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Keeping employee's engaged in difficult times

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  • 1. Keeping Employee’s Engaged in Difficult Times Lori M. Smith, Capstone Coaching & Consulting, Inc. Nikki Novotney Rieck, Strategic Programs, Inc.
  • 2. Session Overview • A Few Basics About Engagement • What Are We Seeing In The Workplace Right Now? • Ways To Re-engage Dis-engaged Employees • The OD Network: Future Focus
  • 3. Starting Close to Home What does it mean to be engaged in your work? What helps keep you engaged?
  • 4. What is Engagement?  Engaged Employees:  consistently speak positively about the organization to coworkers, potential employees, and customers  have an intense desire to be a member of the organization despite opportunities to work elsewhere  exerts extra time, effort, and initiative to contribute to business success ―Employee engagement is about translating employee potential into employee performance and business success.‖ Melcrum Report Source: Employee Engagement, How to build a high-performance workforce. Melcrum Publishing, 2005.
  • 5. Why is Engagement Important to Your Organization?  Multiple studies show a correlation between levels of engagement and business performance (Gallup, Towers Perrin, Great Places to Work, International Survey Research)  Engagement studies reveal companies with higher percentages of highly engaged employees also have:  Strong customer-focused organizations  Increased retention, decreased absenteeism and staff turnover  Better financial performance: (Revenue growth (Towers Perrin), Operating Margin And Net Profit Margin (1999, 2001 ISR), Total Shareholder Return (2003, Hewitt), Stock Market Performance (2002, The Frank Russell company) Source: Employee Engagement, How to build a high-performance workforce. Melcrum Publishing, 2005.
  • 6. Engagement Measures a Composite:  The words and actions of senior management  The words and actions of direct supervisors  Informal recognition of work well done  Clarity around one‘s roles and responsibilities  An equitable basic workplace environment  Clear and regular communication  The opportunity to develop skills and talents  Belief in the future of the company  Formal reward and recognition Source: Employee Engagement, How to build a high-performance workforce. Melcrum Publishing, 2005.
  • 7. Top 6 Drivers Of Employee Engagement  Actions of Senior leadership  Actions of Direct supervisors  Opportunities for career advancement  Belief in vision, values and strategy  Fostering of people culture  Compensation and benefits Source: Employee Engagement, How to build a high-performance workforce. Melcrum Publishing, 2005. p. 59, North America.
  • 8. Employee Engagement Cycle Fully Engaged Passive Commitment Active Evaluation Complete
  • 9. Impact of Loss of Engagement & Turnover Financial Organizational performance Customer dissatisfaction Loss of competitive edge Reduced safety Decreased quality
  • 10. What Are We Seeing Right Now? Reactions to the Recession In your organizations? 72% of companies have reduced their workforce in response to the recession (Towers Perrin) The number of actively disengaged workers has gone from 3% to 24% in organizations who have laid off workers (Gallup) Source: Re-Engage Disengaged Employees, Alison Davis, SHRM website
  • 11. Reactions to the Recession 47% of high performers are looking to leave their jobs when the economy picks up Only 18% of low performers want to leave Source: Leadership IQ.com
  • 12. Engagement Factors 50 40 30 Frequency Count 20 10 0 Source: Research by Strategic Programs, Inc.
  • 13. Importance vs. Performance 4.00 3.50 3.00 Importance 2.50 Performance 2.00 1.50 1.00 Source: Research by Strategic Programs, Inc.
  • 14. Top 6 Drivers Of Employee Engagement Listed in order of impact:  Actions of Senior leadership  Actions of Direct supervisors  Opportunities for career advancement  Belief in vision, values and strategy  Fostering of people culture  Compensation and benefits Source: Employee Engagement, How to build a high-performance workforce. Melcrum Publishing, 2005. p. 59, North America.
  • 15. Ways to Re-engage Dis-engaged Employees • Your thoughts • Ask team members (customers) what engages them and then take meaningful action – 1 on 1 • Talk with your team members—ask them what they need to be successful? what drives them crazy? Determine what is actionable and then follow through • Create ownership for the work and for success • Help team members see how their work contributes to the overall success of the business and to the customer • Find meaning in your work – how does it contribute to the overall good?
  • 16. Ways to Re-engage Dis-engaged Employees • Use the ―Swiffer Strategy‖ – find ways to look at the same ‗ole problems from a new perspective – ask those closest to the work • Focus on using team member‘s strengths – and leveraging strengths of the whole team to get the work done • Get team members more information – and deliver it face-to- face and in small doses, more often • Use Skype—or other ways to add faces to virtual meetings • Use social media to help employees connect across the organization – Best Buy Blue Shirt Nation
  • 17. Ways to Re-engage Dis-engaged Employees • Take a personal approach -- get to know one another • Use f2f recognition, at least once a week within your team • Increase ownership for the results • Expect team members to contribute • Invest in your people – if you don‘t have $, invest time • Find humor – appropriately of course • Uncover the collective genius of your team members – they just might surprise you
  • 18. The Role of Senior Leaders in Building Engagement The top six most important actions for senior leaders to build employee engagement: 1. Communicate a clear vision 70% 2. Build trust in the organization 46% 3. Involve employees in decision making that 40% will affect them 4. Demonstrate commitment to the company‘s values 39% 5. Being seen to respond to feedback 33% 6. Demonstrate genuine commitment to 28% employees‘ well being Source: Employee Engagement, How to build a high-performance workforce. Melcrum Publishing, 2005.
  • 19. How Organizations Measure the Impact of Engagement Efforts  By evaluating fluctuations in our employee survey scores 55%  By evaluating anecdotal feedback from employees through 49% focus groups, online forums, etc…  By observing employees‘ willingness to participate in 32% company programs  By observing increases in employees‘ receptiveness to change 29%  By analyzing other data in the business, 29% i.e. profitability, retention, etc..)  Through other means 4%  We do not formally measure the impact of our engagement 32% endeavors at this time Source: Employee Engagement, How to build a high-performance workforce. Melcrum Publishing, 2005.
  • 20. Board Planning Retreat • Held in mid-September • Included past, present and future board membership • Used several sources for planning: – Historical context of who we are – Vision – Purpose – Results of Member Survey • SOAR Analysis • Goal Setting
  • 21. Where Omaha OD Network is Going: Our Focus for 2010-2015 Four Key Areas in Five Years: • Create multiple avenues to help members explore, learn and apply OD methods, tools and techniques. • To be the preferred source for our members by providing education about leading edge topics incorporated into programs and professional development. • Create a 5-year plan for creating a more robust website. • Create increased awareness with senior leaders in the business community about how OD can help them achieve business results.
  • 22. In 2010 Create Multiple Avenues • Use round table discussions to create intentional connections between members—deepen knowledge & networking • Provide three additional program opportunities for professional development outside the monthly programs Leading Edge Topics • Identify two leading-edge, OD-related topics to incorporate into 2010 programming
  • 23. In 2010 More Robust Website • Create a plan for website development that will include the features most in demand from members, as indicated in 2009 (and future) member survey Increased Awareness with Senior Leaders • Target one event per year to invite and target the interests of a broader audience, including business leaders
  • 24. How Can You Make a Difference? • Stake a claim in the success of Omaha OD Network – We‘re striving to move from less than 10% members actively involved, contributing to the organization beyond monthly meetings, to 20% members actively involved in 2010. • Use your strengths to contribute to our cause: – Program and Professional Development Committees Need People Who: • have ideas or who • ―know people‖ who would be good resources or who • Like to organize or people who • Get smarter or people who • Like to network or people who • Just want to make this a stronger, more vibrant and exciting chapter Contact Nikki Novotney Rieck (303-596-3357) or Pam Nienaber (402-481-5693) -- Program Committee or Todd Conkright (777-3925) for Professional Development – Communications Committee Needs a Few People who are Interested in Working with our Website Strategy and Vendor, Contact Dani Evans (361-7471)
  • 25. "I dwell in possibility." Emily Dickinson (1830-1886) American poet "We do not describe the world we see, we see the world we describe. " by Joseph Jaworksi, Synchronicity the Inner Path of Leadership