Elementary). If a student earns an E in TOK or on the Extended Essay, at least 24 points must be awarded to earn the diploma. Two E grades for these components means non-completion of the diploma. There are other conditions to completion of the diploma which can be discussed in greater detail with the IB Diploma Programme Coordinator. Page 6
  • 7. AISA Subject AreasGroup 1 is composed of more than eighty languages. All students must study a Language A1 from this group. TheLanguage A1 programme is a literature course studied in the first language of the student or the language in which thestudent is most competent. This will normally be the language of the environment to which the student has been exposedfrom an early age or for an extended period. Currently AISA only offers A1 in English. English The English A1 programme is primarily a pre-university course in literature. It is aimed at students who intend to pursue literature, or related studies, at university, as well as at students whose formal study of literature will not continue beyond this level. The former would normally follow the Higher Level (HL) programme and the latter the Standard Level (SL).Group 2 consists of a broad spectrum of modern language courses. The main emphasis of the modern language coursesis on language acquisition and usage, from the comparatively elementary, practical usage at ab initio level to thesophisticated usage of the near-native (or bilingual) speaker who is studying a language A2. In between are the language Bcourses. Spanish Ab Initio The Spanish ab initio course is a language learning course for beginners, designed to be followed over two years by students who have no previous experience of learning Spanish. The main focus of the course is on the acquisition of language required for purposes and situations usual in everyday social interaction. Language ab initio courses are only available at standard level. Language ab initio courses aim to develop a variety of linguistic skills, and a basic awareness of the culture(s) using the language, through the study of a core syllabus and language-specific syllabuses. French B Available at both higher and standard levels, this course occupies the middle ground of the group 2 modern languages spectrum. This is a language learning course for students with some previous experience of learning the target language. The main focus of French B is on language acquisition and the development of skills considerably beyond those expected of an ab initio candidate, up to a fairly sophisticated degree at higher level. Language B courses give students the opportunity to reach a high degree of competence in a language and explore the culture(s) using the language. The range of purposes and situations for which and in which the language is used extends well beyond those at ab initio, to the domains of work, social relationships, and the discussion of abstract ideas. The type of language needed for these purposes and situations are more refined. Arabic A2 This program is designed for study at both higher and standard levels by speakers with a high level of competence in the target language. The program combines both literature and language components and primarily meets the needs of students who are bilingual or have lived in a country where the language is spoken and are beyond the foreign learner stage. The course aims to develop a variety of linguistic skills through the study of a wide range of texts to promote appreciation of the wealth and subtleties of the language and to facilitate the clear expression of ideas. It develops students’ powers of expression in both oral and written communication and provides opportunities of practicing and developing skills in writing and speaking in a variety of styles and situations. It also develops students’ ability to engage in close, detailed and critical examination of text. Page 7
  • 8. AISA Subject AreasGroup 3 is concerned with the relationship between individual and society. Subjects included in this groupspan the humanities and social sciences. An essential characteristic of the disciplines in Group 3 is that theirsubject matter is contestable and that their study requires students to tolerate some uncertainty. Studies of localsituations and of global perspectives foster an appreciation of change and continuity as well as of similarity anddifference. Students evaluate the major theories, concepts and research findings of the respective disciplines andlearn each disciplines methodology. Business and Management is the rigorous and critical study of the ways in which individuals and groups interact in a dynamic business environment. It is an academic discipline that examines how business decisions are made and how these decisions make an impact on internal and external environments. The ideals of international cooperation and responsible citizenship are at the heart of business and management. The programme is designed to give students an understanding of business principles, practices and skills. Emphasis is also placed on understanding technical innovation and day-to-day business functions of marketing, human resource management and finance. Economics is a dynamic social science, forming part of the study of individuals and societies. The study of economics is essentially about the concept of scarcity and the problem of resource allocation. Although economics involves the formulation of theory, it is not a purely theoretical subject: economic theories can be applied to real-world examples. Neither is economics a discrete subject, since it incorporates elements of history, geography, psychology, sociology, political studies and many other related fields of study. History from an international perspective is increasingly important today. In the contemporary context, one of globalization and technological development, different cultures and societies are increasingly in contact and interdependent. Now, more than ever, there is a need for an understanding of the present as well as the past. The aim of History in the Diploma Programme is to explain trends and developments, continuity and change through time and through individual events. The course is concerned with individuals and societies in the widest context: political, social, economic, religious, technological and cultural. Page 8
  • 9. AISA Subject AreasGroup 4 is the experimental sciences. Experimental science subjects promote an understanding of theconcepts, principles and applications of the respective disciplines, together with an appreciation of themethodology of the experimental sciences in general. Students develop practical laboratory skills as well as theability to work collaboratively through participating in an interdisciplinary group project. A commoncurriculum model applies to all subjects in Group 4. This model offers a parallel structure at both higher andstandard levels whereby all candidates study a core of material which is supplemented by various options.Examination of local and international examples helps students develop an awareness of moral and ethicalissues and promotes social responsibility. Biology gives the student the knowledge and understanding of biological principles. Core components are ecological and evolution, genetics, and human health and physiology. These examine the universality of life, relationship between structure and function, and equilibrium within systems and evolution. Options can include neurobiology and behavior, ecology and conservation, and evolution. Chemistry develops practical and investigative skills as well as offering theoretical study. The essential principles of Chemistry, such as stoichemistry, bonding, equilibrium, and states of matter, are covered. Options, such as environmental chemistry, medicine and drugs, fuels and energy, and modern analytical chemistry, let the teacher and students pursue other areas of interest. Physics studies all matter, from sub-atomic particles to the entire universe. It has a greater use of mathematics than the other sciences. Included in the core are waves, mechanics, atomic and nuclear physics, electricity and magnetism, and thermal physics. Options include astrophysics, optics, and relativity. Page 9
  • 10. AISA Subject AreasGroup 5 includes the mathematical subjects. All candidates for a diploma are required to complete amathematics course, and options are available to cater for different abilities and levels of student interest. Eachcourse aims to deepen a students understanding of mathematics as a discipline and to promote confidence andfacility in the use of mathematical language. Mathematics HL is designed for students with competence and a strong background in mathematics. Some students will choose to study the subject because they have a genuine interest in mathematics and enjoy meeting its challenges and problems. Others elect the higher-level course to prepare for additional mathematics studies at university or because they need mathematics for related subjects such as physics, engineering and technology. Mathematics SL is designed to provide a background of mathematical thought and a reasonable level of technical ability for those not wishing to take mathematics at the higher level. It is intended to provide a sound mathematical basis for those students planning to pursue further studies in fields such as chemistry, economics, geography and business administration. It is a demanding course containing a variety of mathematical topics. Mathematical Studies SL is designed to provide a realistic option for students with varied backgrounds and abilities who are not likely to require mathematics beyond the Diploma Programme. Students develop the skills needed to cope with the mathematical demands of a technological society; they also apply mathematics to real-life situations. A substantial piece of personal research, in the form of a project, is a requirement of the course. Page 10
  • 11. AISA Subject AreasGroup 6 is the arts and electives. This includes visual arts, with emphasis placed on practical production bythe student and exploration of a range of creative work in a global context. As an option, instead of a Group 6subject, a candidate may select an additional subject from Group 3 or Group 4.Visual Arts the course encourages an active exploration of visual arts within the students’ own and othercultural contexts. The study of visual arts and the journey within it encourages students to: develop anunderstanding of visual arts from a local, national and international perspective, build confidence in respondingvisually and creatively to personal and cultural experiences, develop skills in, and sensitivity to, the creation ofworks that reflect active and individual involvement, and take responsibility for the direction of their learningthrough the acquisition of effective working practices. Page 11

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